Ministry of New and Renewable Energy

Summary

The Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) is a ministry of the Government of India, headed by current Union Cabinet Minister Raj Kumar Singh, that is mainly responsible for research and development, intellectual property protection, and international cooperation, promotion, and coordination in renewable energy sources such as wind power, small hydro, biogas, and solar power.

Ministry of New and Renewable Energy
MNRE India.svg
The Minister of State (IC) for Power and New and Renewable Energy, Shri Raj Kumar Singh addressing a Curtain Raiser Press Conference regarding 2nd Global RE-invest, in New Delhi on September 25, 2018 (cropped).JPG
Raj Kumar Singh
Agency overview
Formed1992; 30 years ago (1992)
Preceding
  • Department of Non-conventional Energy Sources (DNES)
JurisdictionIndiaRepublic of India
HeadquartersNew Delhi, India
Annual budget5,146.63 crore (US$680 million) (2018-19 est.)[1]
Minister responsible
Deputy Minister responsible
Agency executive
  • Indu Shekhar Chaturvedi, IAS, Secretary
Websitehttps://mnre.gov.in/

The broad aim of the ministry is to develop and deploy new and renewable energy for supplementing the energy requirements of India. The current secretary of the ministry is Anand Kumar.[2]

The ministry is headquartered in Lodhi Road, New Delhi.[3] According to the Ministry's 2016-17 annual report, India has made significant advances in several renewable energy sectors which include, solar energy, wind power, and hydroelectricity.[4]

HistoryEdit

The 1970s energy crisis led to the establishment of the Commission for Additional Sources of Energy (CASE) in the Department of Science & Technology (India) in March 1981. The CASE was responsible for the formulation of policies and their implementation, creation of programmes for development of new and renewable energy and coordinating and intensifying R&D in the sector.

In 1982, a new department was created in the then Ministry of Energy, i.e., Department of Non-conventional Energy Sources (DNES). DNES incorporated CASE under its umbrella.

The ministry was established as the Ministry of Non-Conventional Energy Sources in 1992. It adopted its current name in October 2006.[5]

MissionEdit

The Mission of the Ministry is to ensure

  1. Energy Security: Lesser dependence on oil imports through development and deployment of alternative fuels (hydrogen, bio-fuels and synthetic fuels) and their applications to contribute towards bridging the gap between domestic oil supply and demand;
  2. Increase in the share of clean power: Renewable (bio, wind, hydro, solar, geothermal & tidal) electricity to supplement fossil fuel based electricity generation;
  3. Energy Availability and Access: Supplement energy needs of cooking, heating, motive power and captive generation in rural, urban, industrial and commercial sectors;
  4. Energy Affordability: Cost-competitive, convenient, safe, and reliable new and renewable energy supply options; and
  5. Energy Equity: Per-capita energy consumption at par with the global average level by 2050, through a sustainable and diverse fuel- mix.[6]

VisionEdit

To develop new and renewable energy technologies, processes, materials, components, sub-systems, products & services at par with international specifications, standards and performance parameters in order to make the country a net foreign exchange earner in the sector and deploy such indigenously developed and/or manufactured products and services in furtherance of the national goal of energy security.[7]

Key functional areasEdit

The major functional area or Allocation of Business of MNRE are:

  • Commission for Additional Sources of Energy (CASE);
  • Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency (IREDA);
  • Integrated Rural Energy Programme (IREP);
  • Research and development of Biogas and programmes relating to Biogas units;
  • Solar Energy including Solar Photovoltaic devices and their development, production, and applications;
  • Programme relating to improved chulhas and research and development thereof;
  • All matters relating to small/mini/micro hydel projects and below 25 MW capacities;
  • Research and development of other non-conventional/renewable sources of energy and programmes relating thereto;
  • Tidal energy;
  • Geothermal Energy;
  • Biofuel: (i) National Policy; (ii) research, development and demonstration on transport, stationary and other applications; (iii) setting up of a National Bio-fuels Development Board and strengthening the existing institutional mechanism; and (iv) overall coordination.

InitiativesEdit

  • Jawaharlal Nehru National Solar Mission (JNNSM) - The National Solar Mission was launched on 11 January 2010 by the Prime Minister. The Mission has set the ambitious target of deploying 20,000 MW of grid-connected solar power by 2022. Further, Government has revised the target of Grid Connected Solar Power Projects from 20,000 MW by the year 2021-22 to 100,000 MW by the year 2021-22 under the National Solar Mission and it was approved by Cabinet on 17 June 2015.[8]
  • National Biogas and Manure Management Programme (NBMMP)[9]
  • Solar Lantern Programme LALA[10]
  • Solar thermal energy Demonstration Programme[11]
  • Remote Village Lighting Programme[12]
  • National Biomass Cookstoves Initiative (NBCI)[13]
  • National Offshore Wind Energy Authority[14]
  • Association of Renewable energy agencies of states (AREAS): It was formed by Ministry for better coordination and sharing of best practices among various state nodal agencies for renewable energy. The Minister in charge of the MNRE (Ministry of New and Renewable energy) is the patron while the Secretary of MNRE is the ex-officio president of the association.[15]
  • One Sun One World One Grid initiative : The ambitious project aims to connect 140 countries of South East Asia and Middle East to a trans-national solar power grid. The idea was first proposed by India in 2018 assembly of International Solar Alliance and is aimed at moving one step ahead in the direction of target of government to produce 40% of its energy requirements from the renewable sources. The idea behind this initiative is, "Sun never sets" and it is constant at a particular geographic location at a given point of time. The Ministry of New and Renewable Energy will head this initiative with technical support from the World Bank.[16]

New InitiativesEdit

  • Green Energy Corridor
  • Renewable Purchase Obligations
  • Net Metering Policy
  • Repowering of Wind power projects
  • International Solar Alliance
  • Surya Mitra Scheme

AchievementsEdit

Power from renewablesEdit

Grid-basedEdit

As per Annual Report 2016-17 of Ministry, As of December 2016, the Ministry was successful in deploying a total of 50068.37 Megawatt (MW) capacity of grid-based renewable energy. 28700.44 MW of which was from Wind power, 4333.85 MW from Small hydro Power, 7907.34 MW from Bio power 9012.66 MW from Solar power (SPV), and the rest 114.08 MW from Waste to Power.

Off-gridEdit

During the same time period, the total deployment of an Off-grid based renewable energy capacity was about 1403.70 MW. Of these, Biomass (non-bagasse) Cogeneration consisted of 651.91 MW, Bio mass Gasifier was 186.88 MW Waste to energy was 163.35 MW, SPV Systems (of less than 1 Kilowatt (kW)) capacity was 405.54 1 MW, and the rest from micro-Hydro and Wind power.

Other renewable energy systemsEdit

The total number of deployment of Family Biogas plant was 49.40 lakhs. And the total area that is covered with Solar water heating (SWH) systems was 4.47 Million m2.

InstitutionsEdit

The Ministry has 5 specialized technical institution.[17] They are:-

  • National Institute of Solar Energy (NISE): National Institute of Solar Energy, an autonomous institution of Ministry of New and Renewable (MNRE), is the apex National R&D institution in the field Solar Energy. The Government of India has converted 25-year-old Solar Energy Centre (SEC) under MNRE to an autonomous institution in September 2013 to assist the Ministry in implementing the National Solar Mission and to coordinate research, technology, skill development, training, consultancy, incubation and other related works. NISE is located in Gurugram, Haryana
  • National Institute of Wind Energy (NIWE): NIWE has been established in Chennai in the year 1998, as an autonomous R&D institution by the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE), Government of India. It is a knowledge-based institution of high quality and dedication, offers services and seeks to find complete solutions for the kinds of difficulties and improvements in the entire spectrum of the wind energy sector by carrying out further research. NIWE is located in Chennai, Tamil Nadu. Website : https://niwe.res.in/
  • Sardar Swaran Singh National Institute of Bio-Energy (SSS-NIBE): SSS-NIBE is an autonomous Institution of the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy. Govt. of India spread over a sprawling campus of about 75 acres, the Institute is marching towards development into a Global Centre of Excellence in the Bio-Energy. The objectives of the Institute are to carry out and facilitate research, design, development, testing, standardization & technology demonstration eventually leading to commercialization of RD&D output with a focus on bioenergy, biofuels & synthetic fuels in solid, liquid & gaseous forms for transportation, portable & stationary applications, development of hybrid / integrated energy systems, to undertake & facilitate human resource development at all levels including postdoctoral research. It is located in Kapurthala (Punjab).
  • Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency (IREDA): IREDA is a Non-Banking Financial Institution under the administrative control of this Ministry for providing term loans for renewable energy and energy efficiency projects.IREDA is a Public Limited Government Company.
  • Solar Energy Corporation of India (SECI): SECI is a CPSU under the administrative control of the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE), set up on 20th Sept 2011 to facilitate the implementation of JNNSM and achievement of targets set therein. It is the only CPSU dedicated to the solar energy sector. It was originally incorporated as a section-25 (not for profit) company under the Companies Act, 1956

State Nodal AgenciesEdit

The Ministry has established state nodal agencies in different states and union territories of India to promote and expand the growth of efficient energy use of renewable energy in their respective states. The primary objective of a state nodal agency under this ministry is to develop, coordinate, finance and promote research projects in the new and renewable energy field. It is also expected to devise programmes for research and development as well as applicative extensions of new and renewable energy sources.[18]

State Nodal Agencies under Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, India
State Nodal Agency Managing Director/Chief Executive Officer Notes
Andhra Pradesh Non-Conventional Energy Development Corporation of Andhra Pradesh (NEDCAP) Ltd. M. Kamalakar Babu [19]
Arunachal Pradesh Arunachal Pradesh Energy Development Agency (APEDA) Marki Loya
Assam Assam Energy Development Agency Haresh Chandra Dutta [20]
Bihar Bihar Renewable Energy Development Agency Dayanidhan Pandey [21]
Chhattisgarh Chhattisgarh State Renewable Energy Development Agency (CREDA) S. K. Shukla [22]
Goa Goa Energy Development Agency Michael M. D’souza [23]
Gujarat Gujarat Energy Development Agency (GEDA) V A Vaghela [24]
Haryana Haryana Renewal Energy Development Agency (HAREDA) Amneet P. Kumar [25]
Himachal Pradesh HIMURJA Bhanu Pratap Singh [26]
Jammu & Kashmir Jammu & Kashmir Energy Development Agency (JAKEDA) Sh. Gulzar Hussain [27]
Jharkhand Jharkhand Renewable Energy Development Agency K. K. Verma [28]
Karnataka Karnataka Renewable Energy Development Agency Ltd. G.V. Balaram [29]
Kerala Agency for Non-conventional Energy and Rural Technology (ANERT) M Jayaraju [30]
Madhya Pradesh MP Urja Vikas Nigam Ltd. SR Mohanty [31]
Maharashtra Maharashtra Energy Development Agency (MEDA) Pravin Darade [32]
Manipur Manipur Renewable Energy Development Agency (MANIREDA) Birmani Singh Chingtham
Meghalaya Meghalaya Non-conventional & Rural Energy Development Agency Jopthiaw Lyngdoh [33]
Mizoram Zoram Energy Development Agency (ZEDA) Arun Kumar Tripathi [34]
Nagaland Nagaland Renewable Energy Development Agency K.T. Wabang [35]
Odisha Odisha Renewable Energy Development Agency (OREDA) Roopa Mishra [36]
Punjab Punjab Energy Development Agency Amarpal Singh [37]
Rajasthan Rajasthan Renewable Energy Corporation Limited B.K. Dosi [38]
Sikkim Sikkim Renewable Energy Development Agency Ms. Siphora G. Targain [39]
Tamil Nadu Tamil Nadu Energy Development Agency(TEDA) Thiru. Sudeep Jain [40]
Tripura Tripura Renewable Energy Development Agency K.K.Ghosh [41]
Uttar Pradesh Non-conventional Energy Development Agency (NEDA) Kumar Ravikant Singh [42]
Uttarakhand Uttarakhand Renewable Energy Development Agency (UREDA) [43]
Puducherry UT Renewable Energy Agency Puducherry (REAP)
West Bengal West Bengal Renewable Energy Development Agency (WBREDA) Narayan Swaroop Nigam [44]

List of MinistersEdit

# Portrait Name Tenure Prime Minister Political Party
1 Kalpnath Rai
(Independent Charge)
21 June 1991 2 July 1992 1 year, 11 days P. V. Narasimha Rao Indian National Congress
2   P. V. Narasimha Rao 2 July 1992 16 May 1996 3 years, 319 days
3   Atal Bihari Vajpayee 16 May 1996 1 June 1996 16 days Atal Bihari Vajpayee Bharatiya Janata Party
4   H. D. Deve Gowda 1 June 1996 21 February 1997 265 days Deve Gowda Janata Dal
5   Jai Narain Prasad Nishad
(Independent Charge)
21 February 1997 10 January 1998 323 days Deve GowdaI. K. Gujral
6   I. K. Gujral 10 January 1998 19 March 1998 68 days I. K. Gujral
(3)   Atal Bihari Vajpayee 19 March 1998 3 February 1999 321 days Atal Bihari Vajpayee Bharatiya Janata Party
7 P R Kumaramangalam 3 February 1999 13 October 1999 252 days
8 M. Kannappan
(Independent Charge)
13 October 1999 30 December 2003 4 years, 78 days Dravida Munnetra Kazhagam
(3)   Atal Bihari Vajpayee 30 December 2003 9 January 2004 10 days Bharatiya Janata Party
9 Kariya Munda 9 January 2004 22 May 2004 134 days
10   Vilas Muttemwar
(Independent Charge)
22 May 2004 22 May 2009 5 years, 0 days Manmohan Singh Indian National Congress
11   Farooq Abdullah 28 May 2009 26 May 2014 5 years, 4 days Jammu & Kashmir National Conference
12   Piyush Goyal
(Independent Charge)
26 May 2014 3 September 2017 3 years, 100 days Narendra Modi Bharatiya Janata Party
13   R. K. Singh
(Independent Charge
till 7-Jul-2021)
3 September 2017 Incumbent 4 years, 298 days

List of Ministers of StateEdit

Ministers of State in the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy
Minister of state Portrait Political party Term Years
Bhagwanth Khuba BJP 7 July 2021 Incumbent 356 days

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Budget data" (PDF). www.indiabudget.gov.in. 2019. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 March 2018. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  2. ^ "Anand Kumar joins MNRE as Secretary". Energynext. Retrieved 23 June 2019.
  3. ^ Contact Details Archived 20 August 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ "Annual Report". Mnre.gov.in. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  5. ^ 1. http://mnre.gov.in/mission-and-vision-2/people/minister/
  6. ^ "Ministry of New and Renewable Energy - Mission". mnre.gov.in. Retrieved 2 October 2017.
  7. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 29 January 2018. Retrieved 29 January 2018.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  8. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 31 January 2018. Retrieved 29 January 2018.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  9. ^ Family Type Biogas Plants Programme Archived 19 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  10. ^ Solar Lantern Programme Archived 19 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  11. ^ Solar Thermal Energy Demonstration Archived 19 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  12. ^ Remote Village Lighting Programme Archived 19 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  13. ^ National Biomass Cookstoves Initiative Archived 19 May 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  14. ^ "National Offshore Wind Energy Authority (NOWA) to be constituted shortly" (Press release). India: Press Information Bureau. 14 August 2013. Retrieved 14 August 2013.
  15. ^ "AREAS". Ministry of New and Renewable EnergyGOI. Retrieved 1 September 2020.
  16. ^ "One Sun, One World, One Grid: All you need to know about mega solar plan". Business Standard. Retrieved 2 September 2020.
  17. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 23 January 2018. Retrieved 29 January 2018.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  18. ^ Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Status in India (PDF) (Report). ICLEI South Asia. May 2007. p. 29. Archived from the original (PDF) on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  19. ^ "Non-Conventional Energy Development Corporation of Andhra Pradesh". Archived from the original on 7 September 2014. Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  20. ^ "Assam Energy Development Agency". Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  21. ^ "Bihar Renewable Energy Development Agency". Archived from the original on 7 September 2014. Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  22. ^ "Chhattisgarh State Renewable Energy Development Agency". Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  23. ^ "Goa Energy Development Agency". Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  24. ^ "Gujarat Energy Development Agency" (PDF). Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  25. ^ "Haryana Renewal Energy Development Agency". Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  26. ^ "HIMURJA". Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  27. ^ "Jammu & Kashmir Energy Development Agency". Archived from the original on 7 September 2014. Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  28. ^ "Jharkhand Renewable Energy Development Agency". Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  29. ^ "Karnataka Renewable Energy Development Agency Ltd". Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  30. ^ "EnergyNext - Kerala draft policy awaits cabinet nod". Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  31. ^ "MP Urja Vikas". Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  32. ^ "Maharashtra Energy Development Agency". Archived from the original on 7 September 2014. Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  33. ^ "Meghalaya Non-conventional & Rural Energy Development Agency". Archived from the original on 30 May 2014. Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  34. ^ "Aizawal Solar City Master Plan" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 8 February 2013. Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  35. ^ "Nagaland Renewable Energy Development Agency". Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  36. ^ "OREDA Orissa". Retrieved 3 February 2017.
  37. ^ "Punjab Energy Development Agency Staff Structure" (PDF). Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  38. ^ "Rajasthan Renewable Energy Corporation Limited - Directors" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 7 September 2014. Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  39. ^ "Sikkim Now - SREDA Director offers solar city scheme". Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  40. ^ "Tamil Nadu Energy Development Agency". Archived from the original on 19 August 2014. Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  41. ^ "Tripura Renewable Energy Development Agency". Archived from the original on 7 September 2014. Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  42. ^ "Non-conventional Energy Development Agency". Archived from the original on 7 September 2014. Retrieved 7 September 2014.
  43. ^ "Uttarakhand Renewable Energy Development Agency". UREDA. Retrieved 3 February 2017.
  44. ^ "West Bengal Renewable Energy Development Agency". Retrieved 7 September 2014.

External linksEdit

  • Official website MNRE
  • Official website Ministry of Power
  • Solar Energy Corporation of India
  • National Institute of Solar Energy
  • National Institute of Wind Energy, India
  • Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency