Lincoln City F.C.

Summary

Lincoln City Football Club is a professional association football club based in the city of Lincoln, Lincolnshire, England. The team compete in EFL League One, the third tier of the English football league system. Nicknamed the "Imps" after the legend of the Lincoln Imp, they have played at 10,120-capacity Sincil Bank since their move from John O'Gaunts in 1895. Traditionally they play in red and white striped shirts with black shorts and red and white socks. They hold rivalries with other Lincolnshire clubs, particularly Scunthorpe United and Grimsby Town.

Lincoln City
Lincoln City FC logo.svg
Full nameLincoln City Football Club
Nickname(s)The Imps
Founded1884; 138 years ago (1884)
GroundSincil Bank
Capacity10,780[1]
ChairmanClive Nates[2]
ManagerMark Kennedy
LeagueEFL League One
2021–22EFL League One, 17th of 24
WebsiteClub website
Current season

Founded in 1884, Lincoln won the Midland League in 1889–90, their first full season playing league football. They moved on from the Football Alliance to become founder members of the Football League Second Division in 1892, remaining there until they failed re-election in 1908. They won immediate re-election after winning the next year's Midland League, and would repeat this feat after failing re-election again in 1911 and 1920. Founder members of the Football League Third Division North in 1921, they won promotion as champions in 1931–32, but were relegated two seasons later. Crowned Third Division North champions again in 1947–48, they were relegated the next year, but would remain in the second tier for nine seasons after again winning the Third Division North title in 1951–52. Two successive relegations left them in the Fourth Division by 1962, where they would remain until Graham Taylor's title winning campaign of 1975–76.

Relegated in 1978–79, they secured promotion again two years later but suffered a double relegation to find themselves in the Conference by 1987. Lincoln made an immediate recovery however, regaining their Football League status with the Conference title in 1987–88. They were promoted again in 1997–98, but were relegated the next season. They reached the play-offs in five consecutive seasons, from 2002 to 2007, losing in the final twice (2002–03 and 2004–05) and the semi-finals three times, which is a competition record. However they exited the division at the other end when they were returned to the Conference after relegation at the end of the 2010–11 campaign. A six-season stay in non-league was ended when Cowley brothers Nicky and Danny led the club to the National League title in 2016–17, as well as a run to the quarter-finals of the FA Cup – this made them the first non-league side to reach that stage in 103 years. They won the EFL Trophy in 2018 and the League Two title in 2018–19.

HistoryEdit

 
Chart of table positions of Lincoln City in the Football League

Football in the city of Lincoln had been prominent since the 1860s although not strictly connected to the modern day club. After the disbanding of Lincoln Rovers (formerly Lincoln Recreation) in 1884, Lincoln City FC was formed as an amateur football association, and the first game Lincoln played was an emphatic 9–1 victory over local rivals Sleaford, on 4 October 1884. Originally they played at the John O'Gaunts ground, provided by wealthy local brewer Robert Dawber.

Lincoln turned professional in the 1891–92 season, and soon helped to form what was then the Second Division in 1892–93 season, as an increasing number of clubs wished to join the Football League. Their first game in the Football League was a 4–2 away defeat to Sheffield United on 3 September 1892.[3] Their first home game was also against Sheffield United, this time, however, Lincoln won 1–0. Due to Dawber's death in 1895, Lincoln moved from the John O'Gaunts Ground to Sincil Bank.

 
Lincoln fans do a card display before a match against Swindon

They failed re-election to the Football League in 1908. They won immediate re-election after winning the next year's Midland League, and would repeat this feat after failing re-election again in 1911 and 1920. Founder members of the Football League Third Division North in 1921, they won promotion as champions in 1931–32, but were relegated two seasons later. Crowned Third Division North champions again in 1947–48, they were relegated the next year, but would remain in the second tier for nine seasons after again winning the Third Division North title in 1951–52. Two successive relegations left them in the Fourth Division by 1962, where they would remain until Graham Taylor's title winning campaign of 1975–76. The next would oscillate between the Third and Fourth division for the next 10 years, missing out on promotion to the Second Division in 1982 and 1983.

Lincoln were relegated to the Fourth Division at the end of the 1985–86 season, and the year after that they became the first team to suffer automatic relegation from the Football League. They regained their Football League place automatically via promotion as champions of the Conference at the first attempt. In the 1997–98 season, Lincoln were promoted from the Third Division (previously the Fourth Division), but were immediately relegated back on the next season. On 3 May 2002 Lincoln entered into administration.[4] Lincoln City were relegated again from League Two (previously the Third Division) on the last day of the end of the 2010–11 season. In the 2016–17 season of the National League (English football) (previously the Conference), Lincoln City under Danny Cowley were promoted as champions back to the Football League.

In the 2016–17 FA Cup, Lincoln beat Championship side Ipswich Town, in a replay, after progressing past Guiseley, Altrincham and Oldham Athletic, before defeating Championship leaders Brighton and Hove Albion at Sincil Bank to make the fifth round of the FA cup for the first time since the end of the Victorian era. On 18 February, Lincoln went on to beat top flight side Burnley 1–0 to historically go through to the FA Cup quarter final, the first time a non-league club had progressed to the last eight since 1914.[5][6] In the quarter finals, they were defeated 5–0 at Arsenal.[7]

In the 2017–18 season, on 6 February 2018, Lincoln beat Chelsea U21s in the semi-final of the 2017–18 EFL Trophy, taking them to Wembley Stadium for the first time in the 134 years of the club. They went on to win the final against Shrewsbury Town on 8 April 2018. The winning goal was scored by Elliot Whitehouse in the 16th minute and was the only goal of the match.[8] On 12 May Lincoln drew 0–0 with Exeter City F.C in the first leg of the League Two Playoff.[9] In the second leg, on 17 May, Lincoln lost 3–1.[10]

In the 2018–19 season, on 5 April 2019, Lincoln announced that Nettleham Ladies FC would be rebranded as Lincoln City Women from 1 June.[11] Lincoln won League Two, on 22 April 2019, after a 0–0 draw against Tranmere Rovers, having been top of the table since 25 August 2018.[12] Promotion from League Two represented Lincoln's first season in the EFL League One since the 1998-99 campaign.

Lincoln began their first season in the third tier in over twenty years with relative success, victorious in their first three games against Accrington Stanley, Rotherham and Southend.[13][14][15] On 9 September 2019 the team's then manager, Danny Cowley, announced his departure to join Championship side Huddersfield Town, having guided Lincoln to two promotions in his previous three seasons alongside brother and assistant manager Nicky.[16]

On 20 September 2019, Lincoln appointed Michael Appleton as their first team coach.[17] At the time of EFL games being suspended on 13 March 2020, Lincoln were in 15th position in the league table. When the season was curtailed on 9 June 2020, Lincoln finished in 16th place on a points per game basis with 42 points from 35 games.

The 2020-2021 season started brightly for Lincoln, and were in 1st place in early January 2021. However a Covid outbreak in the squad and several injuries saw form fall away. Lincoln finished the season in 5th place, qualifying for the playoffs. Lincoln faced Sunderland across the two legs of the semi finals, the first being at the LNER stadium which saw home fans attend a match for the first time since March 2020, around 3,145 fans were in attendance. Lincoln won the first leg, 2-0 withe goals from Tom Hopper and on loan Brennan Johnson. The second leg saw Sunderland score twice to cancel out Lincolns lead from the first leg. Tom Hopper scored in the 56th minute to restore Lincolns lead on aggregate 3-2, with that being the final scoreline. On 30 May 2021, Lincoln faced Blackpool in the play off final at Wembley. Just their second appearance Wembley, following the 2018 Checkatrade Final win over Shrewsbury. Lincoln got off to the best possible start, going 1-0 up after just 50 seconds after Blackpool player Turton turned in a Brennan Johnson cross. Two goals either side of half time from Blackpools Kenny Dougall ensured Lincoln missed out on promotion to the Championship.

StadiumEdit

 
The Lincolnshire Echo Stand at Lincoln's Ground, Sincil Bank

The club have played at Sincil Bank since 1895. Previously, Lincoln City had played at the nearby John O'Gaunts ground since the club's 1884 inception. Sincil Bank has an overall capacity of 10,120[18] and is colloquially known to fans as "The Bank". It is overlooked by Lincoln Cathedral.[19] Former Lincoln City chairman John Reames re-purchased the ground from the local council in 2000 at a cost of £175,000. The club had sold it in 1982 for £225,000 to fend off the threat of eviction, arranging a 125-year lease.

Sincil Bank hosted England's 2–0 win over Scotland in the Victory Shield on 28 November 2008.[20] Martin Peters paraded the FIFA World Cup Trophy at the ground in March 2010 as part of its global tour.[21] FA WSL club Lincoln Ladies played home games at Sincil Bank in their 2011 season.[22] The Ladies' club had previously hosted Arsenal Ladies there in an FA Women's Cup semi-final in March 2008.[23]

RivalsEdit

 
The Lincolnshire derby, between Lincoln City and local rivals Boston United, being played at Sincil Bank

Lincoln City is one of three professional football clubs in Lincolnshire. Lincoln City's main rivals are Grimsby Town and Scunthorpe United, which at various points fans have considered one bigger than the other. Other prominent Lincolnshire rivals of the past include Gainsborough Trinity and Boston United, however meetings are nowadays limited between the clubs.

Nottinghamshire clubs Mansfield Town and Notts County are also considered rivals, and Peterborough United, Hull City and York City are clubs that have had some sort of rivalry with The Imps in the past. Lincoln United, the other football club based in Lincoln, are further down the footballing pyramid and are not a considered rival.

Badge and coloursEdit

BadgeEdit

Lincoln City currently sport a "traditional" Lincoln Imp badge, synonymous with the success of the 70s and 80s. The badge was returned in 2014, with general manager John Vickers billing it the start of a "new era".[24] Between the two spells the club used two badges, the first of which being the city's heraldic shield with the letters "L.C.F.C" inscribed onto it. This badge was used until 2001, when the club used a similar design; however, it featured a yellow imp in the centre, with the nickname of "The Imps" written across.

ColoursEdit

Traditionally, the colours and design of the Lincoln City strip are a red and white striped shirt along with black shorts and red socks. This varied in the late 1960s and early 70s, the club opted to field a predominantly red strip with white shorts, and also in the 2000–01 season when the shirt was quartered red and white with white shorts. Currently, the home kit is largely red with white pinstriping down the length of the shirt, as well as black and white accents around the collar and cuff of the shirt. The shorts of the kit are also largely black, sporting red accents, and the socks red with black and white accents. Their away kit has never retained any single pattern or design, and areas varied vastly throughout the seasons, but is currently black across the shirt, shorts and socks with red accents on the edges of each piece. In recent years, the club have also released a third kit. Currently, the kit is green in colour, with a chevron pattern across it. This kit features white accents on the shirt, and white shorts with green accents.

Kit suppliers and shirt sponsorsEdit

The following tables detail the kit suppliers and sponsors of Lincoln City by year:[25]

Kit suppliers
Period Supplier
1973–1978 Umbro
1978–1983 Adidas
1983–1985 Lowfields
1985–1987 Osca
1987–1990 Spall
1990–1994 Matchwinner
1994–1997 Admiral
1997–1999 Super League
1999–2001 AVEC
2001–2004 Imps Sport
2004–2006 Lincoln City Collection
2006–2007 Uhlsport
2007–2011 Umbro
2011–2015 Nike
2015–present Errea
Front of shirt sponsors
Period Sponsor
1982 J. Arthur Bowers
1983–1989 F&T Tyres
1989–1990 Wheel Horse
1990–1991 Pickford
1991–1992 Findalls
1992–1998 Lincolnshire Echo
1998–2003 Alstom
2003–2004 Siemens
2004–2006 The Community Solutions Group
2006–2010 Starglaze
2010–2011 GoCar
2011–2013 TSM
2013–2018 Bishop Grosseteste University
2018–2019 NSUK Asbestos Surveys
2019–2020 SRP Hire
2020–2021 Peregrine Holdings
2021–2022 Virgin Wines (Home 1/5)
Light Source (Home 2/5)
Buildbase (Home 3/5)
University of Lincoln (Home 4/5)
Branston Ltd (Home 5/5)
SRP Hire (Away)
2022–present Branston

Current squadEdit

First teamEdit

As of 15 August 2022 [26]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
1 GK   ENG Carl Rushworth (on loan from Brighton & Hove Albion)
2 DF   WAL Regan Poole
4 DF   NED Lewis Montsma
5 DF   ENG Adam Jackson
6 MF   ENG Max Sanders
7 FW   ENG Charles Vernam
8 MF   ENG Tashan Oakley-Boothe (on loan from Stoke City)
9 FW   ENG Tom Hopper (captain)
10 MF   ENG Teddy Bishop
11 FW   IRL Anthony Scully
14 FW   JAM Jordan Garrick (on loan from Swansea City)
15 DF   IRL Paudie O'Connor
16 DF   WAL Joe Walsh
17 DF   SCO Jamie Robson
No. Pos. Nation Player
18 FW   SCO Ben House
19 MF   IRL Danny Mandroiu
20 DF   ENG Jay Benn
21 MF   DEN Lasse Sørensen
22 DF   ENG TJ Eyoma
24 DF   IRL Sean Roughan
28 FW   SCO Chris Maguire
29 GK   ENG Jordan Wright
34 FW   ENG Freddie Draper
35 MF   IRL Billy Brooks
37 MF   IRL Oisin Gallagher
38 DF   ENG Elicha Ahui
46 FW   ENG Charley Kendall

Out on loanEdit

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
23 FW   ENG Hakeeb Adelakun (on loan to Gillingham)
31 GK   SCO Sam Long (on loan to Boston United)
32 FW   ENG Jovon Makama (on loan to Brackley Town)
No. Pos. Nation Player
33 DF   ENG Hayden Cann (on loan to Gainsborough Trinity)
36 MF   ENG Morgan Worsfold-Gregg (on loan to Rushden & Diamonds)

Under 18s squadEdit

As of 2 September 2021[27]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
41 GK   ENG Sam Green
DF   ENG Osei Boffah
DF   ENG Nathan Kabeya
DF   ENG Darryl Powell
DF   ENG Josh Simpson
MF   ENG Mehki Angol
No. Pos. Nation Player
MF   ENG Harry Dale
MF   ENG Ethan Hilton
MF   ENG Theo Mussell
MF   ENG Kyrell Wheatley
FW   ENG Tayo Alexander-Tucker
FW   ENG Julian Donnery

Club managementEdit

Board membersEdit

Role Name
Chairman Clive Nates
Vice Chairman Jay Wright
Director Roger Bates
Director (RICT) Rob Bradley
Director Sunil Hindocha
Director Herman Kok
Director Greg Levine
Director David Lowes
Director/Sportvest Partner Sean Melnick
Chief Executive Officer Liam Scully
Director - Gold Trust Members Amanda-Jane Slater
Director Stephen Tointon
Director Chris Travers
Strategic Advisor Landon Donovan

Backroom staffEdit

Role Nat. Name
Head coach   Mark Kennedy
Assistant head coach   Mike Garrity
Professional development phase lead   Tom Shaw
Goalkeeper coach   Scott Fry
Head of Performance   Ross Burbeary
Head of Performance & Recruitment Analysis   Joe Hutchinson
Lead Sports Scientist   Luke Jelly
Physio   Kieran Walker
Assistant Sports Scientist   Harry Rossington
Performance Analyst   Jake Dayus
Kit Manager   Terry Bourne
Chief Scout   Marc Tracy
Performance coach   Mark Pease
Therapist   Tom Hallas
Director of Football   Jez George

Managerial historyEdit

Name Nat. From To Record
P W D L Win %
John Strawson   September 1892 February 1896 97 31 11 55 31.96%
Alf Martin   1896 March 1897 35 9 11 24 25.71%
James West   1897 1900 106 34 22 50 32.08%
David Calderhead   1 August 1900 1 August 1907 256 89 53 114 34.77%
John Henry Strawson   1 August 1907 31 May 1914 195 52 40 103 26.67%
George Fraser   1 August 1919 31 May 1921 46 10 10 26 21.74%
David Calderhead Jr.   1 April 1921 31 May 1924 118 37 28 53 31.36%
Horace Henshall   1 August 1924 1 May 1927 132 51 28 53 38.64%
Harry Parkes   1 May 1927 1 May 1936 395 187 78 130 47.34%
Joe McClelland   1 May 1936 1 January 1946 140 61 27 52 43.57%
Bill Anderson   1 January 1946 1 January 1965 855 307 189 359 35.91%
Con Moulson   1 January 1965 1 March 1965 8 0 0 8 00.00%
Roy Chapman   1 March 1965 31 May 1966 65 15 13 37 23.08%
Ron Gray   1 August 1966 1 July 1970 184 60 55 69 32.61%
Bert Loxley   1 July 1970 1 March 1971 32 12 4 16 37.50%
David Herd   1 March 1971 6 December 1972 82 30 30 22 36.59%
Graham Taylor   6 December 1972 20 June 1977 211 97 61 53 45.97%
George Kerr   20 June 1977 1 December 1977 18 5 4 9 27.78%
Willie Bell   21 December 1977 23 October 1978 40 11 13 16 27.50%
Colin Murphy   6 November 1978 1 May 1985 309 121 88 100 39.16%
John Pickering   1 July 1985 20 December 1985 24 4 6 14 16.67%
George Kerr   20 December 1985 7 March 1987 61 17 17 27 27.87%
Peter Daniel   7 March 1987 1 May 1987 12 2 5 5 16.67%
Colin Murphy   26 May 1987 20 May 1990 103 39 26 38 37.86%
Allan Clarke   3 June 1990 30 November 1990 18 3 6 9 16.67%
Steve Thompson   1 November 1990 31 May 1993 128 48 36 44 37.50%
Keith Alexander   1 August 1993 16 May 1994 48 13 13 22 27.08%
Sam Ellis   1 August 1994 4 September 1995 56 21 12 23 37.50%
Steve Wicks   4 September 1995 16 October 1995 7 0 2 5 00.00%
John Beck   16 October 1995 6 March 1998 130 48 42 40 36.92%
Shane Westley   7 March 1998 11 November 1998 30 9 5 16 30.00%
John Reames   11 November 1998 1 June 2000 87 30 21 36 34.48%
Phil Stant   1 June 2000 27 February 2001 38 12 10 16 31.58%
Alan Buckley   28 February 2001 25 April 2002 69 16 24 29 23.19%
Keith Alexander   5 May 2002 24 May 2006 213 81 69 63 38.03%
John Schofield   15 June 2006 15 October 2007 51 21 12 18 41.18%
Peter Jackson   30 October 2007 2 September 2009 92 32 21 39 34.78%
Chris Sutton   28 September 2009 28 September 2010 51 14 14 23 28.00%
Steve Tilson   15 October 2010 10 October 2011 37 11 7 19 29.73%
David Holdsworth   31 October 2011 17 February 2013 71 21 19 31 29.57%
Gary Simpson   27 February 2013 3 November 2014 58 23 15 20 39.65%
Chris Moyses   3 November 2014 12 May 2016 64 22 15 27 34.38%
Danny Cowley   12 May 2016 9 September 2019 176 95 42 39 53.98%
Michael Appleton   23 September 2019 30 April 2022 143 55 33 55 38.5%
Mark Kennedy   12 May 2022 current 0 0 0 0 0%

HonoursEdit

LeagueEdit

Football League Third Division North / League One (3rd tier)

Football League Fourth Division / League Two (4th tier)

Conference / National League (5th tier)

CupEdit

Football League Trophy

Football League Group Trophy

Conference Championship Shield

  • Winners: 1988

Other/Youth and ReserveEdit

Lincolnshire Senior Cup

  • Winners (38): 1886–87, 1890–91, 1891–92, 1893–94, 1907–08, 1909–10, 1911–12, 1913–14, 1914–15, 1919–20, 1921–22, 1923–24, 1925–26, 1926–27, 1930–31, 1931–32, 1933–34, 1934–35, 1945–46, 1947–48, 1948–49, 1950–51, 1955–566, 1961–62, 1963–646, 1965–666, 1966–67, 1968–69, 1969–70, 1974–75, 1980–81, 1981–82, 1984–85, 1990–91, 1997–98, 2004–05, 2006–07, 2009–10, 2013–14,
  • Runners-up (32): 1892–93, 1894–95, 1896–97, 1900–01, 1902–03, 1903–04, 1908–09, 1912–13, 1920–21, 1922–23, 1925–26, 1927–28, 1928–29, 1929–30, 1932–33, 1935–36, 1936–37, 1937–38, 1946–47, 1949–50, 1951–52, 1954–55, 1958–59, 1959–60, 1976–77, 1978–79, 1985–86, 2007–08, 2009–10, 2010–11, 2011–12, 2014–15

Pontin's Reserve League Cup

  • Winners: 2006–07

Fred Green Memorial Trophy3

  • Winners: 2006–07

John Reames Memorial Trophy

  • Winners: 2013–14

Midland League / Central League

  • Winners: 1889–90, 1908–09, 1911–125, 1920–21
  • Runners-up: 1932–33
  • Third-place: 1928–29

Highest finishesEdit

Highest league finish

FA Cup

EFL Cup

FA Trophy

Club recordsEdit

Source[29]

NotesEdit

  1. ^ "Imps confirm LNER Stadium capacity for 2022/23 season". Lincoln City FC. Retrieved 8 June 2022.
  2. ^ "Lincoln City appoint new chairman". BBC Sport. Retrieved 6 June 2018.
  3. ^ Steve Pearce (1997). "Shoot, The ultimate stats and facts guide to English League Football, p.130". Boxtree.
  4. ^ "City go into administration". Official Website. Lincoln City FC. 3 May 2002. Archived from the original on 7 March 2012. Retrieved 4 March 2010.
  5. ^ "Burnley 0-1 Lincoln City". BBC Sport. 18 February 2017.
  6. ^ "Lincoln City topple Burnley as Sean Raggett seals historic FA Cup shock". Guardian. 18 January 2017. Retrieved 21 February 2017.
  7. ^ "Arsenal 5-0 Lincoln City". BBC Sport. 11 March 2017.
  8. ^ "Lincoln City lift Checkatrade Trophy after narrow win over Shrewsbury". Guardian. 8 April 2018. Retrieved 12 April 2018.
  9. ^ "Lincoln City 0-0 Exeter City". BBC Sport. 12 May 2018.
  10. ^ "Exeter City 3-1 Lincoln City (Agg 3-1)". BBC Sport. 17 May 2018.
  11. ^ "Lincoln City Welcome Women's Football Team". www.redimps.co.uk. Retrieved 24 April 2019.
  12. ^ "Lincoln City 0-0 Tranmere Rovers". BBC Sport. 22 April 2019.
  13. ^ "Lincoln City 2-0 Accrington Stanley". BBC Sport. 3 August 2019.
  14. ^ "Rotherham United 0-2 Lincoln City". BBC Sport. 10 August 2019.
  15. ^ "Lincoln City 4-0 Southend United". BBC Sport. 17 August 2019.
  16. ^ https://www.bbc.co.uk/sport/football/49634696M[dead link]
  17. ^ "Appleton appointed Lincoln manager". BBC Sport.
  18. ^ "10 Things You Never Knew About The Imps". Wrexham Football Club. 22 January 2016. Archived from the original on 15 March 2010. Retrieved 5 May 2017.
  19. ^ David Conn (30 November 2009). "Lincoln look to supporters for survival". The Independent. Archived from the original on 14 June 2022. Retrieved 30 November 2009.
  20. ^ "Lions win Victory Shield". The Football Association. 28 November 2008. Archived from the original on 16 July 2011. Retrieved 19 July 2010.
  21. ^ "Football World Cup trophy to be shown at Lincoln City". BBC. 28 February 2010. Retrieved 19 July 2010.
  22. ^ Tony Leighton (30 November 2009). "OOH Lincoln declare intention to join women's Super League in 2011". The Guardian. Retrieved 19 July 2010.
  23. ^ "Lincoln City Ladies v Arsenal Ladies". BBC Lincolnshire. Retrieved 9 March 2010.
  24. ^ "Lincoln City marks anniversary with red Imp return". BBC News. 2 April 2014. Retrieved 4 March 2016.
  25. ^ "Lincoln City - Historical Football Kits". Historical Football Kits. 2 September 2021. Retrieved 21 October 2021.
  26. ^ "First Team". Lincoln City F.C. Archived from the original on 15 September 2019. Retrieved 31 August 2019.
  27. ^ "Lincoln City Under 18's". Retrieved 2 September 2021.
  28. ^ "Lincoln City sign Akinde from Barnet". BBC Sport. Retrieved 18 September 2020.
  29. ^ The Lincoln City FC Archive Archived 8 October 2007 at the Wayback Machine Lincooln City FC, 26 March 2009

External linksEdit

  • Official Lincoln City website