Naval Auxiliary Landing Field San Clemente Island

Summary

Naval Auxiliary Landing Field San Clemente Island
Frederick Sherman Field
Part of Naval Base Coronado
San Clemente Island, California in the United States
Blowing Smoke (16751193180).jpg
A Marine engages targets from a UH-1Y Venom with VMM-161 during Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX) above San Clemente Island
NALF San Clemente is located in the United States
NALF San Clemente
NALF San Clemente
Location in the United States
Coordinates33°01′22″N 118°35′19″W / 33.02278°N 118.58861°W / 33.02278; -118.58861Coordinates: 33°01′22″N 118°35′19″W / 33.02278°N 118.58861°W / 33.02278; -118.58861
TypeNaval Auxiliary Landing Field
Site information
OwnerDepartment of Defense
OperatorUS Navy
Controlled byNavy Region Southwest
ConditionOperational
WebsiteOfficial website
Site history
Built1937 (1937)
In use1937 – present
Garrison information
Current
commander
Captain John DePree
Airfield information
IdentifiersICAO: KNUC, FAA LID: NUC, WMO: 722925
Elevation56 metres (184 ft) AMSL
Runways
Direction Length and surface
06/24 2,834.9 metres (9,301 ft) Concrete
Helipads
Number Length and surface
H1 21.3 metres (70 ft) Concrete
H2 21.3 metres (70 ft) Concrete
Source: Federal Aviation Administration[1]

Naval Auxiliary Landing Field (NALF) San Clemente Island (ICAO: KNUC, FAA LID: NUC), also known as Frederick Sherman Field, is a military airport located on San Clemente Island, in Los Angeles County, California, United States. It has been owned by the United States Navy since 1937.

San Clemente Island is the southernmost Channel Island, covering 57 square miles (150 km2). The island is approximately 21 nmi (39 km) long and is 4.5 nmi (8 km) across at its widest point. It lies 55 nmi (102 km) south of Long Beach and 68 nmi (130 km) west of San Diego.

Operations

One of the primary military functions of San Clemente has been to support research and development of many of the Navy's weapon systems. In 1939, the Navy developed the first Landing Craft, Vehicle and Personnel (LCVP) "Higgins Boat" at SCI. This was the beginning of the Naval Amphibious Force, which was one of the key factors in the outcome of World War II.

Today SCI's primary function is twofold: to support tactical training of the Pacific Fleet, and to continue as a key research and development facility. SCI provides the Navy and Marine Corps a multi-threat warfare training range. A major part of Navy training takes place on the ranges right off the SCI shores. The primary range covers over 149,000 square miles (386,000 km2) and is the Navy's busiest fleet airspace. Also included in this training area are two mine exercise areas, the Southern California Anti-Submarine Warfare Range, seven submarine areas, the shallow water Undersea Training Range, and two laser training ranges. In total, SCI is a unique combination of airfields, airspace and ranges unlike any other facility owned by the Navy. It is the only location in the Pacific where surface ships, submarines, aircraft and Navy expeditionary forces can train in all warfare areas simultaneously using shore gunnery, bombardment, air defense, antisubmarine and electronic warfare.

The station was designated as the Frederick C. Sherman Field on 11 January 1961, in honor of Vice Admiral Frederick C. Sherman, a three-time recipient of the Navy Cross.

Environment

To reduce the use of diesel fuel and prevent harmful emissions, the Naval facility on San Clemente Island installed three 225 kilowatt wind turbines.[citation needed] From February 1998 to April 2000, the turbines produced two GWh, approximately 13 percent of the island's total electricity needs. In FY99, the turbines helped the installation decrease consumption of 141,757 US gallons (537 m³) of No. 2 diesel fuel, and avoided 18,450 pounds (8,369 kg) of carbon monoxide emissions. In the future, the turbines should provide 15 percent or more of the island's electricity, further reducing diesel fuel use and emissions.

References

  • FAA Airport Form 5010 for NUC PDF
  1. ^ FAA Airport Form 5010 for NUC PDF

External links

  • FAA Airport Diagram (PDF), effective October 7, 2021
  • Resources for this U.S. military airport:
    • FAA airport information for NUC
    • AirNav airport information for KNUC
    • ASN accident history for NUC
    • NOAA/NWS latest weather observations
    • SkyVector aeronautical chart for KNUC
  • https://web.archive.org/web/20071225175104/http://www.nbc.navy.mil/index.asp?fuseaction=NBCInstallations.NALFSCI