Kosmos 149

Summary

Kosmos 149
Mission typeTechnology
OperatorVNIIEM
COSPAR ID1967-024A
SATCAT no.02714
Mission duration17 days
Spacecraft properties
Spacecraft typeDS-MO
ManufacturerYuzhnoye
Launch mass375 kg [1]
Start of mission
Launch date21 March 1967, 10:04:00 GMT
RocketKosmos-2I 63SM
Launch siteKapustin Yar, Site 86/1
ContractorYuzhnoye
End of mission
Decay date7 April 1967
Orbital parameters
Reference systemGeocentric [2]
RegimeLow Earth
Perigee altitude243 km
Apogee altitude285 km
Inclination48.4°
Period89.76 minutes
Epoch21 March 1967
 

Kosmos 149 (Russian: Космос 149 meaning Cosmos 149), also known as DS-MO No.1 was a technology demonstration satellite which was launched by the Soviet Union in 1967 as part of the Dnepropetrovsk Sputnik programme. Its primary mission was to demonstrate orientation control by means of an aerodynamic skirt stabiliser.[3] It also carried an optical research payload for the Soviet Armed Forces and had a mass of 375 kilograms (827 lb).[1]

It was launched aboard a Kosmos-2I 63SM rocket [4] from Site 86/1 at Kapustin Yar. The launch occurred at 10:07 GMT on 21 March 1967.[5]

Kosmos 149 was placed into a low Earth orbit with a perigee of 243 kilometres (151 mi), an apogee of 285 kilometres (177 mi), an inclination of 48.4°, and an orbital period of 89.76 minutes.[2] It decayed from orbit on 7 April 1967.[6] Kosmos 149 was the first of two DS-MO satellites to be launched. It was succeeded by Kosmos 320, which was launched in January 1970.[7]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "Cosmos 149: Display 1967-024A". nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov. NASA. 27 February 2020. Retrieved 13 April 2020. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  2. ^ a b "Cosmos 149: Trajectory 1967-024A". nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov. NASA. 27 February 2020. Retrieved 13 April 2020.
  3. ^ Wade, Mark. "DS-MO". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Archived from the original on 5 January 2009. Retrieved 27 May 2009.
  4. ^ McDowell, Jonathan. "Launch Log". Jonathan's Space Page. Retrieved 27 May 2009.
  5. ^ Wade, Mark. "Kosmos 2". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Archived from the original on 8 July 2012. Retrieved 27 May 2009.
  6. ^ McDowell, Jonathan. "Satellite Catalog". Jonathan's Space Page. Retrieved 27 May 2009.
  7. ^ Wade, Mark. "DS". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Archived from the original on 31 March 2009. Retrieved 27 May 2009.