LP 816-60

Summary

LP 816-60
Observation data
Epoch J2000      Equinox J2000
Constellation Capricornus
Right ascension 20h 52m 33.01679s[1]
Declination −16° 58′ 29.0249″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 11.458[2]
Characteristics
Spectral type M4[3]
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv)8.5[4] km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: -309.115[5] mas/yr
Dec.: 37.051[5] mas/yr
Parallax (π)177.9312 ± 0.0365[5] mas
Distance18.330 ± 0.004 ly
(5.620 ± 0.001 pc)
Details[6]
Mass0.224±0.022 M
Radius0.266±0.012 R
Surface gravity (log g)4.584[7] cgs
Temperature3030±27[8] K
Metallicity [Fe/H]-0.11±0.07[8] dex
Rotation67.6±0.1 d.[9]
Rotational velocity (v sin i)2.70±0.66[7] km/s
Age2.57+8.15
−1.95
 Gyr
Other designations
HIP 103039[1], LP 816-60, NLTT 50038[10], TYC 6348-400-1[11], 2MASS J20523304-1658289
Database references
SIMBADdata

LP 816-60 is a single[3] red dwarf star of spectral type M4, located in constellation Capricornus at 18.6 light-years from Earth.[1]

History of observations

The discovery name of this star is LP 816-60,[12] which indicates that its discovery was published between 1963 and 1981 in University of Minnesota, Minneapolis.[13]

LP 816-60 is known at least from 1979, when it was included to Luyten's catalogue NLTT.[10]

Physical properties

No massive planets were detected around LP 816-60 as in 2013.[3] The star has a magnetic starspot cycle of 10.6±1.7 years,[9] and weak magnetic fields in chromosphere averaging 4.4 G.[14]

References

  1. ^ a b c d Perryman; et al. (1997). "HIP 103039". The Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogues. Retrieved 2014-11-29.
  2. ^ Koen, C.; Kilkenny, D.; van Wyk, F.; Marang, F. (2010). "UBV(RI)C JHK observations of Hipparcos-selected nearby stars". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 403 (4): 1949–1968. Bibcode:2010MNRAS.403.1949K. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2009.16182.x.
  3. ^ a b c THE TRENDS HIGH-CONTRAST IMAGING SURVEY. IV. THE OCCURRENCE RATE OF GIANT PLANETS AROUND M-DWARFS, 2013, arXiv:1307.5849
  4. ^ The Solar Neighborhood XLIV: RECONS Discoveries within 10 Parsecs, 2018, arXiv:1804.07377
  5. ^ a b Brown, A. G. A.; et al. (Gaia collaboration) (2021). "Gaia Early Data Release 3: Summary of the contents and survey properties". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 649: A1. arXiv:2012.01533. Bibcode:2021A&A...649A...1G. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/202039657. S2CID 227254300. Gaia EDR3 record for this source at VizieR.
  6. ^ HOW TO CONSTRAIN YOUR M DWARF: MEASURING EFFECTIVE TEMPERATURE, BOLOMETRIC LUMINOSITY, MASS, AND RADIUS, 2015, arXiv:1501.01635
  7. ^ a b {{citation|arxiv=1908.04627|year=2019|title=
  8. ^ a b ODUSSEAS: a machine learning tool to derive effective temperature and metallicity for M dwarf stars, 2020, arXiv:2002.09367
  9. ^ a b Magnetic cycles and rotation periods of late-type stars from photometric time series, 2016, arXiv:1607.03049
  10. ^ a b Luyten, Willem Jacob (1979). "NLTT 50038". NLTT Catalogue.
  11. ^ Perryman; et al. (1997). "HIP 103039". The Hipparcos and Tycho Catalogues. Retrieved 2014-11-29.
  12. ^ Kirkpatrick, J. Davy; Gelino, Christopher R.; Cushing, Michael C.; Mace, Gregory N.; Griffith, Roger L.; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Marsh, Kenneth A.; Wright, Edward L.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; McLean, Ian S.; Mainzer, Amy K.; Burgasser, Adam J.; Tinney, Chris G.; Parker, Stephen; Salter, Graeme (2012). "Further Defining Spectral Type "Y" and Exploring the Low-mass End of the Field Brown Dwarf Mass Function". The Astrophysical Journal. 753 (2): 156. arXiv:1205.2122. Bibcode:2012ApJ...753..156K. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/753/2/156. S2CID 119279752.
  13. ^ Dictionary of Nomenclature of Celestial Objects. LP entry. SIMBAD. Centre de Données astronomiques de Strasbourg.
  14. ^ SPIRou Input Catalog: Activity, Rotation and Magnetic Field of Cool Dwarfs, 2017, arXiv:1709.01650