Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art

Summary

The Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art (MSM; formerly known as the Marjorie Barrick Museum of Natural History) is a museum located on the main campus of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), established in 1967.[1] The museum was originally instituted as a natural history museum with a focus on the natural history and environment of Nevada and the broader Southwestern United States.[2] In December 2011, the Barrick joined the UNLV College of Fine Arts and became the anchor of the Galleries at UNLV. The six galleries and one museum that make up the Galleries are each entities in their own right linked via a common administration. The Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art (the Barrick), is a well-known venue for engaging exhibitions and events and promotes engagement with the visual arts among a broad community including UNLV students, faculty, and staff; the greater Las Vegas community; and the national and international art community.

Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art
Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art is located in Nevada
Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art
Location in Nevada
Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art is located in the United States
Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art
Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art (the United States)
Established1967; 55 years ago (1967)
Location4505 Maryland Parkway
UNLV campus, Paradise, Las Vegas NV USA
Coordinates36°06′28″N 115°08′15″W / 36.107696°N 115.137393°W / 36.107696; -115.137393
TypeContemporary Art
Websitebarrickmuseum.unlv.edu/

HistoryEdit

The founding of a natural history museum at the university—then an institution only a decade old, known as Nevada Southern University[3]—began with a collection of specimens from the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the Nevada System of Higher Education's graduate research institute. In September 1967, the DRI opened a small museum facility in premises across from the university's grounds, as part of an expansion of DRI's activities into southern Nevada. The museum was created under the direction of archaeologist Richard H. Brooks, assistant research professor at the university and a researcher (later director) of the DRI-affiliated Nevada Archaeological Survey. Its exhibits consisted of DRI's local collection of living desert animal specimens and Native American artifacts.[4]

In 1969 the university took over the management of the museum from DRI.[5] Brooks remained as director of the university-affiliated museum, and during his tenure, the museum's funding was established and further permanent exhibits acquired.[6] The most significant acquisition occurred in 1979, when a private collection of pre-Columbian art was donated by a former UNLV alumna, Mannetta Braunstein, and her husband Michael. These pieces would form the basis of a broadening collection of Mesoamerican and Aridoamerican cultural artifacts, acquired through other donations and further additions from the Braunsteins' purchases in Latin American markets.[7]

In the late 1970s, the museum began the process of relocating to premises situated on the UNLV campus, to occupy a building that had contained the university's original gymnasium. Renovations to accommodate the museum were completed in 1981. Further alterations and expansions to the building were subsequently undertaken, and a research laboratory wing was added in 1994.[5]

Beginning in 1979 the museum's anthropological collections were greatly expanded, with the subsequent additions of donated collections of ethnographic and archaeological artifacts representing Native American and pre-Columbian Mesoamerican cultures.[8]

Brooks left the position in 1981.[6] His successor as museum director was ornithologist and former UNLV president (1973–78) Donald Baepler, who was returning to the university campus after a three-year term as chancellor of the Nevada university system.[9] Baepler was instrumental in establishing UNLV's Harry Reid Environmental Research Center, and the museum was reorganized to become one of the center's operating divisions. Baepler retired as museum director in 2004, retained a title as emeritus executive director of the museum.[10]

In 1989 the museum was renamed in honor of Marjorie Barrick, a longstanding benefactor of the university.[11] In 1980 Barrick, a prominent philanthropist married to a Las Vegas real estate developer, had gifted UNLV with an endowment of some $1.2 million from her late husband's estate, to fund an ongoing series of public lectures at the university. Speakers at the Barrick Lecture Series have included international figures and heads of state, such as Jimmy Carter, Gerald Ford, Mikhail Gorbachev and F. W. de Klerk.[12]

In 2011, the Barrick closed its doors to undergo a change of hands with departments. The museum ceased to be affiliated with the Harry Reid Center and Department of Archaeology and became a part of the College of Fine Arts at UNLV. It reopened in 2012 as a contemporary art museum after undergoing drastic renovations, from its Collections Room[13] to the Exhibition Hall, which changed how the public was able to interact with the space from piece to piece.[14][15]

After the Las Vegas Art Museum (or LVAM) closed its doors in 2009, their collection was left without a home. In 2012 the LVAM collection moved to the newly renovated Barrick Museum, as part of a partnership between LVAM and UNLV.[16]

In 2017, the Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art celebrated its 50th anniversary.[17] Under the direction of curator and artist, Alisha Kerlin, the Barrick continued to evolve into a notable locus of contemporary art in Southern Nevada. The museum was "rebranded" with "'of Art'" being added to its name and the institution established itself as an inclusive space with significant focus on “interdisciplinary programming,” "experimentation," and "community engagement" that reflects the social diversity of both UNLV and the broader Las Vegas community.[18][19][20] The Barrick defined these aims in their Mission Statement, asserting:

"The Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art believes everyone deserves access to art that challenges our understanding of the present and inspires us to create a future that holds space for us all."[21]

Since 2017, the Barrick has partnered with Clark County School District to increase access to K-12 students, with the Barrick often acting as their introductory experience to a museum.[22][23] In 2020, the Barrick announced its partnership with the Las Vegas Womxn of Color Arts Festival, a Southern Nevada collective that aims to increase opportunities and visibility for “local womxn [sic] artists who are Black, Indigenous, and People of Color.”[24]

Currently, the Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art is Las Vegas' only art museum.[25]

CollectionsEdit

The Collections at the Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art include:

  • The Barrick Art Collection

–The Barrick Museum is committed to collecting art of the present. This commitment is supported entirely through the generosity of artists and collectors who donate in-kind gifts of art. The bulk of the works in the collection include artists with ties to the greater Las Vegas valley forming a heritage collection of works created in and inspired by the Southern Nevada region.[16]

  • The Barrick Cultural Collection

–The cultural collection began to form in 1969 and includes cultural objects from the American Southwest and Mesoamerica. The Pre-Columbian collection was initiated in 1979 with a gift from Dr. Michael C. and Mannetta Braunstein. Today, the museum's holdings include the Dr. Michael C. and Mannetta Braunstein Collection, a comprehensive collection of Pre-Columbian objects from nearly every culture of Pre-Columbian Latin America, as well as Mexican dance masks and retablos; Guatemalan, Bolivian, and Navajo textiles; Paiute and Hopi basketry; and Navajo jewelry. A variety of methodologies have been used at different times to collect, classify, analyze, and describe collection material, and the collections provide rich primary source information for multi-, cross-, and interdisciplinary studies. The Museum is compliant with guidelines mandates by the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA).[16]

  • The LVAM Collection

–Works in the collection include national and international artists such as Llyn Foulkes and William T. Wiley, as well as a significant representation of UNLV graduates.[16]

  • The Vogel Collection

–The Barrick Museum houses the Dorothy and Herbert Vogel 50x50 Collection. In 2010, UNLV was the recipient of 50 contemporary works from the celebrated collectors. Beginning in 1962, New York postal clerk, Herbert Vogel, and his librarian wife, Dorothy, began collecting contemporary works of art. The couple dedicated all of Herb's salary to buying art, and in a few decades had amassed a collection encompassing some 4,000 works. Today, these works form one of the most remarkable collections of contemporary art in America. Motivated by the desire to share their collection with the public, the couple developed a program to gift 50 works to one institution in each of the 50 states. This program became known as Vogel 50x50. The collection includes the work by such notables as Stephen Antonakos, Neil Jenney, Lynda Benglis, Lucio Pozzi, Edda Renouf, Bettina Werner and Richard Tuttle.[16]

ExhibitionsEdit

Exhibitions at the Marjorie Barrick of Art include:

  • 2020
  • Lance L. Smith: In the Interest of Action[26]
  • FUTURE RELICS: Artifacts for a New World[27]
  • Yerman: Peaks & Valleys [28]
  • Excerpts: Works from the Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art[29]
  • Nevada Touring Initiative Exhibition: Still Here Now[30]
  • Ashley Hairston Doughty: Kept to Myself[31]
  • The Other Side of Paradise[32]
  • Mikayla Whitmore: Between a Rock and a Cliff[33]
  • 2019
  • Stars on the Ground: Works by John Torreano[34]
  • Connective Tissue by Amanda Phingbodhipakkiya[35]
  • Zet Gold: On My Mountain[36]
  • Dry Wit[37]
  • Justin Favela and Ramiro Gomez: Sorry for the Mess[38]
  • Human Contact, curated by Samantha Castle[39]
  • Tiger and The Eternal Struggle[40]
  • Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A.[41]
  • 2018
  • Jubilation Inflation[42]
  • Soundscapes[43]
  • Art in Context[44]
  • Andrew Schoultz: In Process: Every Movement Counts[45]
  • Exhibition: Identity Tapestry[46]
  • Exhibition: VESSEL: Ceramics of Ancient West Mexico[47]
  • Exhibition: Plural[48]
  • 2017
  • Peripheral Flood Control Structures of Las Vegas[49]
  • Preservation [50]
  • liminal[51]
  • Tested Ground[52]
  • Casey Roberts[53]
  • Astronomy of the Asphalt Ecliptic[54]
  • Play On Gary, Play On[55]
  • Josh Azzarella Screenings[56]
  • Abandon All Hope, Ye Who Enter Here[57]
  • Process, curated by Matthew Gardocki[58]
  • Masking, curated by Karen Roop[59]
  • 2016
  • Edward Burtynsky: Oil[60]
  • In Transition: Female Figurines from the Michael C. and Mannetta Braunstein Collection[61]
  • Showing the Need for Connection[62]
  • Five[63]
  • Ellsworth Kelly[64]
  • Unseen Selections from LVAM[65]
  • Teaching Gallery Staff Picks[66]
  • 2015
  • Break Ups & Tear Downs[67]
  • Style Moderne: Art Glass from the Ruth and Mel Wolzinger Collection[68]
  • Recent Acquisitions[69]
  • The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection[70]
  • David Sanchez Burr: Citizen Speak[71]
  • Deborah Aschheim: Kennedy Obsession[72]
  • John Millei: If 6 Turned Out To Be 9, Selected Work[73]
  • 2014
  • Reflecting & Projecting: 20 Years of Design Excellence[74]
  • Yesterday & Today[75]
  • Panorama[76]
  • Panorama+ Sesquicentennial Celebration of Nevada: Further Selections from the Nevada Arts Council's Artist Fellowship Program[77]
  • Jerry Lewis: Painted Pictures[78]
  • Sound & Video Installation: Derivative Presence by Yasmina Chavez & Javier Sanchez[79]
  • Private/Public: Images of Devotion from 19th and Early 20th Century Mexico Opening[80]
  • Art for Art's Sake: Selections from the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation[81]
  • 2013
  • Passage to the Future: Art from a New Generation in Japan[82]
  • The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection[83]
  • The Kent Bicentennial Portfolio: Spirit of Independence[84]
  • Pre-Columbian Sacrifice: The Burden of the Elite[85]

FacilitiesEdit

  • Marjorie Barrick Museum Auditorium[86]
  • Marjorie Barrick Museum Exhibition Hall

NotesEdit

  1. ^ AASLH (2002, p.506); Danilov (2005, p.205)
  2. ^ Taylor (2008)
  3. ^ The university was officially founded in 1957 as the Southern Division of the University of Nevada. The university's name was formally changed to UNLV in 1969.
  4. ^ Mikkelsen (2001); Slaughter (2007, p.2)
  5. ^ a b Mikkelsen (2001)
  6. ^ a b Slaughter (2007, p.2)
  7. ^ UNLV Foundation (n.d.)
  8. ^ "Cultural Collections". Collections. Marjorie Barrick Museum. n.d. Retrieved 2009-04-09.
  9. ^ Moehring (2007, p.92); Mower & Wills (2008)
  10. ^ Mower & Wills (2008)
  11. ^ Moehring (2007, p.89); Mower (2007)
  12. ^ Danilov (2005, p.205); Moehring (2007, pp.99,129); Mower (2007)
  13. ^ Giguet, Aurore; Director, Program (February 10, 2012). "There's something going on at the Barrick".
  14. ^ Peterson, Kristen. "The Revamped Barrick Readies For Its Reopening With An Exhibit Of Las Vegas Art Museum Works". Las Vegas Weekly. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  15. ^ Cling, Carol (September 14, 2012). "Renovated Marjorie Barrick Museum reopens with 'Into the Light' exhibit". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  16. ^ a b c d e "Collections | Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art | University of Nevada, Las Vegas". www.unlv.edu.
  17. ^ Vaughan, Jennifer. "UNLV Marjorie Barrick Museum Celebrates 50 Years". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. News Center. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  18. ^ Vaughan, Jennifer. "Alisha Kerlin Named Executive Director of Barrick Museum". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. News Center.
  19. ^ Casey, Juliet V. "Redefining the Experience at the Barrick". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. News Center. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  20. ^ "A look back at our 50th year". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 18 November 2020.
  21. ^ "About". Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  22. ^ "Community Partnerships". University of Las Vegas, Nevada. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  23. ^ Spear, Rosalie. "INTERIM DIRECTOR ALISHA KERLIN LEADS THE BARRICK MUSEUM THROUGH ITS 50TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION". Las Vegas Weekly. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  24. ^ "The Barrick Partners with the Las Vegas Womxn of Color Arts Festival". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  25. ^ "About". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 17 November 2020.
  26. ^ "Lance L. Smith: In the Interest of Action". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  27. ^ "FUTURE RELICS: Artifacts for a New World". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  28. ^ "Yerman: Peaks & Valleys". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  29. ^ "Excerpts: Works from the Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art Collections". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  30. ^ "Nevada Touring Initiative-Traveling Exhibition: Still Here Now". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  31. ^ "Ashley Hairston Doughty: Kept to Myself". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  32. ^ "The Other Side of Paradise". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  33. ^ "Mikayla Whitmore: Between a Rock and a Cliff". issuu. Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  34. ^ "Stars on the Ground: Works by John Torreano". issuu. Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  35. ^ "Connective Tissue: A solo exhibition by Amanda Phingbodhipakkiya". issuu. Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  36. ^ Civin, Marcus. "Zet Gold: On My Mountain". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  37. ^ "Dry Wit: Artworks from the Collection of the Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art". Nevada Humanities. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  38. ^ "Justin Favela and Ramiro Gomez: Sorry for the Mess". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  39. ^ "Human Contact, curated by Samantha Castle". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  40. ^ "Tiger and The Eternal Struggle". Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  41. ^ "Axis Mundo: Queer Networks in Chicano L.A." Marjorie Barrick Museum of Art, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  42. ^ "Jubilation Inflation". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  43. ^ "Soundscapes". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  44. ^ "Art in Context". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  45. ^ "Summer at the Barrick: Andrew Schoultz's new installation "In Process: Every Movement Counts" opens June 2nd". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  46. ^ "Exhibition: Identity Tapestry". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  47. ^ "Announcing Spring 2018 Exhibitions". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  48. ^ "Announcing Spring 2018 Exhibitions". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  49. ^ "Peripheral Flood Control Structures of Las Vegas". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  50. ^ "Announcing Fall 2017 Exhibitions". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  51. ^ "Announcing Fall 2017 Exhibitions". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  52. ^ "Tested Ground". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  53. ^ "Casey Roberts". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  54. ^ "Astronomy of the Asphalt Ecliptic". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  55. ^ "Play On Gary, Play On". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 1 December 2020.
  56. ^ "Josh Azzarella Screenings". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  57. ^ "Exhibition: Abandon All Hope, Ye Who Enter Here". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  58. ^ "Exhibition: Process". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  59. ^ "Exhibition: Masking". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  60. ^ "Fall Exhibition: Edward Burtynsky: Oil (September 23- January 14, 2017)". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  61. ^ "In Transition: Female Figurines from the Michael C. and Mannetta Braunstein Collection". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  62. ^ "Showing the Need for Connection". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  63. ^ "Exhibition: Five (May 20 - September 10, 2016)". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  64. ^ "Exhibition: Ellsworth Kelly (February 12 - May 14, 2016)". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  65. ^ "Exhibition: Unseen Selections (February 12 - May 14, 2016)". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  66. ^ "Teaching Gallery Staff Picks". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  67. ^ "Exhibition: Kveck, Russ & Stellmon: Break Ups & Tear Downs (October 23 - January 23)". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  68. ^ "Style Moderne: Art Glass from the Ruth and Mel Wolzinger Collection". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  69. ^ "Recent Acquisitions". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  70. ^ "The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  71. ^ "Event: Citizen Speak (May 2)". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  72. ^ "Deborah Aschheim: Kennedy Obsession". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  73. ^ "John Millei: If 6 Turned Out To Be 9, Selected Work". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  74. ^ "Exhibition: Reflecting and Projecting". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  75. ^ "Yesterday & Today". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  76. ^ "Panorama". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  77. ^ "Panorama+ Sesquicentennial Celebration of Nevada: Further Selections from the Nevada Arts Council's Artist Fellowship Program". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  78. ^ "Jerry Lewis: Painted Pictures". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  79. ^ "Installation: Derivative Presence". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  80. ^ "Private/Public: Images of Devotion from 19th and Early 20th Century Mexico Opening". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  81. ^ "Art for Art's Sake: Selections from the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  82. ^ "Passage to the Future: Art from a New Generation in Japan". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  83. ^ "The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  84. ^ "The Kent Bicentennial Portfolio: Spirit of Independence". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  85. ^ "Pre-Columbian Sacrifice: The Burden of the Elite". University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Retrieved 2 December 2020.
  86. ^ "Delicate Questions". The Rebel Yell. 2009-03-19. Archived from the original on 30 March 2009. Retrieved 29 March 2009.

ReferencesEdit

  • AASLH [American Association for State and Local History] (2002). Directory of Historical Organizations in the United States and Canada. American Association for State and Local History book series (15th ed.). Lanham, MD: AltaMira Press. ISBN 0-7591-0002-0. ISSN 1045-456X. OCLC 48910178.
  • Bryan-Wilson, Julia (2003). "Building a marker of nuclear warning". In Robert S. Nelson; Margaret Olin (eds.). Monuments and Memory, Made and Unmade. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press. pp. 183–204. ISBN 0-226-57157-2. OCLC 0226571572.
  • Coots, Stephanie (20 September 2004). "A major treasure at UNLV: MBM". The Rebel Yell. Las Vegas: Confederated Students of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. OCLC 41870048. Archived from the original (online edition) on 17 July 2011. Retrieved 2009-04-09.
  • Danilov, Victor J. (2005). Women and Museums: A Comprehensive Guide. Lanham, MD: AltaMira Press. ISBN 978-0-7591-0854-7. OCLC 57613505.
  • Mikkelsen, Ginger (7 July 2001). "Barrick Museum combines arts with sciences" (online edition). View News - Northwest. Las Vegas, NV: View Neighborhood Newspapers. Retrieved 2009-04-09.
  • Moehring, Eugene P. (2007). The University of Nevada, Las Vegas: A History. Reno, NV: University of Nevada Press. ISBN 978-0-87417-709-1. OCLC 81150304.
  • Mower, Lawrence (1 May 2007). "Marjorie Barrick dies at age 89". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Las Vegas, NV: Stephens Media. ISSN 1097-1645. Retrieved 2009-04-09.
  • Mower, Lawrence; Annette Wills (28 May 2008). "Educator Donald Baepler dies". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Las Vegas, NV: Stephens Media. ISSN 1097-1645. Retrieved 2009-04-09.
  • Slaughter, Suzan (Summer 2007). "Nevada Archaeological Association Lifetime Achievement Award 2007" (PDF). In-Situ: Newsletter of the Nevada Archaeological Association. Las Vegas: Nevada Archaeological Association. 11 (2): 2–4. OCLC 70247649. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2008-07-08.
  • Taylor, F. Andrew (29 April 2008). "National Museum Month: A date with discovery" (online edition). View News - Southeast. Las Vegas, NV: View Neighborhood Newspapers. Retrieved 2009-04-09.
  • UNLV Foundation (n.d.). "Donors Put UNLV on the Map for Pre-Columbian Art Studies". Alumni: Case studies. University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Archived from the original on 2009-05-15. Retrieved 2009-04-09.

External linksEdit

  • Marjorie Barrick Museum official site