List of Artemis missions

Summary

Emblem of the Artemis program

The Artemis program is a human spaceflight program by the United States. Missions in the program are aimed at exploration of the Moon, including crewed and robotic exploration of the lunar surface. Three flights of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle are currently planned for launch in the Artemis program in the early 2020s, beginning with Artemis 1. Before Artemis was named, the flights were referred to as "Orion missions". Numerous supporting scientific and technology demonstration missions are planned for launch under the program's Commercial Lunar Payload Services, in addition to planned and proposed uncrewed logistical missions to construct and resupply the Lunar Gateway and its expendable and reusable lunar landers in lunar orbit.

Main missions

Mission Launch date Crew Launch vehicle[a] Launch pad Duration[b]
Artemis 1
Artemis 1 insignia
2021[1] N/A SLS Block 1 Crew Kennedy LC-39B ~25d
Maiden flight of the SLS, carrying an uncrewed Orion capsule and thirteen CubeSats selected through several programs.[2][3][4] The payloads will be sent on a trans-lunar injection trajectory.[5][6]
Artemis 2 Q4 2022[7] TBA SLS Block 1 Crew Kennedy LC-39B ~10d
First crewed flight, carrying four crew members along with numerous CubeSats to be selected through the CubeSat Launch Initiative.[8][9]
Artemis 3 2024 TBA SLS Block 1 Crew[10] Kennedy LC-39B ~30d
Carrying the Artemis 3 mission hardware, expected to be the first lunar landing of the Artemis program.[11][10]
Artemis 4 (Proposed[12]) 2025 TBA SLS Block 1B Crew Kennedy LC-39B ~30d
Debut of the SLS Block 1B and the Exploration Upper Stage.[13]
Artemis 5 (Proposed) 2026 TBA SLS Block 1B Crew Kennedy LC-39B ~30d
Artemis 6 (Proposed) 2027 TBA SLS Block 1B Crew Kennedy LC-39B ~30d
Artemis 7 (Proposed) 2028 TBA SLS Block 1B Crew Kennedy LC-39B >60d

Support missions

Surface missions

Peregrine (left) and Nova-C (right) will be the first two robotic landers to directly support the Artemis program

The Commercial Lunar Payload Services (CLPS) program will support the Artemis program by landing several small payloads focused on scouting for lunar resources, in situ resource utilization (ISRU) experiments and lunar science, in preparation for an extended human presence on the lunar surface.[14][15][16]

List of CLPS missions
Mission Launch date Operator Lander Rover Launch pad Launch vehicle[a] Duration[b] References
Peregrine Mission One July 2021 Astrobotic Peregrine Cape Canaveral SLC-41 Vulcan[17] [18][19]
IM-1 October 2021 Intuitive Machines Nova-C Kennedy LC-39A Falcon 9 [20]
TBA Late 2022 Masten Space Systems XL-1 TBA TBA [21]
Griffin Mission One Late 2023[22] Astrobotic[22] Griffin[22] VIPER TBA ≈100 Earth days [23]

Logistics missions

Artist's impression of the Power and Propulsion Element, the first module of the Lunar Gateway, in lunar orbit. It will generate 50 kW (67 hp) of solar electric power for its ion thrusters, life support, and other systems.

Uncrewed missions to assemble and resupply the Lunar Gateway will be executed as part of the Artemis program.[24]

List of Gateway logistics missions
Launch date Payload
2022 Power and Propulsion Element
2023 Minimal Habitation Module
2024 Expendable lander ascent module[25] for Artemis 3
2024 Expendable lander descent module[25]
2024 Expendable lander transfer module[25]
Proposed missions[12]
2025 Expendable lander descent module for Artemis 4
2025 Reusable lander ascent module
2025 Reusable lander transfer module
2026 Expendable lander descent module for Artemis 5
2026 Refuel for ascent module
2026 Refuel for transfer module
2027 Expendable lander descent module for Artemis 6
2027 Refuel for ascent module
2027 Refuel for transfer module
2028 Refuel for ascent module for Artemis 7
2028 First refuel for transfer module
2028 Second refuel for transfer module
2028 Reusable descent module

See also

References

Notes

  1. ^ a b Serial number displayed in parentheses.
  2. ^ a b Time displayed in days, hours, minutes, and seconds.

Sources

  1. Bridenstine, Jim; Grush, Loren (2019). "NASA administrator on new Moon plan: 'We're doing this in a way that's never been done before'". The Verge. Archived from the original on 25 May 2019. Retrieved 25 May 2019.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  2. Berger, Eric (20 May 2019). "NASA's full Artemis plan revealed: 37 launches and a lunar outpost". Ars Technica. Archived from the original on 23 May 2019. Retrieved 23 May 2019.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  3. Foust, Jeff (24 May 2019). "NASA Has a Full Plate of Lunar Missions Before Astronauts Can Return to Moon". Space.com. Archived from the original on 25 May 2019. Retrieved 25 May 2019.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)
  4. Hill, Bill (27 August 2018). "Exploration Systems Development Update" (PDF). National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Retrieved 17 October 2018.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)

Citations

  1. ^ Grush, Loren (22 January 2020). "NASA administrator on the year ahead: "a lot of things have to go right"". The Verge. Retrieved 22 January 2020.
  2. ^ Hambleton, Kathryn; Newton, Kim; Ridinger, Shannon (2 February 2016). "NASA Space Launch System's First Flight to Send Small Sci-Tech Satellites into Space". NASA. Retrieved 3 February 2016.
  3. ^ Foust, Jeff (21 May 2019). "In 2020, NASA Will Send Living Things to Deep Space for First Time Since Apollo". Space.com. Archived from the original on 6 August 2019. Retrieved 6 August 2019.
  4. ^ Northon, Karen (9 June 2017). "Three DIY CubeSats Score Rides on Exploration Mission-1". National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Archived from the original on 6 August 2019. Retrieved 6 August 2019.
  5. ^ Crane, Aimee (11 June 2019). "Artemis 1 Flight Control Team Simulates Mission Scenarios". National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Archived from the original on 6 August 2019. Retrieved 6 August 2019. ...after the Space Launch System performs the Trans-Lunar Injection burn that sends the spacecraft out of Earth orbit and toward the Moon.
  6. ^ Clark, Stephen (22 July 2019). "First moon-bound Orion crew capsule declared complete, major tests remain". SpaceflightNow. Archived from the original on 6 August 2019. Retrieved 6 August 2019. The Artemis 1 mission profile. Credit: NASA [...] The Artemis 1 mission will send the Orion spacecraft into a distant retrograde lunar orbit and back...
  7. ^ UNITED STATES COMMERCIAL LAUNCH MANIFEST (28 Oct 2019)
  8. ^ Hill, Denise (6 August 2019). "NASA's CubeSat Launch Initiative Opens Call for Payloads on Artemis 2 Mission". National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Archived from the original on 6 August 2019. Retrieved 6 August 2019. NASA is seeking proposals from U.S. small satellite developers to fly their CubeSat missions as secondary payloads aboard the SLS on the Artemis 2 mission under the agency's CubeSat Launch Initiative (CSLI).
  9. ^ Klotz, Irene (5 August 2019). "NASA Scouting Cubesats For Artemis-2 Mission". Aviation Week. Archived from the original on 6 August 2019. Retrieved 6 August 2019. NASA on Aug. 5 released a solicitation for cubesats to ride along with the first crewed flight of the Space Launch System rocket and Orion capsule, with the caveat that selected projects fill strategic knowledge gaps for future lunar and Mars exploration.
  10. ^ a b Boeing Space (31 July 2019). "Farther and faster: The next stage of America's Moon rocket is taking shape to dramatically reduce travel time in space and carry more on a single flight. The Boeing-built @NASA_SLS Exploration Upper Stage will fly on Artemis-3.pic.twitter.com/pNye8izfiE". Twitter. Retrieved 31 July 2019.
  11. ^ Grush, Loren (22 May 2018). "The first three missions of NASA's next big rocket will have to settle for a less-powerful ride". The Verge. Archived from the original on 6 August 2019. Retrieved 6 August 2019. But now NASA is going to fly all three missions — EM-1, EM-2, and Europa Clipper — on Block 1. [...] According to the memo, NASA will aim to have the second platform ready for a Block 1B launch in the beginning of 2024.
  12. ^ a b Berger 2019, [Illustration] "NASA's "notional" plan for a human return to the Moon by 2024, and an outpost by 2028."
  13. ^ Loff, Sarah (15 October 2019). "NASA Commits to Future Artemis Missions With More SLS Rocket Stages". NASA. Retrieved 16 October 2019.
  14. ^ NASA taps 3 companies for commercial moon missions. William Harwood, CBS News. 31 May 2019.
  15. ^ NASA awards contracts to three companies to land payloads on the moon. Jeff Foust, Space News. 31 May 2019
  16. ^ "NASA Expands Plans for Moon Exploration: More Missions, More Science". NASA. Retrieved 4 June 2018.
  17. ^ "Astrobotic Selects United Launch Alliance Vulcan Centaur Rocket to Launch its First Mission to the Moon" (Press release). United Launch Alliance. 19 August 2019. Retrieved 20 August 2019.
  18. ^ Potter, Sean (31 May 2019). "NASA Selects First Commercial Moon Landing Services for Artemis". NASA. Retrieved 3 June 2019.
  19. ^ Berger, Eric (31 May 2019). "NASA picks three companies to attempt Moon landings in 2020 and 2021". Ars Technica. Retrieved 3 June 2019.
  20. ^ Kanayama, Lee (13 April 2020). "NOVA-C selects landing site, Masten gains CLPS contracts". NASASpaceFlight. Retrieved 3 May 2020.
  21. ^ Masten wins NASA lunar lander award Jeff Foust, SpaceNews. 8 April 2020.
  22. ^ a b c "NASA Selects Astrobotic to Fly Water-Hunting Rover to the Moon". NASA. 11 June 2020. Retrieved 24 June 2020.
  23. ^ New VIPER Lunar Rover to Map Water Ice on the Moon. Sarah Loff, NASA. 25 October 2019.
  24. ^ Foust 2019, "After Artemis 3, NASA would launch four additional crewed missions to the lunar surface between 2025 and 2028. Meanwhile, the agency would work to expand the Gateway by launching additional components and crew vehicles and laying the foundation for an eventual moon base."
  25. ^ a b c Gateway Update. NASA Advisory Council. Human Exploration and Operations Committee. Jason Crusan. 7 December 2018.

External links

  • Artemis program at NASA