SES-12

Summary

SES-12
SES-12 Mission (27695627527).jpg
SES-12 launches aboard a Falcon 9 rocket.
Mission typeCommunications
OperatorSES S.A.
COSPAR ID2018-049A
SATCAT no.43488
Websitehttps://www.ses.com/
Mission duration15 years (planned)
2 years, 10 months, 18 days (elapsed)
Spacecraft properties
Spacecraft typeEurostar
BusEurostar-300EOR
ManufacturerAirbus Defence and Space
Launch mass5,384 kg (11,870 lb)
Start of mission
Launch date4 June 2018, 04:45:00 UTC
RocketFalcon 9 Full Thrust, (s/n B1040.2}
Launch siteCape Canaveral, SLC-40
ContractorSpaceX
Entered serviceAugust 2018
Orbital parameters
Reference systemGeocentric orbit
RegimeGeostationary orbit
Longitude95° East
Transponders
Band54 Ku-band
Coverage areaSouth Asia, Asia-Pacific
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SES-12 is a geostationary communications satellite operated by SES S.A.

Satellite description

SES-12 was designed and manufactured by Airbus Defence and Space. It has a mass of 5,384 kg (11,870 lb) and has a design life of at least 15 years.[1]

Launch

SES-12 was successfully launched on a SpaceX Block 4 (booster B1040.2) Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral SLC-40 on 4 June 2018 at 04:45:00 UTC, and was successfully released into orbit approximately 33 minutes later.[2]

Market

The SES-12 satellite expands SES's capabilities to provide direct-to-home (DTH) broadcasting, Very-small-aperture terminal (VSAT), mobility, and High-Throughput Satellite (HTS) data connectivity services in the Asia-Pacific region, including rapidly growing markets such as India and Indonesia. The satellite replaces NSS-6 at this location and is co-located with SES-8. SES-12 is capable of supporting requirements in multiple verticals from Cyprus in the West to Japan in the East, and from Russia in the North to Australia in the South.[3]

Together with SES-8, it reaches 18 million homes.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ "SES-12". Gunter's Space Page. 4 June 2018. Retrieved 13 April 2021.
  2. ^ Dean, James (4 June 2018). "SpaceX Falcon 9 delivers massive commercial satellite to orbit from Cape Canaveral". Florida Today. Retrieved 13 April 2021.
  3. ^ "Display: SES-12 2018-049A". NASA. 5 April 2021. Retrieved 13 April 2021. This article incorporates text from this source, which is in the public domain.
  4. ^ "Space X Falcon Delivers SES-12 into orbit". RapidTVNews. 4 June 2018. Retrieved 13 April 2021.