Queen Anne's Gate

Summary

Queen Anne’s Gate is a street in Westminster, London. Many of the buildings are Grade I listed, known for their Queen Anne architecture.

Queen Anne’s Gate

LocationEdit

Queen Anne’s Gate runs from Old Queen Street in the east to a cul-de-sac in the west. It runs parallel with Birdcage Walk to the north and Petty France, Broadway and Tothill Street to the south. Carteret Street joins Queen Anne’s Gate on its southern side.

HistoryEdit

Queen Anne's Gate is formed from two older streets, Park Street, part of the Christ's Hospital estate, and Queen Square, developed by the South Sea Company. In 1874, Park Street and Queen Square were renumbered and renamed Queen Anne's Gate.[1]

There was a chapel at 50 Queen Anne's Gate, built in 1706 as a private chapel to serve the residents of Queen Square. By 1870, it had become a charitable school, and later served as a mission hall and a police institute. By 1890, it had become offices.[2] The site is now occupied by the modern Ministry of Justice building.

Occupants and buildingsEdit

 
15 Queen Anne’s Gate

The street is home to:

  • No. 14, home for many years to T. P. O’Sullivan & Partners.
  • No. 16, a Grade I listed house that was the former home of John Fisher, 1st Baron Fisher, and of William Smith where there are commemorative blue plaques in both names. The restoration of the house won a Georgian Group award. It is now owned by Troels Holch Povlsen.[3]
  • No. 21, a Grade I listed building dating to 1704 that at one time housed spymaster Sir George Mansfield Smith-Cumming. In 1909, Smith-Cumming founded the Secret Intelligence Service, which became MI6, and its initial operations were based at #21. A secret tunnel led from #21 to MI6's headquarters on a nearby street.[4]
  • No. 24, home to the politician Sir George Shuckburgh-Evelyn from 1783 to 1788, and the judge Sir Edward Vaughan Williams, from 1836 until his death in 1875.[5]
  • No. 26 was home to Sting and Trudy Styler for approximately 20 years until 2016 when they sold the home and, separately, their art collection: https://www.christies.com/features/Sting-and-Trudie-Styler-The-Composition-of-a-Collection-7018-3.aspx?sc_lang=en&lid=1
  • No. 32, in the early 1920s this house was the home of the writer Elizabeth Bowen who resided there with her great aunt Edith (Lady Allendale).[6]
  • No. 34, formerly the home of Edward Tennant, 1st Baron Glenconner, and from 1962 to 2013, home to St Stephen's Club, a private member's club.[7]
  • No. 36, head office of the National Trust, until about 2004.[8]

Nos. 5-13, 14–22, 15, 17/19, 21/23, 25, 26–32, 34, 40, 42, 44 and 46 are listed examples of Queen Anne architecture.[citation needed] There is also a statue of Queen Anne on the street.

 
Statue of Queen Anne at Queen Anne's Gate London

FictionalEdit

  • No. 15, home to Lord Brett Sinclair (Roger Moore) in The Persuaders!. This house can be seen in some episodes, with Sinclair's Aston Martin in front of it.

Old Queen StreetEdit

Old Queen Street is a continuation of Queen Anne’s Gate, connecting it to Storey’s Gate. It was first laid out with townhouses in the late 18th century, and is home to many institutions, including the National Crime Agency and the European Council on Foreign Relations.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Old & New London, vol.IV, p.44
  2. ^ Cox, Montagu H. "Queen Square Chapel Pages 137-141 Survey of London: Volume 10, St. Margaret, Westminster, Part I: Queen Anne's Gate Area". British History Online. Retrieved 2 October 2021.
  3. ^ "Large 18th century London town houses: 16 Queen Anne's Gate". Visitinghousesandgardens. Retrieved 12 January 2015.
  4. ^ Martin, Guy. "The Spy Who Lived Here: Own the Real-Life M's London Mansion--For $22 Million". Forbes.
  5. ^ "No. 24 Queen Anne's Gate". BHO. Retrieved 13 January 2015.
  6. ^ "Elizabeth Bowen, Portrait of a writer" by Victoria Glendinning P44.
  7. ^ "St Stephen's Club to close". PoliticsHome. Archived from the original on 16 February 2013. Retrieved 13 January 2015.
  8. ^ Lusher, Adam (26 August 2001). "National Trust staff threaten exodus". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 13 January 2015.

Coordinates: 51°30′1.91″N 0°7′58.12″W / 51.5005306°N 0.1328111°W / 51.5005306; -0.1328111