Kreider-Reisner Midget

Summary

Midget
Kreider Riesner Midget left side Aero Digest November 1926.jpg
Role Light racing monoplane
National origin United States
Manufacturer Kreider-Reisner Aircraft Company
Designer F.E. Seiler assisted by A.H. Kreider and George Hardman
First flight 1926
Number built 1

The Kreider-Reisner Midget was an American light racing monoplane, the first aircraft designed by the Kreider-Reisner Aircraft Company of Hagerstown, Maryland.[1]

Design and development

The Midget was a low-wing racing monoplane powered by a 29 hp (22 kW) Wright-Morehouse engine which first flew in 1926.[2] Designed by Charles W Meyers and engineered by Frederick E. Seiler, Jr.,[3] it should not be confused with the Meyers Midget a high-wing monoplane built in the Kreider-Reisner factory for Meyers in the same year.[2] The Midget won the Scientific American Trophy at the 1926 Nationals.[2]

Specifications

Data from Aerofiles,[2] Aero Digest November 1926[4]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Length: 15 ft 2 in (4.62 m)
  • Wingspan: 20 ft 0 in (6.10 m)
  • Height: 4 ft 6 in (1.37 m)
  • Wing area: 55.5 sq ft (5.16 m2)
  • Empty weight: 289 lb (131 kg)
  • Gross weight: 490 lb (222 kg) with 170 lb (77 kg) load
  • Powerplant: 1 × Wright-Morehouse WM-80 2-cylinder air-cooled horizontally-opposed piston engine, 29 hp (22 kW) at 2,500 rpm[5]
  • Propellers: 2-bladed fixed-pitch propeller

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 115 mph (185 km/h, 100 kn)
  • Cruise speed: 90 mph (140 km/h, 78 kn)
  • Stall speed: 45 mph (72 km/h, 39 kn)
  • g limits: 9 (ultimate load)
  • Wing loading: 8.33 lb/sq ft (40.7 kg/m2)
  • Power/mass: 0.058 hp/lb (0.095 kW/kg)
  • Fuel consumption: 60 mpg‑US (72 mpg‑imp; 26 km/l) at cruise speed

References

  1. ^ The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft (Part Work 1982-1985). Orbis Publishing. p. 1674.
  2. ^ a b c d "American airplanes: Ka - Ku". www.aerofiles.com. 7 March 2009. Retrieved 19 November 2011.
  3. ^ "Hagerstown Regional Airport" (PDF). Washington County.
  4. ^ "Kreider-Reisner "Midget"". Aero Digest. IX (5): 362. November 1926. Retrieved 22 March 2020.
  5. ^ "Morehouse". www.enginehistory.org. Retrieved 22 March 2020.