Samuel Eliot Morison Award for Naval Literature

Summary

The Samuel Eliot Morison Award for Naval Literature is for literature about the United States Navy. The award was created in 1982 by the New York Commandery of the Naval Order of the United States, who administers and chooses the winner which is a significant book on naval history from the prior year.[1]

The prize is named for Rear Admiral Samuel Eliot Morison, a military historian.[2]

AwardeesEdit

Sources:[2][3]

Samuel Eliot Morison Award for Naval Literature

  • 1983 Samuel Eliot Morison, honorary on launch of new award [1][clarification needed]
  • 1984 Victor H. Krulak, First to Fight: An Inside View of the U.S. Marine Corps
  • 1987 Ivan Musicant, Battleship at War: The Epic Story of the USS Washington[4]
  • 1988 Michael A. Palmer, Stoddert's War: Naval Operations during the Quasi-war with France, 1798-1801[5]
  • 1989 John F. Lehman, Command of the Seas: Building the 600 Ship Navy
  • 1992 Clark G. Reynolds, Admiral John H. Towers: The Struggle for Naval Air Supremacy[6]
  • 1993 Eugene B. Fluckey, Thunder Below!: The USS Barb Revolutionizes Submarine Warfare in World War II [7][8]
  • 1995 John B. Lundstrom, The First Team and the Guadalcanal Campaign: Naval Fighter Combat from August to November 1942[9]
  • 1997 Joseph H. Alexander, Storm Landings: Epic Amphibious Battles in the Central Pacific[10][11][unreliable source?]
  • 1998 Ivan Musicant, Empire by Default: The Spanish–American War and the Dawn of the American Century[4]
  • 1999 Edward L. Beach, Jr., Salt and Steel: Reflections of a Submariner
  • 2000 Edwin H. Simmons, Dog Company Six
  • 2001 Donald Chisolm, Waiting for Dead Men's Shoes: Origins and Development of the U.S. Navy's Officer Personnel System, 1793-1941
  • 2002 Norman Friedman, Seapower As Strategy: Navies and National Interests
  • 2003 John F. Lehman, On Seas of Glory: Heroic Men, Great Ships, and Epic Battles of the American Navy
  • 2004 James D. Hornfischer, The Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors
  • 2005 Michael Walling, Bloodstained Sea: The U.S. Coast Guard in the Battle of the Atlantic, 1941-1944
  • 2006 Joseph F. Callo, John Paul Jones: America's First Sea Warrior
  • 2007 Ian W. Toll, Six Frigates: Epic History of Founding of the US Navy
  • 2008 George C. Daughan, If by Sea: Forging of the US Navy
  • 2009 James L. Nelson, George Washington's Secret Navy: How the American Revolution Went to Sea
  • 2010 James Scott, The Attack on the Liberty: The Untold Story of Israel's Deadly 1967 Assault on a U.S. Spy Ship
  • 2011 Robert Gandt, The Twilight Warriors: The Deadliest Naval Battle of WWII
  • 2012 Elliot Carlson, Joe Rochefort's War: The Odyssey of the Codebreaker Who Outwitted Yamamoto at Midway
  • 2013 Walter R. Borneman, The Admirals: Nimitz, Halsey, Leahy, and King — The Five-Star Admirals Who Won the War at Sea
  • 2014 Jack Cheevers, Act of War: Lyndon Johnson, North Korea, and the Capture of the Spy Ship Pueblo
  • 2015 Craig L. Symonds, Neptune: The Allied Invasion of Europe and the D-Day Landings[12]
  • 2016 Tim McGrath, Give Me a Fast Ship: The Continental Navy and America's Revolution at Sea[13]
  • 2017 Richard Snow, Iron Dawn: The Monitor, the Merrimack, and the Civil War Sea Battle that Changed History[14]
  • 2018 John F. Wukovits, Tin Can Titans: The Heroic Men and Ships of World War II's Most Decorated Navy Destroyer Squadron[15]
  • 2019 Hampton Sides, On Desperate Ground: The Marines at The Reservoir, the Korean War's Greatest Battle[16]
  • 2020 M. Ernest Marshall, Rear Admiral Herbert V. Wiley: A Career in Airships and Battleships[17]
  • 2021 Award is scheduled to be awarded on Monday, 8 November 2022[18]

Samuel Eliot Morison Award for Distinguished Contribution to Naval Literature

  • Thomas B. Buell, The Quiet Warrior: A Biography of Admiral Raymond A. Spruance [19][dubious ]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b William A. Pencak (15 October 2009). Encyclopedia of the Veteran in America. ABC-CLIO. p. 303. ISBN 9780313087592. Retrieved December 23, 2017. The New York Commandery created the Samuel Eliot Morison Award in 1982, giving it each year to an author who published a significant book on naval history.. The first award went to its namesake posthumously..
  2. ^ a b "Latest NOUS Awards". Naval Order of the United States. Archived from the original on 2017-06-03. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  3. ^ "Previous Morison Book Awards". Naval Order of the United States, New York Commandery. Archived from the original on 2016-08-27. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  4. ^ a b "Gift Creates Library Fund and Book Collection". BSU Horizons. Bemidji State University. 14 (4): 6. Summer 1999. Retrieved December 23, 2017. Musicant was a two time recipient of the presteigious Samuel Eliot Morison Award for Naval Literature.. the first was award to him in 1987 for Battleship at War.. The second was presented in 1998 for his book Empire by Default
  5. ^ "Michael A. Palmer". Contemporary Authors Online. Gale. July 16, 2009. Retrieved December 23, 2017. Samuel Eliot Morison Award for naval literature, and Book of the Year Award, American Revolutionary War Round Table of New York, both for Stoddert's War: Naval Operations during the Quasi-war with France, 1798-1801
  6. ^ Donald A. Yerxa (March 2006). "In Memoriam: Clark G. Reynolds". Historically Speaking. 7 (4). Retrieved December 23, 2017. His biography, Admiral John H. Towers: The Struggle for Naval Air Supremacy (Naval Institute Press, 1991), won the Samuel Eliot Morison Prize and the K. Jack Bauer Award.
  7. ^ Matt Schudel (July 2, 2007). "Rear Adm. Eugene B. Fluckey; Commanded Submarine Attacks on Japanese Shipping". Washington Post. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  8. ^ Eugene B. Fluckey. "Message to Today's Submariners". Submarine Force Museum. Retrieved December 23, 2017. Thunder Below!, which won the prestigious Samuel Eliot Morison prize for Best Naval Literature in 1993
  9. ^ "John Bernard Lundstrom". Contemporary Authors Online. Gale. 2008. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  10. ^ https://primoa.library.unsw.edu.au/primo-explore/fulldisplay/UNSW_ALMA51222794550001731/UNSWS
  11. ^ Rocklin Lyons (September 8, 2010). "Col. Joseph H. Alexander USMC (ret)". Flickr. Retrieved December 23, 2017. winner of 1997 Samuel Eliot Morison Award from the Naval Order of the United States
  12. ^ "Neptune by Craig L. Symonds - 2015 Samuel Eliot Morison Award For Naval Literature". Naval Order of the United States. September 14, 2015. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  13. ^ "Give Me a Fast Ship by Tim McGrath - 2016 RADM Samuel Eliot Morison Award for Naval Literature". Naval Order of the United States. November 14, 2016. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  14. ^ "Iron Dawn by Richard Snow - 2017 RADM Samuel Eliot Morison Award for Naval Literature". Naval Order of the United States. November 15, 2017. Retrieved December 23, 2017.
  15. ^ "John Wukovits, author of Tin Can Titans - 2018 RADM Samuel Eliot Morison Award for Naval Literature". Naval Order.
  16. ^ "Hampton Sides, author of On Desperate Ground - 2019 RADM Samuel Eliot Morison Award for Naval Literature". Naval Order. November 4, 2019. Retrieved December 17, 2020.
  17. ^ "M. Ernest Marshall, author of Rear Admiral Herbert V. Wiley: A Career in Airships and Battleships - 2020 RADM Samuel Eliot Morison Award for Naval Literature". Naval Order. December 3, 2020. Retrieved December 17, 2020.
  18. ^ "Naval Order of the United States New York Commandery".
  19. ^ Donald Chisholm (Autumn 2003). "Thomas B. Buell: sailor and scholar". Naval War College Review. General OneFile. 56 (4). Retrieved December 23, 2017. The Naval Institute Press reissued it in 1987 for its Classics of Naval Literature series; the Naval Order of the United States bestowed on Buell its Rear Admiral Samuel Eliot Morison Award for Distinguished Contribution to Naval Literature