Kosmos 7

Summary

Kosmos 7
Mission typeOptical imaging reconnaissance
Radiation
Harvard designation1962 Alpha Iota 1
COSPAR ID1962-033A
SATCAT no.00346
Mission duration4 days
Spacecraft properties
Spacecraft typeZenit-2
ManufacturerOKB-1
Launch mass4610 kg [1]
Start of mission
Launch date28 July 1962, 09:18:31 GMT
RocketVostok-2 s/n T15000-07
Launch siteBaikonur, Site 1/5
ContractorOKB-1
End of mission
DisposalRecovered
Landing date1 August 1962
Landing siteSteppe in Kazakhstan
Orbital parameters
Reference systemGeocentric [2]
RegimeLow Earth
Perigee altitude197 km
Apogee altitude356 km
Inclination64.95°
Period90.1 minutes
Epoch28 July 1962
 

Kosmos 7 (Russian: Космос 7 meaning Cosmos 7), also known as Zenit-2 No.4 and occasionally in the West as Sputnik 17 was a Soviet reconnaissance satellite launched in 1962. It was the seventh satellite to be designated under the Kosmos system, and the second successful launch of a Soviet reconnaissance satellite.[3]

Spacecraft

Kosmos 7 was a Zenit-2 satellite, a first generation, low resolution reconnaissance satellite derived from the Vostok spacecraft used for crewed flights.[1] It also marked the first successful launch of a Vostok-2, on the second attempt. It had a mass of 4,610 kilograms (10,160 lb).[1] The first Vostok-2 launch, also carrying a Zenit-2 satellite, suffered an engine failure seconds after launch on 1 June 1962, fell back to earth and exploded within 300 metres (980 ft) of the launch pad.

Kosmos 7 was one of a series of Soviet Earth satellites whose purpose was to study outer space, the upper layers of the atmosphere, and the Earth. Scientific data and measurements were relayed to Earth by multichannel telemetry systems equipped with space-borne memory units.

Mission

Vostok-2, s/n T15000-07, was used to launch Kosmos 7.[4] The launch was conducted from Site 1/5 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, and occurred at 09:18:31 GMT on 28 July 1962.[5] Kosmos 7 was placed into a low Earth orbit with a perigee of 197 kilometres (122 mi), an apogee of 356 kilometres (221 mi), an inclination of 64.95°, and an orbital period of 90.1 minutes.[2] It conducted a four-day mission, before being deorbited and landing by parachute on 1 August 1962, and recovered by the Soviet forces in the steppe in Kazakhstan.[6]

It was the second Zenit-2 to reach orbit, the first being Kosmos 4. The next Zenit-2 launch will be Kosmos 9.[3] In addition to reconnaissance, it was also used for radiation measurements made for safety during the flight of the Vostok 3 and Vostok 4 spacecraft.[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d "Cosmos 7: Display 1962-033A". nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov. NASA. 27 February 2020. Retrieved 23 April 2020. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  2. ^ a b "Cosmos 7: Trajectory 1962-033A". nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov. NASA. 27 February 2020. Retrieved 23 April 2020. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  3. ^ a b Wade, Mark. "Zenit-2". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Archived from the original on 21 April 2012. Retrieved 23 May 2009.
  4. ^ McDowell, Jonathan. "Launch Log". Jonathan's Space Page. Retrieved 23 May 2009.
  5. ^ Wade, Mark. "Soyuz". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Archived from the original on 17 January 2010. Retrieved 23 May 2009.
  6. ^ McDowell, Jonathan. "Satellite Catalog". Jonathan's Space Page. Retrieved 23 May 2009.