List of Artemis missions

Summary

Emblem of the Artemis program

The Artemis program is a human spaceflight program by the United States. Missions in the program are aimed at exploration of the Moon, including crewed and robotic exploration of the lunar surface. Three flights of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle are currently planned for launch in the Artemis program in the early 2020s, beginning with Artemis 1. Before Artemis was named, the flights were referred to as "Orion missions". Numerous supporting scientific and technology demonstration missions are planned for launch under the program's Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS), in addition to planned and proposed uncrewed logistical missions to construct and resupply the Gateway and its expendable and reusable lunar landers in lunar orbit.

Main missions

Mission Launch date Crew Launch vehicle[a] Launch pad Duration[b]
Artemis I
Artemis 1 insignia
January 2022[1] N/A SLS Block 1 Crew Kennedy Space Center, LC-39B ~25d
Maiden flight of the SLS, carrying an uncrewed Orion capsule and twelve CubeSats selected through several programs.[2][3][4][5] The payloads will be sent on a trans-lunar injection trajectory.[6][7]
Artemis II September 2023[8] TBA SLS Block 1 Crew Kennedy Space Center, LC-39B ~10d
First crewed flight, carrying four crew members along with numerous CubeSats to be selected through the CubeSat Launch Initiative.[9][10]
Artemis III September 2024[11] TBA SLS Block 1 Crew[12] Kennedy Space Center, LC-39B ~30d
Carrying the Artemis III mission hardware, expected to be the first lunar landing of the Artemis program.[13][12]
Artemis IV March 2026[14] TBA SLS Block 1B Crew Kennedy Space Center, LC-39B ~30d
Debut of the SLS Block 1B and the Exploration Upper Stage, comanifested delivery of Gateway i-HAB module.[15][16]
Artemis V (Proposed) 2026[citation needed] TBA SLS Block 1B Crew Kennedy Space Center, LC-39B ~30d
Artemis VI (Proposed) 2027[citation needed] TBA SLS Block 1B Crew Kennedy Space Center, LC-39B ~30d
Artemis VII (Proposed) 2028[citation needed] N/A SLS Block 1B Cargo Kennedy Space Center, LC-39B >60d
Artemis VIII (Proposed) 2028[citation needed] TBA SLS Block 1B Crew Kennedy Space Center, LC-39B ~30d
Artemis IX (Proposed) 2029[11] TBA SLS Block 1B Crew Kennedy Space Center, LC-39B ~30d
Artemis X (Proposed) 2030 TBA SLS Block 1B Crew Kennedy Space Center, LC-39B <180d

Support missions

Surface missions

Peregrine (left) and Nova-C (right) will be the first two robotic landers to directly support the Artemis program

The Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS) program will support the Artemis program by landing several small payloads focused on scouting for lunar resources, in situ resource utilization (ISRU) experiments and lunar science, in preparation for an extended human presence on the lunar surface.[17][18][19]

List of CLPS missions
Mission Launch date Operator Lander Rover Launch pad Launch vehicle[a] Duration[b] References
Peregrine Mission One Early 2022[20][21] Astrobotic Peregrine Iris Cape Canaveral, SLC-41 Vulcan Centaur [22][23][24][25]
IM-1 Q1 2022 Intuitive Machines Nova-C Kennedy Space Center, LC-39A Falcon 9 [26][27]
PRIME-1 December 2022 Intuitive Machines Nova-C TBA Falcon 9 [28][29]
Blue Ghost Mid 2023 Firefly Aerospace Blue Ghost TBA Falcon 9 ≈2 weeks [30][31][32][33]
Griffin Mission One November 2023 Astrobotic Griffin VIPER Kennedy Space Center, LC-39A Falcon Heavy ≈100 Earth days [34][35][36][37]
MM1 (Masten Mission One) November 2023 Masten Space Systems XL-1 MoonRanger TBA Falcon 9 [21][38]
TBA December 2023 TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA ≈9-10 Earth days [39]
TBA May 2024 TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA ≈9-10 Earth days [39]
TBA H1 2025 TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA ≈9-10 Earth days [40]
TBA Q4 2025 – Q1 2026 TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA ≈9-10 Earth days [40]

Logistics missions

Artist's impression of the Power and Propulsion Element, the first module of the Lunar Gateway, in lunar orbit. It will generate 50 kW (67 hp) of solar electric power for its ion thrusters, life support, and other systems.

Uncrewed missions to assemble and resupply the Gateway will be executed as part of the Artemis program.[41][needs update]

List of Gateway logistics missions
Launch date Payload
November 2024[42][43] Power and Propulsion Element (PPE)
Habitation and Logistics Outpost (HALO)
2024 Expendable lander ascent module[44] for Artemis III
2024 Expendable lander descent module[44]
2024 Expendable lander transfer module[44]
Proposed missions[citation needed]
2025 Expendable lander descent module for Artemis IV
2025 Reusable lander ascent module
2025 Reusable lander transfer module
2026 Expendable lander descent module for Artemis V
2026 Refuel for ascent module
2026 Refuel for transfer module
2027 Expendable lander descent module for Artemis VI
2027 Refuel for ascent module
2027 Refuel for transfer module
2028 Refuel for ascent module for Artemis VII
2028 First refuel for transfer module
2028 Second refuel for transfer module
2028 Reusable descent module

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b Serial number displayed in parentheses.
  2. ^ a b Time displayed in days, hours, minutes, and seconds.

References

  1. ^ Sloss, Philip (29 September 2021). "EGS, Jacobs completing first round of Artemis 1 pre-launch integrated tests prior to Orion stacking". NASASpaceFlight. Retrieved 29 September 2021.
  2. ^ Foust, Jeff (26 August 2021). "SLS cubesats arrive for Artemis 1 launch". SpaceNews. Retrieved 27 August 2021.
  3. ^ Hambleton, Kathryn; Newton, Kim; Ridinger, Shannon (2 February 2016). "NASA Space Launch System's First Flight to Send Small Sci-Tech Satellites into Space". NASA. Retrieved 3 February 2016. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  4. ^ Foust, Jeff (21 May 2019). "In 2020, NASA Will Send Living Things to Deep Space for First Time Since Apollo". Space.com. Archived from the original on 6 August 2019. Retrieved 6 August 2019.
  5. ^ Northon, Karen (9 June 2017). "Three DIY CubeSats Score Rides on Exploration Mission-1". NASA. Archived from the original on 6 August 2019. Retrieved 6 August 2019. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  6. ^ Crane, Aimee (11 June 2019). "Artemis 1 Flight Control Team Simulates Mission Scenarios". NASA. Archived from the original on 6 August 2019. Retrieved 6 August 2019. ...after the Space Launch System performs the Trans-Lunar Injection burn that sends the spacecraft out of Earth orbit and toward the Moon. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  7. ^ Clark, Stephen (22 July 2019). "First moon-bound Orion crew capsule declared complete, major tests remain". Spaceflight Now. Archived from the original on 6 August 2019. Retrieved 6 August 2019. The Artemis 1 mission profile. Credit: NASA [...] The Artemis 1 mission will send the Orion spacecraft into a distant retrograde lunar orbit and back...
  8. ^ Sloss, Philip (31 May 2021). "NASA evaluating schedule, launch date forecasts for Artemis 2". NASASpaceFlight.com. Retrieved 1 June 2021.
  9. ^ Hill, Denise (6 August 2019). "NASA's CubeSat Launch Initiative Opens Call for Payloads on Artemis 2 Mission". NASA. Archived from the original on 6 August 2019. Retrieved 6 August 2019. NASA is seeking proposals from U.S. small satellite developers to fly their CubeSat missions as secondary payloads aboard the SLS on the Artemis 2 mission under the agency's CubeSat Launch Initiative (CSLI) Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  10. ^ Klotz, Irene (5 August 2019). "NASA Scouting Cubesats For Artemis-2 Mission". Aviation Week & Space Technology. Archived from the original on 6 August 2019. Retrieved 6 August 2019. NASA on August 5 released a solicitation for cubesats to ride along with the first crewed flight of the Space Launch System rocket and Orion capsule, with the caveat that selected projects fill strategic knowledge gaps for future lunar and Mars exploration
  11. ^ a b "NASA's Management of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle Program" (PDF). Office of Inspector General (United States) (OIG). NASA. 16 July 2020. p. 7. Retrieved 20 July 2020. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  12. ^ a b Boeing Space (31 July 2019). "Farther and faster: The next stage of America's Moon rocket is taking shape to dramatically reduce travel time in space and carry more on a single flight. The Boeing-built @NASA_SLS Exploration Upper Stage will fly on Artemis-3.pic.twitter.com/pNye8izfiE". Twitter. Retrieved 31 July 2019.
  13. ^ Grush, Loren (22 May 2018). "The first three missions of NASA's next big rocket will have to settle for a less-powerful ride". The Verge. Archived from the original on 6 August 2019. Retrieved 6 August 2019. But now NASA is going to fly all three missions — EM-1, EM-2, and Europa Clipper — on Block 1 [...] According to the memo, NASA will aim to have the second platform ready for a Block 1B launch in the beginning of 2024
  14. ^ "NASA's Management of the Gateway Program for Artemis Missions" (PDF). Office of Inspector General (United States). NASA. 10 November 2020. p. 3. Retrieved 4 January 2021. Artemis IV is scheduled to launch in March 2026 (as of August 2020). Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  15. ^ Loff, Sarah (15 October 2019). "NASA Commits to Future Artemis Missions With More SLS Rocket Stages". NASA. Retrieved 16 October 2019. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  16. ^ "FY 2022 Budget Estimates – Gateway – Program Projects – International Habitat (I-Hab)" (PDF). NASA. 6 May 2021. p. 97 (DEXP-67). Retrieved 27 August 2021. Delivery of I-Hab to the Gateway will be via the SLS Block 1B launch vehicle with Orion providing orbital insertion and docking. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  17. ^ NASA taps 3 companies for commercial moon missions William Harwood CBS News 31 May 2019
  18. ^ NASA awards contracts to three companies to land payloads on the moon Jeff Foust SpaceNews 31 May 2019
  19. ^ "NASA Expands Plans for Moon Exploration: More Missions, More Science". NASA. Retrieved 4 June 2018. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  20. ^ Berger, Eric (25 June 2021). "Rocket Report: China to copy SpaceX's Super Heavy? Vulcan slips to 2022". Ars Technica. Retrieved 30 June 2021.
  21. ^ a b Foust, Jeff (23 June 2021). "Masten delays first lunar lander mission". SpaceNews. Retrieved 24 June 2021.
  22. ^ Potter, Sean (31 May 2019). "NASA Selects First Commercial Moon Landing Services for Artemis". NASA. Retrieved 3 June 2019. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  23. ^ Berger, Eric (31 May 2019). "NASA picks three companies to attempt Moon landings in 2020 and 2021". Ars Technica. Retrieved 3 June 2019.
  24. ^ "Astrobotic Selects United Launch Alliance Vulcan Centaur Rocket to Launch its First Mission to the Moon" (Press release). United Launch Alliance. 19 August 2019. Retrieved 20 August 2019.
  25. ^ Herridge, Linda (22 June 2020). "Former Intern Uses NASA Knowledge to Lead Robotic Moon Rover". NASA. Retrieved 29 September 2020. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  26. ^ "Intuitive Machines-1 Orbital Debris Assessment Report (ODAR) Revision 1.1" (PDF). Intuitive Machines. Federal Communications Commission (FCC). 22 April 2021. Retrieved 24 April 2021. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  27. ^ Kanayama, Lee (13 April 2020). "NOVA-C selects landing site, Masten gains CLPS contracts". NASASpaceFlight.com. Retrieved 3 May 2020.
  28. ^ Brown, Katherine (16 October 2020). "NASA Selects Intuitive Machines to Land Water-Measuring Payload on the Moon". NASA. Retrieved 15 November 2020. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  29. ^ "Intuitive Machines picks SpaceX for second moon mission". Houston Chronicle. 13 January 2021. Retrieved 13 January 2021.
  30. ^ "NASA Selects Firefly Aerospace for Artemis Commercial Moon Delivery in 2023" (Press release). NASA. 4 February 2021. Retrieved 4 February 2021. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  31. ^ Foust, Jeff (4 February 2021). "Firefly wins NASA CLPS lunar lander contract". SpaceNews. Retrieved 5 February 2021.
  32. ^ "Lunar Lander". Firefly Aerospace. 1 February 2021. Retrieved 4 February 2021.
  33. ^ "Firefly Aerospace Awards Contract to SpaceX to Launch Blue Ghost Mission to Moon in 2023". Business Wire. 20 May 2021. Retrieved 24 May 2021.
  34. ^ "NASA Selects Astrobotic to Fly Water-Hunting Rover to the Moon". NASA. 11 June 2020. Retrieved 24 June 2020. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  35. ^ Loff, Sarah (25 October 2019). "New VIPER Lunar Rover to Map Water Ice on the Moon". NASA. Retrieved 20 July 2020. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  36. ^ Foust, Jeff (13 April 2021). "Astrobotic selects Falcon Heavy to launch NASA's VIPER lunar rover". SpaceNews. Retrieved 14 April 2021.
  37. ^ "Astrobotic Selects SpaceX Falcon Heavy Rocket for Griffin-VIPER Moon Mission". Astrobotic. 13 April 2021. Retrieved 14 April 2021.
  38. ^ Boyle, Alan (8 April 2020). "NASA picks Masten Space Systems to deliver science to the moon's south pole". GeekWire. Retrieved 20 July 2020.
  39. ^ a b "Amendment 68: New Opportunity in ROSES: E.11 Payloads and Research Investigations on the Surface of the Moon (PRISM)" (PDF). NASA. 5 November 2020. Retrieved 9 September 2021. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  40. ^ a b "Amendment 34: Payloads and Research Investigations on the Surface of the Moon (PRISM) final text and due dates" (PDF). NASA. 2 September 2021. Retrieved 9 September 2021. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  41. ^ Foust 2019, "After Artemis 3, NASA would launch four additional crewed missions to the lunar surface between 2025 and 2028. Meanwhile, the agency would work to expand the Gateway by launching additional components and crew vehicles and laying the foundation for an eventual Moon base". harvnb error: multiple targets (2×): CITEREFFoust2019 (help)
  42. ^ "NASA, Northrop Grumman Finalize Moon Outpost Living Quarters Contract" (Press release). NASA. 9 July 2021. Retrieved 9 July 2021. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  43. ^ "NASA Awards Contract to Launch Initial Elements for Lunar Outpost" (Press release). NASA. 9 February 2021. Retrieved 9 February 2021. Public Domain This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  44. ^ a b c Gateway Update. NASA Advisory Council. Human Exploration and Operations Committee. Jason Crusan. 7 December 2018.

External links

  • Artemis program at NASA