Kosmos 1409

Summary

Kosmos 1409 (Russian: Космос 1409 meaning Cosmos 1409) was a Soviet US-K missile early warning satellite which was launched in 1982 as part of the Soviet military's Oko programme.[4] Kosmos 1409 replaced Kosmos 1217 as part of the Oko constellation of satellites and covered the plane 2 - 317° longitude of ascending node.[5]

Kosmos 1409
NamesКосмос 1409
Mission typeEarly warning system
OperatorRussian Strategic Nuclear Forces
COSPAR ID1982-095A Edit this at Wikidata
SATCAT no.13585
Mission duration4 years (achieved) [1]
Spacecraft properties
Spacecraft typeOko No. 6008
BusUS-K
Launch mass2,400 kg (5,300 lb)
Dry mass1,250 kg (2,760 lb)
Dimensions2 m (6 ft 7 in) long and 1.7 m (5 ft 7 in) diameter
Start of mission
Launch date22 September 1982,
06:23:11 UTC[2]
RocketMolniya-M / Blok 2BL
Launch sitePlesetsk, Site 16/2
ContractorTsSKB-Progress
Entered service22 September 1982
End of mission
Deactivated5 January 1987 [1]
Decay date8 June 2009
Orbital parameters
Reference systemGeocentric orbit[3]
RegimeMolniya orbit
Slot2
Perigee altitude613 km (381 mi)
Apogee altitude39,340 km (24,440 mi)
Inclination62.80°
Period709.00 minutes
Instruments
Telescope
Kosmos Series
Kosmos 1410 →
 

MissionEdit

The satellite was designed to identify missile launches using optical telescopes and infrared sensors.[4]

LaunchEdit

Kosmos 1409 was launched from Site 16/2 from Plesetsk Cosmodrome in Soviet Union.[2] A Molniya-M launch vehicle with a Blok 2BL upper stage was used to perform the launch, which took place at 06:23:11 UTC on 22 September 1982.[2] The launch successfully placed the satellite into a Molniya orbit. It subsequently received its Kosmos designation, and the COSPAR International Designator 1982-095A.[6] The United States Space Command assigned it the Satellite Catalog Number 13585.[6]

Atmospheric entryEdit

It reentered the Earth's atmosphere on 8 June 2009.[6]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Podvig, Pavel (6 February 2002). "History and the Current Status of the Russian Early-Warning System" (PDF). Science and Global Security. 10 (1): 21–60. Bibcode:2002S&GS...10...21P. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.692.6127. doi:10.1080/08929880212328. ISSN 0892-9882. S2CID 122901563. Archived from the original (PDF) on 15 March 2012. Retrieved 16 November 2021.
  2. ^ a b c McDowell, Jonathan (21 July 2021). "Launch Log". Jonathan's Space Report. Retrieved 16 November 2021.
  3. ^ "Trajectory: Kosmos 1409 (1982-095A)". NASA. 28 October 2021. Retrieved 16 November 2021.   This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  4. ^ a b "US-K (73D6)". Gunter's Space Page. 11 December 2017. Retrieved 16 November 2021.
  5. ^ "Display: Kosmos 1409 (1982-095A)". NASA. 28 October 2021. Retrieved 16 November 2021.   This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  6. ^ a b c McDowell, Jonathan (21 July 2021). "Satellite Catalog". Jonathan's Space Report. Retrieved 16 November 2021.