Ptichka

Summary

Ptichka
Burya
Птичка
Буря
05 OK-1.02.png
TypeBuran-class orbiter
Construction number1.02
CountrySoviet Union
Status95-97% complete[1]

Ptichka (Russian: Птичка, "little bird"; GRAU index serial number 11F35 2K, Article 1.02 or OK-1.02) GRAU was a nickname for the second Buran-class orbiter, produced as part of the Soviet/Russian Buran programme. Although OK-1.02 was closest to being completed of any of the Buran-class orbiters (after the orbiter Buran), it was never finished. The program was officially cancelled in 1993, at which point the shuttle was 95-97% complete. The proposed official name for OK-1.02 was Burya (Russian: Буря, "storm" or "tempest").[1] [2]

Projected flights

Ptichka was preparing for its maiden flight to perform the first fully regular Buran-class orbiter operation. (The flight of Buran 11F35 1K Article 1.01 was lacking regular thermal control and power systems.) This orbiter was also planned to receive a remote manipulator and docking system.

As of 1989 the orbital flight test program for the second orbiter was split into two missions, with a space station approach test on the second, but delays in preparations changed the plans to perform all test tasks in one maiden flight, scheduled for December 1991.[3] The mission profile included:

  • unmanned launch
  • automatic docking with Mir's Kristall module.
  • crew transfer from Mir to the spaceplane, with onboard systems testing in course of twenty-four hours.
  • remote manipulator testing
  • undocking and autonomous flight in orbit
  • Manned Soyuz TM No.101 docking to the orbiter.
  • crew transfer from the Soyuz to the spaceplane and on board work in the course of twenty-four hours
  • automatic undocking and landing

After program cancellation

OK-1.02 in storage at Baikonur Cosmodrome in 2020.

In August 1995, 1.02 was moved into storage within the MZK building (Russian: МЗК, Монтажно-Заправочный Комплекс, Assembling and Fueling Facility) at Baikonur Cosmodrome, alongside the full size test article OK-MT.[4] The media have speculated that Ptichka is the property of Kazakhstan-Russia Joint Venture Company Aelita, a subsidiary of RKK Energia.[1]

2021 graffiti incident

In April 2021, OK-1.02 was vandalized with graffiti, including the word dobro (Russian: добро, meaning "good") on the right side of the orbiter.[5] Photos of the graffiti surfaced on Instagram and Telegram on May 26 of that year, though by that time the orbiter had already been painted over.[6][7] According to NASASpaceFlight.com, there is evidence that Roscosmos may have known about the vandalism and decided to cover it up.[7]

The vandalism caused distress to many space enthusiasts. Roscosmos also expressed concern and expressed its belief that the Buran hardware at Baikonur Cosmodrome should be transferred to a museum, and that it would discuss the issue at the next Intergovernmental Kazakh-Russian Commission.[8] Dauren Musa, the current owner of the orbiter, also expressed his concern about the state of the hardware, and stated that he would discuss the fate of his orbiters with Roscosmos.[7]

NASASpaceFlight noted that the vandalism may have benefited the orbiters by drawing attention to their condition.[7]

See also

Coordinates: 45°56′25.6″N 63°19′6.3″E / 45.940444°N 63.318417°E / 45.940444; 63.318417

References

  1. ^ a b c "Несостоявшаяся гордость отечественной космонавтики - второй летный корабль 11Ф35 первой серии (изделие 1.02)" (in Russian).
  2. ^ Cite error: The named reference Buran vehicles registry was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  3. ^ "Экипажи "Бурана" Несбывшиеся планы". buran.ru. Retrieved 5 August 2006.
  4. ^ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KOYEg1fj95Q
  5. ^ Newdick, Thomas. "Graffiti Artists Defaced Soviet-Era Buran Space Shuttle At Russian Space Center". The Drive. Retrieved 28 May 2021.
  6. ^ Speed, Richard. "Who gave dusty Soviet-era spacecraft that unwanted lick of paint? It was an idiot, with a spraycan, in Baikonur". www.theregister.com. Retrieved 28 May 2021.
  7. ^ a b c d Pavlushchenko, Katya (27 May 2021). "Buran shuttle graffiti highlights concern for space history, need for museum ownership & care". NASASpaceFlight.com. Retrieved 28 May 2021.
  8. ^ "Someone Reportedly Vandalized a Historic Soviet Spaceship with Graffiti". www.vice.com. Retrieved 28 May 2021.

External links

  • 1.02 orbiter
  • Photoset of MZK building, current state of stored orbiter
  • Buran vehicles registry