List of United States Space Force three-star generals

Summary

This is a complete list of three-star generals in the United States Space Force. The rank of lieutenant general (or three-star general) is the second-highest rank achievable in the U.S. Space Force, and the first to have a specific number of authorized positions for it set by statute. It ranks above major general (two-star general) and below general (four-star general).

Flag of a Space Force
lieutenant general

There have been 6 lieutenant generals in the U.S. Space Force. All 6 achieved that rank while on active duty in the U.S. Space Force, and all were commissioned via identical paths to Air Force commissioned officers: 3 via the U.S. Air Force Academy (USAFA), and 3 via Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) at a civilian university.

List of generalsEdit

Entries in the following list of lieutenant generals are indexed by the numerical order in which each officer was promoted to that rank while on active duty, or by an asterisk (*) if the officer did not serve in that rank while on active duty in the U.S. Space Force or was promoted to four-star rank while on active duty in the U.S. Space Force. Each entry lists the general's name, date of rank,[1] active-duty positions held while serving at three-star rank,[2] number of years of active-duty service at three-star rank (Yrs),[3] year commissioned and source of commission,[4] number of years in commission when promoted to three-star rank (YC),[5] and other biographical notes (years of birth and death are shown in parentheses in the Notes column).[6] Lieutenant generals of the U.S. Air Force who transferred to the Space Force in the equivalent grade or promoted to grade after transfer to the Space Force are included.

List of U.S. Space Force three-star generals
# Name Photo Date of rank [1] Position [2] Yrs [3] Commission [4] YC [5] Notes [6]
1 Nina M. Armagno   6 Aug 2020[7] 2 1988 (USAFA) 32 (1966–        ) First female general officer in the Space Force.
2 William J. Liquori Jr.   7 Aug 2020  
  • Deputy Chief of Space Operations, Strategy, Plans, Programs, Requirements, and Analysis (DCSO S5/8/9), 2020–present.
2 1991 (AFROTC) 29 (1969–        )
3 B. Chance Saltzman   7 Aug 2020  
  • Deputy Chief of Space Operations, Operations, Cyber, and Nuclear (DCSO S2/3/4/6/7/10), 2020–present.
2 1991 (AFROTC) 29 (1969–        ) First lieutenant general in the Space Force and first general officer commissioned into the service.[8]
4 Stephen N. Whiting   21 Oct 2020   2 1989 (USAFA) 31 (1967–        )
5 John E. Shaw   23 Nov 2020   2 1990 (USAFA) 30 (1968–        ) First Space Force lieutenant general with a joint duty assignment.
6 Michael A. Guetlein   13 Aug 2021   1 1991 (AFROTC) 30 (1967–        )

TimelineEdit

OverviewEdit

 
Maj. Gen. B. Chance Saltzman is presented his three-star flag during his promotion ceremony at the Pentagon on 14 August 2020.

The rank of lieutenant general in the United States Space Force is identical to its equivalents in the Army, Marine Corps and Air Force in that it is strictly ex officio, tied to positions requiring the officeholder to hold said rank. As a result, upon vacating such a position, the officeholder is reduced to their highest permanent grade, but may retain their temporary grade outside of statutory limits for up to 60 days pending reassignment to a position of equal or higher importance.[9]

The first three-star general in the Space Force was B. Chance Saltzman, who was promoted on 14 August 2020 with date of rank on 7 August.[10]

Both initial general officer setups for the Space Force provided for six lieutenant generals in the new service.[11] This goal fully materialized in August 2021, with the promotion of Michael Guetlein to lieutenant general as commander of the Space Systems Command.[12]

Three-star positionsEdit

Structure of the United States Space Force#Field commandStructure of the United States Space ForceUnified combatant command

Three-star generalsEdit

Michael A. GuetleinJohn E. ShawStephen N. WhitingWilliam J. Liquori Jr.B. Chance SaltzmanNina M. ArmagnoWar in Afghanistan (2001–2021)

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Dates of rank are taken, where available, from the officer's official Space Force biography. The date listed is that of the officer's first promotion to lieutenant general. If such a date cannot be found, the next date substituted should be that of the officer's assumption of his/her first three-star appointment. Failing which, the officer's first Senate confirmation date to lieutenant general should be substituted.
  2. ^ a b Positions listed are those held by the officer when promoted to lieutenant general. Dates listed are for the officer's full tenure, which may predate promotion to three-star rank or postdate retirement from active duty.
  3. ^ a b The number of years of active-duty service at three-star rank is approximated by subtracting the year in the "Date of rank" column from the last year in the "Position" column. For those presently in their position, values are as of 2021. Time spent between active-duty three-star assignments is not counted.
  4. ^ a b Sources of commission are listed in parentheses after the year of commission and include: the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA); Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps (AFROTC) at a civilian university; AFROTC at a senior military college such as Texas A&M University (Texas A&M), the Virginia Military Institute (VMI), or Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (VPI); Air Force Officer Training School (OTS); and direct commission (direct).
  5. ^ a b The number of years in commission before being promoted to three-star rank is approximated by subtracting the year in the "Commission" column from the year in the "Date of rank" column.
  6. ^ a b Notes include years of birth and death; awards of the Medal of Honor, Congressional Gold Medal, Presidential Medal of Freedom, or honors of similar significance; major government appointments; university presidencies or equivalents; familial relationships with other significant military officers or significant government officials such as U.S. Presidents, cabinet secretaries, U.S. Senators, or state governors; and unusual career events such as premature relief or death in office.
  7. ^ Actual promotion ceremony held on 17 August 2020.
  8. ^ While Saltzman's date of rank is effective 7 August 2020 (one day after Nina Armagno's date of rank), he was actually promoted to lieutenant general in the Space Force on 14 August 2020, three days before Armagno's promotion ceremony on 17 August. Staff Sgt. James Richardson (14 August 2020). "U.S. Space Force promotes first general officer". U.S. Space Force. Secretary of the Air Force Public Affairs.
  9. ^ 10 U.S.C. § 601 - Positions of importance and responsibility: generals and lieutenant generals; admirals and vice admirals.
  10. ^ "U.S. Space Force promotes first general officer". United States Space Force. 14 August 2021. Retrieved 21 December 2021.
  11. ^ "A Separate Space: Creating a Military Service for Space" (PDF). RAND Corporation. 2020. p. 67.
  12. ^ Strout, Nathan (15 July 2021). "Biden nominates deputy director of the National Reconnaissance Office to lead new Space Systems Command". www.c4isrnet.com. Retrieved 21 December 2021.