List of Welsh saints

Summary

This list of Welsh saints includes Christian saints with Welsh connections, either because they were of Welsh origin and ethnicity or because they travelled to Wales from their own homeland and became noted in their hagiography for their work there.[1]

The pagan Celts of Britain had already been extensively Christianized during the Roman period: although only four victims of Diocletian's persecution are now known (Saints Alban, "Amphibalus", and Julius and Aaron),[2] Britons met the pagan Saxon invaders largely as Christians prior to being driven back to Wales, Cornwall, and Brittany. The family of Vortigern, which continued to hold Powys in the early medieval period, produced numerous saints. Although they largely refrained from missionizing among the Germans, Welsh refugees and missionaries were responsible for the Christianization of Ireland[3] and Brittany.[4]

The title of "saint" was used quite broadly in the Celtic churches. Extreme cases are Irish accounts of Gerald of Mayo's presiding over 3300 "saints" and Welsh claims that Bardsey held the remains of 20 000.[6] More often, the title was given to the founder of any ecclesiastical settlement, which would thenceforth be known as their llan. Such communities were organized on tribal models: founding saints were almost invariably lesser members of local dynasties and their successors chosen from among their kin. The golden age of such establishments was the 6th century, when the "Three Saintly Families of Wales"—those of the invading Irish Brychan and Northerners Cunedda and Caw—displaced many of the local Silurian rulers in favor of their families and clans.[7] By some estimates,[8] these traditions produced over 800 pre-congregational saints venerated locally in Wales, but invasions by Saxons, Irishmen, Vikings, Normans, and others destroyed many ecclesiastical records. Similarly, the distance from Rome, suspicion of Celtic Christianity, and the relative disconnect of the local sees from Rome has left only two Welsh saints in the General Roman Calendar: Saints David (Dewi) and Winifred (Gwenffrewi).

List of saintsEdit

Name fl. Shrine or
Associated Church
Saint's Day
(Gŵyl Mabsant)
Royal origins Notes
Aaron of Aleth 6th century Cézembre (Brittany) 22 June (trad.[9]) Mentor of Saint Malo
Aaron of Caerleon 3rd century
4th century
Caerleon 1 July (trad.[10])
20 June (mod.[11][12])
Martyred with Saint Julius
Adwen
or Adwenna
5th century
6th century
Advent (Cornwall) Daughter of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog Sometimes conflated with Saint Dwynwen
Aeddan Foeddog
or Aidan
or Maedoc
6th century
7th century
Ferns (Ireland)
Enniscorthy (Ireland)
31 January (trad.[13][14]) Son of Saint Aneurin, son of Caw[15] "Aeddan Maedoc"[14]
Disciple of Saint David
Aelhaiarn
or Aelhaearn
7th century Guilsfield
Llanaelhaearn
2 November (trad.[16]) Descendant of Vortigern, king of Britain Brother of Saints Cynhaiarn and Llwchaiarn
Disciple of Saint Bueno
Aerdeyrn 6th century Llanelldeyrn Descendant of Vortigern, king of Britain Brother of Saint Ederyn
Aelrhiw 9 September (trad.[17])
Afan of Builth
or Afan Buellt
6th century Llanafan Fawr
Llanfechan
Llanafan
17 or 16 November (trad.[16]) Great-grandson of Cunedda Wledig, king of Gwynedd Bishop and martyr
Cousin of Saint David
Amphibalus 3rd century
4th century
St Albans[18] 25 June (trad.)[19] Priest; converted Saint Alban
Born in Isca (Caerleon)
Ane Child of Caw, king of Strathclyde
Saint Armel
or Arthfael
or Armagilus
6th century Plouharnel (Morbihan, Brittany)
Saint-Armel (Morbihan, Brittany), Plouarzel, (Finistère, Brittany).
16 August Son of Hoel, king of Brittany
Asaph 6th century St Asaph 1 May (trad.[20])
5 or 11 May[citation needed]
Bishop
Bach 7th century Eglwys Fach[22] Hermit
Probably spurious[21]
Baglan 6th century Baglan Son of Ithel Hael, prince of Armorica
Baglan 7th century Llanfaglan Son of Dingad
Baruc
or Barruc
6th century 27 September or 29 November (trad.[17][16])
Beuno
or Bono
7th century Clynnog Fawr 21 or 22 April (trad.[23]) Descendant of Vortigern, king of Britain Abbot
Uncle of Saint Winifred
Bidofydd 26 April (trad.[23]) With Saint Fidalis
Bieuzi 6th century 24 November Disciple of Gildas
Bleddyn
or Bleiddian
or Lupus
29 July (trad.[24]) Bishop
Bodfan 2 January (trad.[13])
Brannoc
or Brannock
6th century Braunton 7 January or 26 June
Brioc 5th century Founder saint of Brittany
Brothen Llanfrothen 15 or 14 October (trad.[17])
Brychan Brycheiniog 5th century King of Brycheiniog Venerated in his generation but of disputed status now.
Husband of Prawst
In Wales, considered the father of Dwynwen; in Cornwall, considered the father of Adwen.
Brynach
or Byrnach
7 April (trad.[23]) Abbot
The translation of his relics was sometimes celebrated separately on 26 June.[20]
Buan 4 August (trad.[25])
Bugi
or Beugi
or Bywgi
or Hywgi
6th century Son of Gwynllyw, king of Gwynllwg Father of Beuno and brother of Cadoc[26]

Cadfan 6th century Llangadfan 1 November (trad.[16]) Grandson of Budic II of Brittany Founding abbot of Tywyn and Bardsey abbeys
Cadfarch 24 October (trad.[17])
Cadoc
or Catwg
5th century Caerleon 24 January (trad.[13]) Abbot of Llancarfan
Cadwaladr Fendigaid
or Cadwalader
7th century Llangadwaladr
Llangadwaladr
12 November (trad.[16]) Son of Cadwallon, king of Gwynedd "Cadwalader the Blessed"
King of Gwynedd
Caffo 6th century Llangaffo Child of King Caw of Strathclyde
Caian Tregaian 25 September (trad.[17])
Saint Cain
or Keyne
or Ceinwen
5th century Cerrigceinwen
Llangeinwen
8 October (trad.[17]) Child of King Caw of Strathclyde Chiefly worked in Cornwall
Callwen 1 November (trad.[16]) Virgin
Cammarch 8 October (trad.[17])
Caradog
or Caradoc
12th century Lawrenny 13 April (trad.[23]) Noble of Brecknockshire Hermit
Carannog
or Carantoc
6th century Llangrannog
Crantock (Cornwall)
15, 16, 17 May, or 15 Jan (trad.[20][13][28]) Great-grandson of Ceredig, king of Ceredigion
Caron Possibly 3rd century Tregaron 5 March (trad.[23]) Possibly the same as Carausius (Roman name). However, Baring-Gould associates him with Ciaran[29] Bishop or King
Cathan
or Cathen
St Cathan's Chapel
Colonsay & Luing
Gigha
17 May (trad.[20])
Cedol 1 November (trad.[16])
Ceidio Child of King Caw of Strathclyde
Ceitho 5 August (trad.[25])
Celynin 6th century Llangelynnin 20 November (trad.[16]) Son of Prince Helig
Ceneu Clydau 15 June (trad.[20]) Son of Corun Bishop of St David's
Cenydd
or Cennydd
or Kenneth
6th century Llangennith
Languidic (Brittany)
5 July Son of "King Dihoc"
(presumably Deroch II of Domnonée)
Cennych 6th century Llangennych
Cewydd 5th century Aberedw
Lancaut
Laleston
1, 2 or 15 July (trad.[24]) Child of King Caw of Strathclyde
Cian 6th century Llangian 11 December (trad.[30])
Cieran
or Ciarán of Saigir
or Kieran
5th century
6th century
Saighir (Ireland) 5 March (trad.[23]) Son of Lugna, a noble of the Osraige An apostle of Ireland
Bishop of Saighir
Ciwa
or Cigwa
or Kywa
or Kew
St Kew (Cornwall)[31] 6 or 8 February[13][32] (trad.) Virgin; sister of St Docco
Clydai 1 November (trad.[16]) Virgin
Clydog
or Clintacus
19 August or 3 Nov (trad.[25][16]) King
Clydwyn
or Cledwyn
6th century Penmachno (formerly) 1 November (trad.[16]) Son of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog King
Clydyn
or Clydau
3 November (trad.[16])
Collen 7th century Llangollen
Langolen (France)
21 or 22 May (trad.[20])
Colman
Corentin 5th century First bishop of Quimper
Cowdra
or Cawrdaf
5 December or 21 Feb (trad.[13][30]) King
Creirwy 5th century Great-granddaughter of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog
Cristiolus 3 December (trad.[16])
Cubert see Gwbert 8th century
Curig 6th century
7th century
16 or 15 June (trad.[20]) Martyr
Celebrated with St Julitta
Cwyfen 3 or 2 or 4 June (trad.[20])
Cwyllog 6th century Llangwyllog Child of Caw, king of Strathclyde
Cybi 6th century 5, 6 or 7 November, or 13 Aug (trad.[16][25]) Abbot
Descended from both Seithenyn, king of Gwyddno, & Brychan, king of Brycheiniog
Cyllin 1st century Son of Caratacus King of Siluria
Father of King Coel
Cynbryd 19 or 20 March (trad.[23]) Martyr
Cynddilig 1 November (trad.[16])
Cyndeyrn
or Kentigern
or Mungo
6th century
7th century
Glasgow 13 January or 25 Jul (trad.[13][24]) Son of Owain, king of Rheged, and Saint Teneu Bishop of St Asaph, Hoddom, & Glasgow
Cynfab 15 November (trad.[16])
Cynfarch Llanfair Dyffryn Clwyd 8 September (trad.[17])
Cynfarwy 7th century Llechgynfarwy 8, 10 or 11 November (trad.[16])
Cyngar
or Congar
6th century Holyhead
Llangefni
7 November (trad.[16])
13 February[citation needed]
Child of Gerren Llyngesog of Dumnonia Abbot
Cynhafal 5 October (trad.[17])
Cynidr 7th century Glasbury 8 December (trad.[30]) Grandson of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog Bishop
Son of Saint Gwladys and brother of Saint Eigon
Cynllo 5th century
6th century
Llangoedmor 17 or 14 July or 8 Aug (trad.[24][25]) Grandson of King Coel King
Cynog 14 or 8 March or 9 Oct (trad.[23][17]) Martyr
Cywair 11 July (trad.[24])
Cynwyl Cynwyl Elfed
Cynwyl Gaeo
30 April (trad.[23]) Descended from Brychan, king of Brycheiniog
David
or Dewi Sant
6th century St David's 1 March (trad.[23]) Great-grandson of Seithenyn, king of Gwyddno, & of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog Patron Saint of Wales
Decuman
or Degyman
7th century Watchet (England)
Williton (England)
27 or 30 August (trad.[25])
27 February[citation needed]
Martyr
Deifer
or Dier
8 March (trad.[23])
Deiniol
or Daniel
6th century Bangor 11 September or 10 Dec (trad.[17][30]) Bishop
Deiniolen 22 or 23 November (trad.[16])
Derfel Gadarn 6th century Llandderfel 5 May (trad.[20])
Deruvian
or Duvian
or Damian
2nd century Merthyr Dyfan (mistakenly)
Llandyfan (mistakenly)
24 May (trad.[20]) Bishop & Confessor
Usually celebrated with St Fagan, with whom he supposedly evangelized Roman Britain at King Lucius's request
Often (mistakenly) conflated with St Dyfan on the authority of Williams
Digain 21 November (trad.[16])
Dilwar 4 February (trad.[13]) Virgin
Dingad 5th century Llandovery 1 November (trad.[16]) Son of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog
Diryng 5th century Child of Caw, king of Strathclyde
Dochelin 8 July (trad.[24])
Dochau
or Dochow
or Dochwy
or Dogwyn
or Docco
5th century Llandough, Cowbridge
Llandough, Penarth
St Kew (Cornwall)[33]
15 February (trad.[13])
Dogfael 31 October or 14 Jun (trad.[17][20])
Dogfan
or Doewan
5th century 13 or 12 July (trad.[24]) Son of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog Martyr
Dominica 8th century 8 May
Dona
or Dwna
Llandona 1 November (trad.[16])
Dubhán
5th century St Dubhán's Church, Hook Head (Ireland)
Dunod
or Dunawd
6th century
7th century
7 September (trad.[17]) Abbot
Dwynwen
or Dweynween
5th century 25 January or 13 Jul (trad.[13][24]) Daughter of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog Virgin
Dwywe 6th century
Dyfan Merthyr Dyfan
Llandyfan
24 May (trad.[20]) Highly obscure
Presumably martyred
Generally confused with St Deruvian
Dyfnan 5th century Llanddyfnan 22 or 24 April (trad.[23])
26 May[citation needed]
Alleged son of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog
Dyfnog Llanrhaeadr-yng-Nghinmeirch 13 February (trad.[13])
Dyfodwg 6th century Llantrisant 25 June
Dyfrig
or Dubricius
5th century
6th century
14 November (trad.[16]) Abbot
The translation of his relics was sometimes separately celebrated on 29 May.[20]
Edeyrn
or Edern
6th century Llanedeyrn 11 November or 6 Jan (trad.[16][13]) Descendant of Vortigern, king of Britain
Edwen 6 November (trad.[16]) Virgin
Egwad 7th century Llangwad
Llanfynydd
Eigen 1st century Llanigon
Eigion 10 September (trad.[17]) Bishop
Eigon 7th century Llanigon Grandson of Brychan Brycheiniog Son of Saint Gwladys, brother of Saint Cynidr
Eigrad 6th century Llaneugrad Child of Caw, king of Strathclyde
Eigron 5th century Llanigon
(Cornwall)
Child of Caw, king of Strathclyde
Eilian 6th century Llaneilian 13 January (Orth.) A Roman who emigrated to Anglesey to live as a hermit
Einion Frenin 5th century
6th century
Llanengan 9 or 10 February (trad.[13]) Descendant of Cunedda, king of Gwynedd "Einion the King": King of Llyn (& possibly Anglesey)
Brother of Saints Meirion and Seiriol
Elaeth
or Eleth
6th century Amlwch 10 or 11 November (trad.[16]) King of a realm in northern Britain who fled to Wales
Elen 4th century Daughter of Eudaf Hen Wife of Magnus Clemens Maximus
Married into the family of Brychan
Elfan 26 September (trad.[17])
Elfin Warrington (England)
Elian
or Elien
5th century Llanelian 13 January (trad.[13])
Elledeyrn 4th century Descendant of Vortigern, king of Britain
Elli 6th century Llanelli 23 January (trad.[13]) Abbot
Saint Eluned
or Eiliwedd
or Almedha
5th century Slwch Tump 1 August (trad.[25]) Daughter of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog Martyr and virgin
Elvis
of Eilfyw
or Ailbe
6th century St Elvis
Elwad 22 March (trad.[23])
Elyw
or Eliw
14 or 17 July (trad.[23])
Endelienta
or Endellion
5th century
6th century
Church of St Endelienta, St Endellion (Cornwall) Daughter of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog
Enoder St Enoder (Cornwall)
Enodoch 6th century 7 March
Erbin 5th century 29 May or 13 Jan (trad.[13][20]) King of Dumnonia
Erfyl
or Urfyl
Llanerfyl 6 July (trad.[24])
Eugrad 6th century Child of Caw, king of Strathclyde
Eurgain 29 June (trad.[20])
Ewryd 31 January (trad.[13])
Fagan
or Ffagan
or Fugatius
2nd century St Fagans 24 May or 8 Aug (trad.[20][25])
26 May[citation needed]
Bishop & Confessor
Usually celebrated with St Deruvian, with whom he supposedly evangelized Roman Britain at King Lucius's request
Often (mistakenly) connected with St Dyfan on the authority of Williams
Ffinian
or Finian
5th century 23 February[citation needed]
Ffraid
or Bridget
or Bride
or Bhrid
5th century
6th century
Llansantffraed
Llansantffraid
Llansantffraid-ym-Mechain
1 February (trad.[13]) Irish patron saint. Nun and abbess.
Fidalis 26 April (trad.[23]) With Saint Bidofydd
Finan
of Ffinan
6th century 17 or 13 February or 11 Dec (trad.[13][30])
18 March[citation needed]
Bishop
Flewyn
or Fflewin
or Fflewyn
6th century Llanfflewin 12 December (trad.[30]) Son of Ithel Hael
Foeddog
or Maeddog
or Maedoc
6th century Child of Caw, king of Strathclyde
Gafran 6th century [34] Son-in-law of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog
Gallgo 27 November (trad.[16])
Gallo 5th century Child of Caw, king of Strathclyde
Garmon
or Germanus of Auxerre
4th century Llanarmon-yn-Iâl 31, 13, 14 or 30 July, or 1 Oct or 27 or 28 May (trad.[24][17][20]) Bishop
Credited with leading an army of Britons against invading Picts
Gelert 7th century Llangeler
Beddgelert
29 June
Gildas or Aneurin c. 500–570 Child of Caw, king of Strathclyde. Possibly the poet Aneirin. Credited in Wales as the father of Saint Aeddan[14]|
Gistilian
or Gistlian
2 or 4 March (trad.[23]) Bishop
Gofor 9 May (trad.[20])
Gollen
or Colin
Llangollen
Govan 6th century St. Govan's Head

Gredifael 6th century Penmynydd 13 or 22 November (trad.[16]) Son of Ithel Hael
Grwst 1 December (trad.[30])
Guirec 6th century Perros-Guirec
Gurthiern 5th century Quimperlé 3 July Cousin of Vortigern, king of Britain
Gwbert 8th century Gwbert-on-Sea 4 October (trad.) Venerated also at Cubert, Cornwall; Cubert is said to have been a monk who came from Wales and assisted Carantoc in evangelizing that district; later returned to his monastery and became abbot and died in 775 AD; feast at Cubert is on Sunday following 4 Oct.[35][36][37]
Gwen
or Wenna
5th century Wife of Salomon of Cornwall
Mother of Saint Cybi & aunt of Saint David
Gwenafwy 6th century 1 July Daughter of Caw, king of Strathclyde
Gwenfaen 3, 4 or 5 November (trad.[16]) Virgin
Gwenfyl 1 November (trad.[16]) Virgin
Gwynhoedl 1 January (trad.[13])
Gwenllian 5th century Daughter of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog Great-grandmother of Saints Deinol and Cynwl
Gwenlleu 1 November (trad.[16]) Bishop
Gwenllwyfo 7th century Llanwenllwyfo
Gwenog 3 January (trad.[13]) Virgin
Gwenrhiw 1 November (trad.[16]) Virgin
Gwladys 6th century Daughter of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog Queen of Gwynllyw
Mother of saints Cynidr and Eigon
Gwrda 5 December (trad.[30])
Gwrddelw Llanddewi Brefi 7 January (trad.[13]) Child of Caw, king of Strathclyde
Gwrfyw Bangor (formerly) Son of Pasgen
Gwrhai 5th century Child of Caw, king of Strathclyde
Gwrnerth 7 April (trad.[23]) With Saint Llywelyn
Gwrthwl
or Mwthwl
2 March (trad.[23])
Gwyrd 1 November (trad.[16]) Friar
Gwyddelan 22 August (trad.[25])
Gwyddfarch 3 November (trad.[16])
Gwynan
or Gwynen
13 December (trad.[30]) Commemorated with Saint Gwynws
Conflated with Saint Gwynin
Gwynin Dwygyfylchi 31 December (trad.[30])
Gwynllyw Filwr or Gundleus
(Eng Woolos or Woolo)
5th century Newport Cathedral, St Woolos 29 or 28 February (trad.[13])
29 March (mod.)
King of Gwynllwg Husband of Gwladys, father of Cadoc and others[38]

Gwynno 6th century Llantrisant
Llanwynno
26 October
Gwynog 22, 23 or 24 October (trad.[17]) Commemorated with Saint Noethon
Gwynws 13 December (trad.[30]) Commemorated with Saint Gwynan
Henwg 5th century Llanhennock Supposed links to King Arthur and Constantine
Huail 6th century Son of Caw, king of Strathclyde
Hychan 8 August (trad.[25])
Hywel 6th century Llanhywel
Llanllowell
Son of Emyr Llydaw, king of Brittany King
Idloes Llanidloes 6 September (trad.[17])
Iestyn 6th century
7th century
Llaniestyn
Llaniestyn
Ilar
or Hilary
6th century Llanilar
Trefilan
13, 14 or 15 January (trad.[13]) Martyr
Possibly Bretish companion of Saint Cadfan
Ilid Llanilid
Illog 8 August (trad.[25])
Illtud
or Illtyd
5th century Llantwit Major 6 November (trad.)
Ina 5th century Llanina 1 February (trad.[13][39]) Granddaughter of Cunedda Wledig, king of Gwynedd
Isan 6th century Llanishen Disciple of Saint Illtyd
Isfael
or Ismael
6th century St Ishmaels 16 June (trad.[20]) Son of Budig Bishop
Disciple of Saint David
Issel 6th century Saundersfoot Father of Saints Gwen Teirbron and Teilo
Grandfather of Euddogwy, Tyfei, Isfael, Gwenthenoc, Jacut, Winwaloe
Issui 30 October (trad.[17]) Martyr
Ithel Hael 6th century Prince of Armorica
Father of numerous saints
Jacut 5th century Saint-Jacut-de-la-Mer Great-grandson of Brychan Brycheiniog
John Roberts 1577–1610 25 October Monk and priest
Born Trawsfynydd, 1577
Martyred at Tyburn 1610[40]
John Lloyd ?–1679 25 October Priest and martyr
Executed Cardiff, 1679[41]
Julitta 16 or 15 June (trad.[20]) Martyr
Celebrated with St Curig
Julius 4th century Caerleon 1 July (trad.[10]
20 June (mod.[11][12])
Martyred with Saint Aaron of Caerleon
Justinian
or Stinan
6th century Llanstinan
Saint David's
5 December (trad.[30])
Juthwara 6th century Sherborne Abbey Sister of Saints Sidwell and Wulvela
Keina 7 October (trad.[17]) Virgin
Kevoca
Llamined Angel 7th century Son of Pasgen Claimed by Venedotian tribes[citation needed]
Brother of Saint Gwrfyw
Llawddog
or Lleuddad
15 January (trad.[13]) Abbot
Llechid 6th century Llanllechid 1 December (trad.[30]) Child of Ithel Hael
Llibio 5th century 28 February (trad.[13])
Llily 7th century 3 March
Llwchaiarn
or Lluwchaiarn
7th century 12 or 11 January (trad.[13])
Llwydian 19 November (trad.[16])
Llwni 11 August (trad.[25])
Llyr 21 October (trad.[17]) Virgin
Llywelyn 7 April or 12 Dec (trad.[23][30]) With Saint Gwrnerth
Lythan St Lythans
Mabyn
or Mabena
5th century St Mabyn (Cornwall) Daughter of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog
Machraith 1 January (trad.[13])
Madoc 7th century 31 January
Madron 6th century Madron (Cornwall) 17 May
Madrun
or Materiana
5th century
Maël 5th century
6th century
Corwen 13 or 12 May (trad.[20]) Hermit
Celebrated with St Sulien
Maelog 6th century Llanfaelog 31 December (trad.[30]) Child of Caw, king of Strathclyde
Maelrhys
or Maelrys
or Maelerw
Bardsey Island 1 January (trad.[13])
Maethlu 26 December (trad.[30])
Maidoc 28 February (trad.[13]) Bishop
Not to be conflated with Aeddan Foeddog of Ferns
Mallonius 4th century Rouen 22 October
Saint Malo
or Machudd
or Machutus
5th century 15 November (trad.[16]) Disciple of Saint Aaron
Mannacus 6th century
Marnock 6th century
Materiana
or Madrun
or Madryn
5th century Minster (Cornwall) 9 April Daughter of Saint Vortimer, king of Gwent
Mawgan 5th century 8 August
Mawnan 7th century 18 December
Mechell
or Mechyll
6th century Llanfechell 15 or 14 November (trad.[16]) Possibly Bretish
Meddwid
or Moddwid
27 August (trad.[25])
Medwy 1 January (trad.[13]) Bishop
Meilig 6th century Llowes 14 or 12 November (trad.[16]) Child of Caw, king of Strathclyde
Meirion
or Meirian
4 February (trad.[13])
Melaine 6th century St Mellion
Mullion
Melangell
or Monacella
6th century Pennant Melangell 27 May or 4 or 31 Jan (trad.[13][20]) Virgin
Abbess
Mellonius 4th century 22 October
Melyd
or Melydyn
9 May (trad.[20])
Menefrida 5th century St Minver (Cornwall) Daughter of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog
Merin
or Merryn
6th century St Merryn
Lanmerin
Plomelin
6 January (trad.[13]) Child of Seithenyn, king of Gwyddno
Mereweenna 6th century 6 July Daughter of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog
Mordeyrn 25 July (trad.[24])
Mylling 17 June (trad.[20])
Mylor
or Melor
6th century 1 October
Meugan 25 or 26 September, 14 Feb, 24 or 15 Apr or 18 Nov (trad.[17][13][23][16])
Morhaiarn 1 November (trad.[16])
Mwrog 24 or 26 September (trad.[17])
Mynver 6th century 4 November
Nectan 5th century Hartland (England) Eldest son of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog
Nidan 7th century Llanidan 30 September (trad.[17]) Grandchild of Pasgen
Noethan
or Noethon
22, 23 or 24 October (trad.[17]) Commemorated with Saint Gwynog
Non
or Nonita
5th century Chapel of St Non
Altarnun (Cornwall)
3 March (trad.[23]) Great-granddaughter of Seithenyn, king of Gwyddno Mother of Saint David
Noyale 6th century 6 July
Oudoceus 7th century Llandaff
Llandogo
2 July (trad.[24]) Bishop
Pabo Post Prydain 9 November (trad.[16])
Padarn 6th century Llanbadarn Fawr 16, 15 or 17 April or 12 Nov (trad.[23][16]) Founder saint of Brittany
Bishop
His ordination was also sometimes celebrated as a separate holiday on 23 September.[17]
Padrig
or Patrick
17 March[23] Patron saint of Ireland
Bishop
Patern 5th century Companion of Saint David
Paulinus 6th century Founder saint of Brittany
Peblig 5th century Llanbeblig 3 or 2 July (trad.[24]) Son of Magnus Clemens Maximus Son of Saint Elen Luyddog
Pedrog
or Petroc
or Petrock
6th century Bodmin (Cornwall) 4 June (trad.[20]) Patron saint of Cornwall
Abbot
Peirio 5th century
6th century
Rhosbeirio Child of Caw, king of Strathclyde
Peris 6th century Nant Peris 11 December or 26 Jul (trad.[30][24]) Child of Helig of Tyno Helig
Peulan 6th century Llanbeulan 2 or 1 November (trad.[16])
Pol Aurelian 5th century Son of Porphyrius Student of Saint Iltud
Bishop
Philip Evans 1645–1679 25 October Priest and martyr
Born Monmouth, 1645
Executed Cardiff, 1679[41]
Polin 22 November (trad.[16]) Bishop
Pyr 6th century Caldey Island
Rhediw 11 November (trad.[16])
Rhian 8 March (trad.[23]) Bishop
Rhuddlad 4 September (trad.[17]) Virgin
Rhwydrys 1 November (trad.[16])
Rhychwyn 5th century Llanrhychwyn 12 June (trad.[20]) Brother of Celynin
Sadwrn 6th century 29 November (trad.[16])
25 October[citation needed]
Saeran 13 January (trad.[13])
Samson of Dol 5th century
Samson of York 6th century 28 July (trad.[24]) Son of Caw, king of Strathclyde Bishop
Sannan
or Sanan
13 or 7 June or 8 Mar or 29 Apr (trad.[20][23])
Sawyl
or Saul
15 January (trad.[13])
Sefin 5th century Daughter of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog Grandmother of Saints David and Cybi
Seiriol 6th century Penmon
Puffin Island
1 February (trad.[13]) Descended from Cunedda, king of Gwynedd Brother of Saints Einion Frenin and Meirion
Abbot at Penmon
Sidwell or Sativola 6th century Exeter, Devon 31 July Sister of Saints Juthwara and Wulvela
Silin
or Giles
1 September or 1 Oct or 27 Jan (trad.[17][13]) Abbot or bishop
Sulien 2 September (trad.[17])
Tanwg 6th century Llandanwg Son of Ithel Hael
Tathan
or Tatheus
6th century 26 December (trad.[30]) Abbot
Irish missionary to Wales
Tathana 5th century Granddaughter of Meuric ap Tewdric of Trebeferad Associated with Saint Iltud
Tathyw 5th century Caerwent
St Athan
Teath 5th century St Teath (Cornwall) Daughter of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog
Tecwyn
or Tegwyn
6th century Llandecwyn 14 September (trad.[17]) Son of Ithel Hael
Tegai 6th century Llandygai Son of Ithel Hael
Tegfedd
or Tegwedd
6th century Llandegveth 18 December (trad.[30]) Virgin
Tegla
or Tecla
Llandegla 1 or 3 June or 23 or 24 Sept (trad.[20][17]) Virgin
Teilo 6th century Llantilio Crossenny
Llantilio Pertholey
Llandeilo Fawr
9 or 7 February or 26 Nov (trad.[13][16]) Child of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog Bishop
Teneu 6th century Glasgow Daughter of Lleuddun, king of Gododdin Mother of Saint Cyndeyrn
Great-grandmother of Saint Winifred
Teulyddog 6th century Disciple of Dyfrig
Teuderius 29 October (trad.[17])
Tewdrig 6th century 3 January (trad.[13])
1 April[citation needed]
King and martyr
Tigernach 6th century 4 April
Trillo 6th century Llandrillo in Denbighshire
Llandrillo-yn-Rhos
15 June (trad.[20]) Son of Ithel Hael Disciple of Saint Cadfan
Trunio 29 June (trad.[20])
Tudno 6th century Llandudno 5 June (trad.[20]) Son of Seithenyn, king of Gwyddno
Tudglyd
or Tudglud
6th century Llandudno
Penmachno
30 May (trad.[20]) Son of Seithenyn, king of Gwyddno
Tudur 14 or 15 October (trad.[17])
Tudwal 5th century Son of Hoel and cousin of the king of Domnonee Bishop
Twrog 6th century Bodwrog
Maentwrog
Llandwrog
26 June (trad.[20]) Son of Ithel Hael
Tybie 5th century 30 January (trad.[13]) Daughter of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog Virgin & martyr
Tydecho Llanymawddwy 17 December (trad.[30])
Tydfil 5th century Merthyr Tydfil 23 August (trad.[25]) Daughter of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog Virgin & martyr
Tyfaelog 26 February (trad.[13])
Tyfanog
or Tauannauc
25 November (trad.[16])
Tyfriog 1 May (trad.[20]) Abbot
Tyfrydog 5th century Llandyfrydog 1 January (trad.[13])
Tygwy 13 January (trad.[13])
Tyneio 6th century Llanfor Child of Seithenyn, king of Gwyddno
Tyrnog Landerneau (Brittany) 4 or 2 April or 26 Jun or Sept 25 (trad.[23][20][17])
Tysilio
or Tyssilio
7th century Llandysilio 8 or 9 November (trad.[16]) Son of Brochwel Ysgithrog Bishop
Tyssil 7th century Llandyssil
Tyssul 31 January or 3 Feb (trad.[13]) Bishop
Ufelwy 6th century Yhuel Grandson of Gildas
Ulo Capelulo
Umbrafel Son of Emyr Llydaw
Urw
or Wrw
21 October (trad.[17]) Virgin
Ustig Child of Caw, king of Strathclyde Associated with Saints Dyfrig and Eldad
Urith 8th century 8 July
Usyllt 6th century Tenby Descendant of Cunedda, king of Gwynedd Father of Saint Teilo
Veep 5th century St Veep (Cornwall) Daughter of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog
Vortimer
or Gwrthefyr Fendigaid
5th century Descendant of Vortigern, king of Britain "Vortimer the Blessed"
King of Gwent
Father of Madrun
Weneppa 6th century Gwennap (Cornwall) Daughter of Caw, king of Strathclyde
Winfrith 6th century Bishop of Lichfield
Winifred
or Gwenfrewi
or Gwenffrewi
7th century Holywell 19 or 20 December or 4 Nov (trad.[30][16])
8 July[citation needed]
Descendant of Vortigern, king of Britain Virgin & martyr
Granddaughter of Saint Teneu and niece of Saint Beuno
Her decollation was frequently celebrated separately on 22 June.[20]
The translation of her relics was frequently celebrated separately on 3 November.[16]
Wethenoc 6th century Great-grandson of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog
Winwaloe 6th century Great-grandson of Brychan, king of Brycheiniog
Wulvela 6th century Sister of Saints Juthwara and Sidwell
Ylched
or Ulched
Llechylched 6 January or 9 May (trad.[13][20])
6 April (Orth.)
Ystyffan
or Stephen
6th century Llansteffan Descendant of Vortigern, king of Britain Associate of Saint Teilo

Other commemorationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ A small number may have had no Welsh connection in their lifetime but have nonetheless become associated with Wales through the depositing of their relics in Welsh religious houses during the Middle Ages.[citation needed]
  2. ^ Although note the etiological legend that Lichfield received its name from having been the site of a martyrdom of thousands under Diocletian.
  3. ^ Baring-Gould (1898), p. 41.
  4. ^ Baring-Gould (1898), p. 26.
  5. ^ Quoted translated from the Latin in Baring-Gould (1898), p. 39.
  6. ^ The Bollandists compiling the Acta Sanctorum were even driven to complain of the Irish "canonising dead men in troops whenever they seemed to be somewhat better than usual".[5]
  7. ^ Baring-Gould, Sabine. The Lives of the Saints, Vol. XVI, "The Celtic Church and its Saints", pp. 30–40. Longmans, Green, & Co. (New York), 1898.
  8. ^ Rowan Williams, Reviews and comments on 'The Book of Welsh Saints'.
  9. ^ Baring-Gould (1908), Vol. I, pp. 103 ff.
  10. ^ a b Baring-Gould, Sabine & al. The Lives of the British Saints: The Saints of Wales and Cornwall and Such Irish Saints as Have Dedications in Britain, Vol. I, pp. 101 ff. Chas. Clark (London), 1908. Hosted at Archive.org. Accessed 18 Nov 2014.
  11. ^ a b The Church in Wales. "The Book of Common Prayer for Use in the Church in Wales: The New Calendar and the Collects". 2003. Accessed 18 Nov 2014.
  12. ^ a b The Catholic Church in England and Wales. "Liturgy Office: February 2015". Catholic Bishops' Conference of England and Wales, 2014. Accessed 18 Nov 2014.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av Baring-Gould (1908), Vol. I, p. 70.
  14. ^ a b c d Baring-Gould (1908), Vol. I, pp. 116 ff.
  15. ^ Although note that Irish sources make him a son of Sedna, a chieftain of Connaught. Baring-Gould considered that the extraordinary span of events credited to "Saint Aeddan" best explained by supposing that Aeddan the grandson of Caw and companion of Saint David was a second figure from Aeddan, son of Sedna, and the two became confused as both were bishops of Ferns a generation apart.[14]
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba Baring-Gould (1908), Vol. I, p. 75.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al Baring-Gould (1908), Vol. I, p. 74.
  18. ^ Ford, David Nash. "The Holy Shrines of St. Albans in Hertfordshire". Britannica. Archived from the original on 31 January 2010. Retrieved 25 April 2015.
  19. ^ Thurston, Herbert (1907). The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. retrieved from "St Alban". New Advent. Retrieved 25 April 2015.
  20. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao Baring-Gould (1908), Vol. I, p. 72.
  21. ^ a b Baring-Gould (1908), Vol. I, p. 212.
  22. ^ Now dedicated to St Martin and probably originally simply a corruption of eglwys y fach, "church in the little [corner of the valley]".[21]
  23. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z Baring-Gould (1908), Vol. I, p. 71.
  24. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Baring-Gould (1908), Vol. I, p. 73.
  25. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Baring-Gould (1908), Vol. I, p. 73.
  26. ^ Baring-Gould, S.; Fisher, John (1907). Lives of the British Saints: Vol 1. Honorable Society of Cymrrodorion. p. 340.
  27. ^ Cornish Church Guide, p. 12. Blackford (Truro).
  28. ^ Sometimes celebrated as a movable feast on the Sunday closest to 16 May.[27]
  29. ^ Baring-Gould, Sabine. The Lives of the British Saints, Vol. II. p. 135.
  30. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v Baring-Gould (1908), Vol. I, pp. 76.
  31. ^ Doble, G.H. Saints of Cornwall, Part 4: Newquay, Padstow, and Bodmin district, pp. 105-109. Dean & Chapter (Truro), 1965.
  32. ^ Cornish Church Guide, p. 10. Blackford (Truro).
  33. ^ Doble, G. H. (1965) Saints of Cornwall, Part 4: Newquay, Padstow and Bodmin district. Truro: Dean & Chapter; pp. 105-109
  34. ^ Baring-Gould (1908), Vol. III, p. 42.
  35. ^ Welsh chronicles
  36. ^ Doble, G. H. (1965) The Saints of Cornwall; Part 4: saints of the Newquay, Padstow and Bodmin district. Truro: Dean and Chapter; p. 50
  37. ^ Cornish Church Guide (1925) Truro: Blackford; p. 14
  38. ^ "Welcome To Newport Cathedral". Newport Cathederal. 3 June 2019. Retrieved 21 March 2021.
  39. ^ Baring-Gould (1908), Vol. III, p. 350.
  40. ^ Thurston, Herbert (1907). The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. retrieved from "St. John Roberts". New Advent. Retrieved 25 April 2015.
  41. ^ a b Thurston, Herbert (1907). The Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. retrieved from "St. John Lloyd". New Advent. Retrieved 25 April 2015.

External linksEdit

  • Welsh Saints at Everything2
  • List of Celtic Saints at Celtic Christianity
  • List of early Welsh Churches at Celtic Christianity