Rhodes 19

Summary

The Rhodes 19 is an American trailerable day sailer or sailing dinghy, that was designed by Philip Rhodes as a one-design racer and first built in 1958.[1][2][3][4]

Rhodes 19
Rhodes 19 sail badge.png
Development
DesignerPhilip Rhodes
LocationUnited States
Year1958
No. built3,200
Builder(s)O'Day Corp
Stuart Marine
RoleOne-design racer
NameRhodes 19
Boat
Boat weight1,325 lb (601 kg)
Draft3.25 ft (0.99 m)
Hull
Typemonohull
Constructionfiberglass
LOA19.16 ft (5.84 m)
LWL17.75 ft (5.41 m)
Beam7.00 ft (2.13 m)
Hull appendages
Keel/board typefin keel
Ballast428 lb (194 kg)
Rudder(s)transom-mounted rudder
Rig
Rig typeBermuda rig
I foretriangle height15.00 ft (4.57 m)
J foretriangle base6.50 ft (1.98 m)
P mainsail luff24.00 ft (7.32 m)
E mainsail foot9.88 ft (3.01 m)
Sails
Sailplanfractional rigged sloop
Mainsail area118.56 sq ft (11.015 m2)
Jib/genoa area48.75 sq ft (4.529 m2)
Total sail area167.31 sq ft (15.544 m2)
Racing
PHRF99.0

The Rhodes 19 shares the same hull design as the 1962 Mariner 19.[4][5]

ProductionEdit

The design was built by O'Day Corp and later by Stuart Marine in the United States. It remains in production, with 3,200 boats completed.[1][4][6][7]

DesignEdit

The Rhodes 19 traces its linage to the 1945 Hurricane 19 sailboat design. The Hurricane 19 was constructed of moulded plywood, had an open cockpit and was initially built by the Allied Aviation Corporation. Another boat builder, Palmer Scott, purchased some incomplete Hurricane hulls and modified them with a foredeck, a cuddy cabin and a fixed keel, marketing the resultant boat as the Smyrna. Marscot Plastics used one of the wooden Smyrnas as a plug to build a mold from and created a fiberglass version, which became the Rhodes 19.[1]

The Rhodes 19 is a recreational sailboat, built predominantly of fiberglass, with wood trim. It has a fractional sloop rig with aluminum spars, including an optional tapered mast. The hull has a raked stem, a plumb transom, a transom-hung rudder controlled by a tiller and a fixed fin keel or centerboard.[1][4]

The design has sleeping accommodation for two people in the cuddy cabin and includes a built-in icebox.[4]

For sailing the design has cockpit space for six to eight people. It is equipped with a stern-mounted mainsheet traveler, adjustable jib leads and foam flotation for safety.[4]

Factory options included a boom tent, boom vang, Cunningham, cockpit bailers, whisker pole and a spinnaker of 326 sq ft (30.3 m2).[4]

VariantsEdit

Rhodes 19
This keelboat model displaces 1,325 lb (601 kg) and carries 428 lb (194 kg) of iron ballast. The boat has a draft of 3.25 ft (0.99 m) with the standard keel fitted. The boat has a Portsmouth Yardstick DP-N racing average handicap of 99.0. The fixed keel Rhodes 19 is the only variant used for class racing.[1]
Rhodes 19 CB
This centerboard sailing dinghy model displaces 1,030 lb (467 kg) and carries no ballast. The rudder is a "kick-up" design. The boat has a draft of 4.92 ft (1.50 m) with the centerboard down and 10 in (25 cm) with it retracted. The boat has a Portsmouth DP-N racing average handicap of 97.4.[2]

Operational historyEdit

The boat has an active class club, the Rhodes 19 Class Association, that organizes racing.[8]

In a 1994 review Richard Sherwood wrote, "a Sail magazine “breakthrough boat” with tremendous influence upon sailing, the Rhodes 19 is the first popular day sailer. Centerboard and keel versions are available, with the former found mostly on lakes and the latter in coastal waters ... The 19 is actively raced."[4]

See alsoEdit

Related development

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e McArthur, Bruce (2020). "Rhodes 19 sailboat". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 10 November 2020. Retrieved 10 November 2020.
  2. ^ a b McArthur, Bruce (2020). "Rhodes 19 CB sailboat". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 10 November 2020. Retrieved 10 November 2020.
  3. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2020). "Philip Rhodes". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 10 November 2020. Retrieved 10 November 2020.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h Sherwood, Richard M.: A Field Guide to Sailboats of North America, Second Edition, pages 104-105. Houghton Mifflin Company, 1994. ISBN 0-395-65239-1
  5. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2018). "Mariner 19 FK sailboat specifications and details". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 2 May 2019. Retrieved 10 November 2020.
  6. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2020). "O'Day Corp". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 11 November 2020. Retrieved 10 November 2020.
  7. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2020). "Stuart Marine". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 11 November 2020. Retrieved 10 November 2020.
  8. ^ McArthur, Bruce (2020). "Rhodes 19 Class Association". sailboatdata.com. Archived from the original on 11 November 2020. Retrieved 10 November 2020.

External linksEdit

  • Official website