New Zealand quail

Summary

New Zealand quail
Coturnix novaezelandiae.jpg

Extinct  (1875) (IUCN 3.1)[1]
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Aves
Order: Galliformes
Family: Phasianidae
Genus: Coturnix
Species:
C. novaezelandiae
Binomial name
Coturnix novaezelandiae
Quoy & Gaimard, 1830
Synonyms

Coturnix novaezelandiae
novaezelandiae
Quoy & Gaimard, 1830

The New Zealand quail (Coturnix novaezelandiae), or koreke in Māori, is an extinct quail species endemic to New Zealand. The male and female were similar, except the female was lighter. The first scientist to describe it was Sir Joseph Banks when he visited New Zealand on James Cook's first voyage. Terrestrial and temperate, this species inhabited lowland tussock grassland and open fernlands.[2] The first specimen to be obtained by a European was collected in 1827 by Jean René Constant Quoy and Joseph Paul Gaimard on Dumont D'Urville's voyage.

History

Research was conducted between 2007 and 2009 into whether the quails on Tiritiri Matangi Island – which was spared the worst impact of introduced predators – might be a surviving population of this species, or koreke-brown quail (Synoicus ypsilophora) hybrids.[3] However, a genetic study showed instead that the quail on Tiritiri Matangi are Australian brown quail, Synoicus ypsilophora.[4] Sequences were derived for all quail species within the Australian and New Zealand Coturnix sp. complex.[5]

Taxonomy

It has sometimes been considered conspecific with the Australian stubble quail Coturnix pectoralis, which would then be named Coturnix novaezelandiae pectoralis as the New Zealand bird was described first. However, the genetic analysis showed that they are separate though closely related species.[6]

Gallery

References

  1. ^ BirdLife International (2016). "Coturnix novaezelandiae". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2016: e.T22678955A92795779. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-3.RLTS.T22678955A92795779.en. Retrieved 12 November 2021.
  2. ^ Pappas, J. (2002). "Coturnix novaezelandiae". Animal Diversity Web.
  3. ^ NZ quail may not be extinct say scientists after Haurauki Gulf island discovery, Massey News, 24 March 2007.
  4. ^ Scientists nail quail mystery — Tiri quails found to be Aussie imports, Massey News, 23 October 2009.
  5. ^ Seabrook-Davison, M.; Huynen, L.; Lambert, D.M.; and Brunton D.H. (2009). Ancient DNA Resolves Identity and Phylogeny of New Zealand's Extinct and Living Quail (Coturnix sp.). PLoS ONE 4(7), e6400. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0006400 A neighbour-joining phylogenetic distance tree was constructed in PAUP4 with 1000 bootstrap replications to determine the strength of groupings. The sequences used for the tree were derived from 3 separate mitochondrial control region sequences..
  6. ^ Seabrook-Davison, M.; Huynen, L.; Lambert, D.M.; and Brunton D.H. (2009). Ancient DNA Resolves Identity and Phylogeny of New Zealand's Extinct and Living Quail (Coturnix sp.). PLoS ONE 4(7), e6400. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0006400.

External links

  • Koreke, the New Zealand Quail (with pictures, article, taxonomy, & description).
  • 3D view of specimens RMNH 110.051 and RMNH 110.052 at Naturalis, Leiden (requires QuickTime browser plugin).
  • New Zealand Quail / Koreke. Coturnix novaezelandiae. by Paul Martinson. Artwork produced for the book Extinct Birds of New Zealand, by Alan Tennyson, Te Papa Press, Wellington, 2006
  • The Quail (male and female) Coturnix Novae Zealandie by Johannes Keulemans in the collection of the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa
  • New Zealand Quail by George Lodge, 1913 in the collection of the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa