Senate composition at 1 July 1938

Government (20) - (2 seat majority)
     United Australia Party (16)
     Country Party (3)
     Independent Country (1) [i]

Opposition (16)
     Labor (16) [ii]
 
Changes in composition

  1. ^ Senator William Gibson had been expelled by the Country Party in September 1935. He was listed as an "Independent Country" member and continued to support the government.
  2. ^ At the September 1940 election Labor Senator Jim Sheehan was defeated for a casual vacancy by UAP candidate John Spicer.

This is a list of members of the Australian Senate from 1938 to 1941.[1] Half of its members were elected at the 15 September 1934 election and had terms starting on 1 July 1935 and finishing on 30 June 1941; the other half were elected at the 23 October 1937 election and had terms starting on 1 July 1938 and finishing on 30 June 1944. The process for filling casual vacancies was complex. While senators were elected for a six year term, people appointed to a casual vacancy only held office until the earlier of the next election for the House of Representatives or the Senate.[2]

Senator Party State End term Years in Office
Mac Abbott   Country New South Wales 1941 1935–1941
Stan Amour   Labor / Non-Comm. Labor [a] New South Wales 1944 1938–1965
John Armstrong   Labor / Non-Comm. Labor [a] New South Wales 1944 1938–1962
Tom Arthur   Labor New South Wales 1944 1938–1944
Bill Ashley   Labor New South Wales 1941 1938–1962
Bill Aylett   Labor Tasmania 1944 1938–1965
John Barnes [b]   Labor Victoria 1944 1913–20, 1923–35
Charles Brand   UAP Victoria 1941 1935–1947
Gordon Brown   Labor Queensland 1944 1932–1965
Don Cameron   Labor Victoria 1944 1938–1962
Robert Clothier   Labor Western Australia 1944 1938–1950
Hon. Herbert Collett   UAP Western Australia 1941 1933–1947
Joe Collings   Labor Queensland 1944 1932–1950
Walter Cooper   Country Queensland 1941 1928–1932, 1935–1968
Ben Courtice   Labor Queensland 1944 1937–1962
Thomas Crawford [c]   UAP Queensland 1941 1917–1947
James Cunningham   Labor Western Australia 1944 1937–1943
Richard Darcey   Labor Tasmania 1944 1938–1944
Dick Dein   UAP New South Wales 1941 1935–1941
Hon. Harry Foll [c]   UAP Queensland 1941 1917–1947
James Fraser   Labor Western Australia 1944 1938–1959
Hon. William Gibson   Independent / Country [d] Victoria 1941 1935–1947
Charles Grant   UAP Tasmania 1941 1925, 1932–1941
Hon. John Hayes   UAP Tasmania 1941 1923–1947
Herbert Hays   UAP Tasmania 1941 1923–1947
Bertie Johnston   Country Western Australia 1941 1929–1942
Richard Keane   Labor Victoria 1944 1938–1946
Charles Lamp   Labor Tasmania 1944 1938–1950
Hon. John Leckie   UAP Victoria 1941 1935–1947
Hon. Allan MacDonald   UAP Western Australia 1941 1935–1947
Hon. Philip McBride   UAP South Australia 1944 1937–1944
Hon. Alexander McLachlan   UAP South Australia 1944 1926–1944
James McLachlan   UAP South Australia 1941 1935–1947
Hon. George McLeay   UAP South Australia 1941 1935–1947, 1950–1955
Jim Sheehan [b]   Labor Victoria 1940 [e] 1938–1940, 1944–1962
John Spicer [b]   UAP Victoria 1944 1940–1944, 1950–1956
Oliver Uppill   UAP South Australia 1941 1935–1944
Keith Wilson   UAP South Australia 1944 1938–1944

See also

Notes

  1. ^ a b In April 1940, Amour and Armstrong joined five MHRs in forming the Non-Communist Labor Party, a Lang Labor breakaway led by Jack Beasley. They rejoined the ALP in March 1941.
  2. ^ a b c Labor Senator John Barnes was elected at the October 1937 election to a term starting on 1 July 1938, but died on 31 January 1938; Labor member Jim Sheehan was appointed to replace him on 12 July, with his term expiring at the September 1940 election, when he was defeated by UAP candidate John Spicer to fill the remainder of the vacancy, expiring on 30 June 1944.
  3. ^ a b Father of the Senate
  4. ^ Gibson was expelled from the Country Party on 23 September 1935 for disloyalty.[3] He continued to support the government as an independent, but was not re-admitted to the party until 21 November 1939.[4]
  5. ^ Appointed to a casual vacancy and only held office until the earlier of the next election for the House of Representatives or the Senate.[2]

References

  1. ^ "The Biographical Dictionary of the Australian Senate 1938". Parliament of Australia. Retrieved 19 March 2017.
  2. ^ a b Evans, H. "Filling Casual Vacancies before 1977" (PDF). The Biographical Dictionary of the Australian Senate, Volume 3. Parliament of Australia. Retrieved 24 February 2017.
  3. ^ "Senator Gibson expelled by the Country Party". The Advocate. 24 September 1935.
  4. ^ "Senator Gibson rejoins Country Party". The Canberra Times. 22 November 1939.