Malicious castration

Summary

Malicious castration is a common law criminal offense consisting of the intentional maiming of another person's genitalia. It is law 14-28 in the state of North Carolina in the United States.

North Carolina law

The state of North Carolina defines malicious castration:

If any person, of malice aforethought, shall unlawfully castrate any other person, or cut off, maim or disfigure any of the privy members of any person, with intent to murder, maim, disfigure, disable or render impotent such person, the person so offending shall be punished as a Class C felon.[1]

North Carolina cases

  • In 2006 Rebecca Arnold Dawson was charged with malicious castration for maiming the genitals of a man with her hands. The man needed 50 stitches.[2]
  • Martinne Delavega claimed self defense in a September 2015 attack on her boyfriend. She had bit his scrotum. She was acquitted in 2018.[3]
  • In September 2019 Victoria Thomas Frabutt used a pruning shears to cut off her husband's penis. She is awaiting trial.[4][5]
  • In August 2019 Candace Grantham was charged with malicious castration. She is awaiting trial.[6]

See also

References

  1. ^ "14-28. Malicious castration". ncleg.gov. North Carolina General Assembly. Retrieved 11 January 2020.
  2. ^ "Woman charged with malicious castration". Associated Press. The Denver Post. 29 December 2006. Retrieved 11 January 2020.
  3. ^ "Jurors find woman not guilty in malicious castration case". Gray Digital Media. WITN. 21 August 2018. Retrieved 11 January 2020.
  4. ^ "US: Woman calls police after castrating her husband". en.crimerussia.com. Crime russia. Retrieved 1 December 2019.
  5. ^ Teller, Sara E. "Two women castrate their husbands while new chemically induced castration laws are growing in popularity". legalreader.com. Legal Reader. Retrieved 11 January 2020.
  6. ^ Bennett, Abbie (9 April 2018). "NC woman accused of 'malicious castration,' rape and a list of other crimes, cops say". The Raleigh News Observer. Retrieved 11 January 2020.