Nuclear power by country

Summary

The Cattenom Nuclear Power Plant in France. France produces around three quarters of its electricity by nuclear power.[1]

Nuclear power plants currently operate in 32 countries.[2] Most are in Europe, North America, East Asia and South Asia. The United States is the largest producer of nuclear power, while France has the largest share of electricity generated by nuclear power, at about 70%.[3]

China has the fastest growing nuclear power program with 13 new reactors under construction,[4] and a considerable number of new reactors are also being built in India, Russia and South Korea.

Some countries operated nuclear reactors in the past but have currently no operating nuclear plants. Among them, Italy closed all of its nuclear stations by 1990 and nuclear power has since been discontinued because of the 1987 referendums. Kazakhstan and Armenia are planning to reintroduce nuclear power in the future. Belarus has its first nuclear power plant under construction and plans to have it operating by the end of 2020.[5]

Several countries are currently operating nuclear power plants but are planning a nuclear power phase-out. These are Belgium, Germany, Spain, and Switzerland. Other countries, like Sweden, and Taiwan are also considering a phase-out. Austria (Zwentendorf Nuclear Power Plant) and the Philippines (Bataan Nuclear Power Plant) never started to use their first nuclear plants that were completely built.

Due to financial, political and technical reasons, Cuba, Libya and Poland never completed the construction of their first nuclear plants, and Australia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Ghana, Ireland, Kuwait, Oman, Peru and Singapore never built their planned first nuclear plants.[6][7] Some of these countries are still planning to introduce nuclear power. As of 2020, Poland is in advanced planning phase for 1.5 GW and plans to have up to 9 GW by 2040.[8] In 2021, Iraq declared it plans to build 8 nuclear reactors by 2030 to supply up to 25% electric power in the grid that currently suffers from shortages.[9]

Overview

Nations based on nuclear output as a percentage of national power output.
Timeline of commissioned and decommissioned nuclear capacity since the 1950s.[10] Positive numbers show the commissioned capacity for each year; negative numbers show the decommissioned capacity for each year.
Global status of nuclear deployment as of June 2020 (source: see file description)
  Operating reactors, building new reactors
  Operating reactors, planning new build
  No reactors, building new reactors
  No reactors, planning new build
  Operating reactors, stable
  Operating reactors, considering phase-out
  Civil nuclear power is illegal
  No reactors

Of the 32 countries in which nuclear power plants operate, only France, Slovakia, and Ukraine use them as the source for a majority of the country's electricity supply as of 2020. Other countries have significant amounts of nuclear power generation capacity.[2] By far the largest nuclear electricity producers are the United States with 789,919 GWh of nuclear electricity in 2020, followed by China with 344,748 GWh.[2] As of December 2020, 448 reactors with a net capacity of 397,777 MWe are operational, and 51 reactors with net capacity of 53,905 MWe are under construction. Of the reactors under construction, 13 reactors with 12,565 MWe are in China and 6 reactors with a capacity of 4,194 MWe are in India.[11]

Nuclear power by country[2]
Country Reactors Capacity
Net-total (MWe)
Generated
electricity (GWh)
Share of total
electricity use
Notes
Operational U/C
Argentina Argentina 3 1 1,641 10,012 7.5%
Armenia Armenia 1 0 415 2,552 34.5%
Bangladesh Bangladesh 0 2 N/A N/A N/A
Belarus Belarus 1 1 1,110 338 1.0%
Belgium Belgium 7 0 5,942 32,793 39.1% Phase-out planned
Brazil Brazil 2 1 1,884 13,244 2.1%
Bulgaria Bulgaria 2 0 2,006 15,938 40.8%
Canada Canada 19 0 13,624 92,166 14.6%
China China 52 14 49,590 344,748 4.9%
Czech Republic Czech Republic 6 0 3,934 28,372 37.3%
Finland Finland 4 1 2,794 22,354 33.9%
France France 56 1 61,370 338,671 70.6%
Germany Germany 6 0 8,113 60,918 11.3% 2022 Phase-out
Hungary Hungary 4 0 1,902 15,179 48.0%
India India 23 6 6,880 43,029 3.1%
Iran Iran 1 1 915 5,792 1.7%
Japan Japan 33 2 31,679 43,099 5.1% Many reactors currently stopped
South Korea South Korea 24 4 23,150 152,583 29.6%
Mexico Mexico 2 0 1,552 10,864 4.9%
Netherlands Netherlands 1 0 482 3,886 3.2%
Pakistan Pakistan 5 1 1,318 9,639 7.1%
Romania Romania 2 0 1,300 10,575 19.9%
Russia Russia 38 3 28,580 201,821 20.6%
Slovakia Slovakia 4 2 1,837 14,357 53.1%
Slovenia Slovenia 1 0 688 6,041 37.8%
South Africa South Africa 2 0 1,860 11,616 5.9%
Spain Spain 7 0 7,121 55,825 22.2%
Sweden Sweden 6 0 7,763 47,362 29.8%
Switzerland Switzerland 4 0 2,960 23,049 32.9% Gradual Phase-out planned
Taiwan Taiwan 4 0 3,844 30,342 12.7%
Turkey Turkey 0 3 N/A N/A N/A
Ukraine Ukraine 15 2 13,107 71,550 51.2%
United Arab Emirates United Arab Emirates 2 2 2,690 1,560 1.1%
United Kingdom United Kingdom 13 2 8,923 45,668 14.5%
United States United States 93 2 95,520 789,919 19.7%
World total 449 51 397,777 2,553,200

See also

References

  1. ^ "World Nuclear Power Reactors & Uranium Requirements". World Nuclear Association. 1 October 2010. Retrieved 23 October 2010.
  2. ^ a b c d "Nuclear Share of Electricity Generation in 2020". IAEA. 24 June 2021. Retrieved 25 June 2021.
  3. ^ "Nuclear Power in France | French Nuclear Energy - World Nuclear Association". www.world-nuclear.org. Retrieved 8 January 2021.
  4. ^ "China Nuclear Power | Chinese Nuclear Energy - World Nuclear Association". www.world-nuclear.org.
  5. ^ World Nuclear Association. Nuclear Power in Belarus World Nuclear Association, May 2020.
  6. ^ Duroyan Fertl (5 June 2011). "Germany: Nuclear power to be phased out by 2022". Green Left.
  7. ^ James Kanter (25 May 2011). "Switzerland Decides on Nuclear Phase-Out". New York Times.
  8. ^ Wilczek, Maria (16 June 2020). "Construction of Poland's first nuclear power plant to begin in 2026". Notes From Poland. Retrieved 18 June 2020.
  9. ^ "Iraq hopes to build 8 nuclear power reactors by 2030". Brecorder. 15 June 2021. Retrieved 18 June 2021.
  10. ^ "Operational & Long-Term Shutdown Reactors". IAEA. 13 April 2013. Retrieved 14 April 2013.
  11. ^ Nuclear Power Reactors in the World (PDF). Vienna: International Atomic Energy Agency. 2020. ISBN 978-92-0-114820-9.

External links

  • World Nuclear Statistics
  • 2006 statistics in Neutron Physics by Paul Reuss