Shades of chartreuse

Summary

Shades of chartreuse are listed below. Historically, many of these colors have gone under the name of either yellow or green, as the specifics of their color composition was not known until later.

Chartreuse
 
Shades of chartreuse.png
About these coordinates     Color coordinates
Hex triplet#80FF00
sRGBB (r, g, b)(128, 255, 0)
HSV (h, s, v)(90°, 100%, 100%)
CIELChuv (L, C, h)(90, 123, 119°)
SourceOn the RGB color wheel, Chartreuse is defined as the colour halfway between yellow and green. The colour halfway between yellow and green on the RGB color wheel has a hex code of 80FF00.
ISCC–NBS descriptorVivid yellowish green
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Wrapping the spectrum into a color wheelEdit

 
 
Visible spectrum wrapped to join green and yellow in an additive mixture of chartreuse

In a color proximity sense, a primary color has a color range of 120° (60° on each side of the color's hue) and any color has to be within that range to be considered a variation of that color. Secondary colors have a color range of 60° (30°), tertiary colors have a color range of 30° (15°), quaternary colors have a color range of 15° (7.5°), quinary colors have a color range of 7.5° (3.75°), and so on. Because chartreuse is located at a hue angle of 90°, it has a tertiary color range of 75° and 105°, and any color out of this range is more related to yellow or green than chartreuse. If the visible spectrum is wrapped to form a color wheel, chartreuse (additive tertiary) appears midway between yellow and green:

Chartreuse as a tertiary color on the RGB color wheel
  green
  chartreuse
  yellow
  orange

Definitions of chartreuseEdit

Chartreuse (web color)Edit

Chartreuse (web color)
 
 
      Color coordinates
Hex triplet#7FFF00
sRGBB (r, g, b)(127, 255, 0)
HSV (h, s, v)(90°, 100%, 100%)
CIELChuv (L, C, h)(90, 123, 120°)
SourceX11
ISCC–NBS descriptorVivid yellowish green
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Chartreuse green was codified to refer to this brighter color when the X11 colors were formulated in 1987; by the early 1990s, they became known as the X11 web colors. The web color chartreuse is the color precisely halfway between green and yellow, so it is 50% green and 50% yellow. It is one of the tertiary colors of the HSV color wheel, also known as the RGB color wheel. Another name for this color is chartreuse green.[1]

The term chartreuse is defined by the Oxford English Dictionary as: "A shade of colour; a pale apple-green". The dictionary gives a quotation in the British publication Western Daily Press (26 Dec. 1884) Vol. 7 No. 5 as being the earliest occurrence found in print of the term 'chartreuse' used as the name of a color. However the source does not define or describe the color referred to.[2]

"Chartreuse Green" is also listed in Plochere Color System (1948).[3]

In Color: Universal Language and Dictionary of Names (1976), "Chartreuse Green" is listed under "116. Brilliant Yellow Green".[4]

In The Domestic Monthly (1885) is written, "The delicate, pale green, with a yellow tinge, entitled 'Chartreuse,' is a rival to the renewed apple green," and, "The new shade of Chartreuse green, from light to dark, is lovely in the large feather fans. ... Some of the corded silks have fancy stripes in a combination of colors such as ... mousse and Chartreuse, which is the stylish yellow green."[5]

In The Ladies' Home Journal of May 1889, is written, "Chantilly cloaks come shaped like the old-fashioned rotonde, with collar of narrow lace, and are worn over a lining of chartreuse green or jonquil yellow."[6]

In The Millinery Trade Review (1889) is written, "From Madame Catlin of Paris, a hat of velvet in moss-green of medium tone, or of strong Chartreuse-green."[7]

In The Mineral Industry (1898) is written, "The characteristic twin colors of a few doubly refractive gems will prove of interest ... tourmaline green (chartreuse green and bluish green).[8]

In Dry Goods Reporter (1905), it is noted under "Choosing an Easter Hat" — "Chartreuse greens are among the colors hardest of all to combine artistically, and yet with the new popular bluet are charming."[9]

In Pure Products (1910) is written, "The following colors can be bought in powder form ... chartreuse green".[10]

In a 1956 edition of Billboard, a jukebox is advertised as being available in "Delft blue, cherry red, embered charcoal, chartreuse green, bright sand, canary yellow, atoll coral and night-sky black."[11]

In 1988, Margaret Walch, director of the Color Association of the United States is reported to have said, "The hottest color out there now is an ugly chartreuse green.... It suggests what we don't have: nature, youth, energy, growth."[12]

Chartreuse (traditional)Edit

Chartreuse (traditional)
 
      Color coordinates
Hex triplet#DFFF00
sRGBB (r, g, b)(223, 255, 0)
HSV (h, s, v)(68°, 100%, 100%)
CIELChuv (L, C, h)(95, 108, 97°)
SourceMaerz and Paul[13]
ISCC–NBS descriptorVivid yellowish green
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)
 
A bottle of chartreuse liqueur

The first recorded use of chartreuse for the color that is now called chartreuse yellow in American English was in 1892.[14]

In the book Color Standards and Color Nomenclature (1912), "Chartreuse Yellow" is listed and illustrated.[15]

Variations of chartreuseEdit

Bright greenEdit

Bright green
 
      Color coordinates
Hex triplet#66FF00
sRGBB (r, g, b)(102, 255, 0)
HSV (h, s, v)(96°, 100%, 100%)
CIELChuv (L, C, h)(89, 127, 123°)
SourceHexcode Color Chart[16]
ISCC–NBS descriptorVivid yellowish green
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Bright green is on the color wheel approximately one-third of the way between chartreuse green and harlequin (color #3FFF00) (closer to chartreuse green than to harlequin). Bright green represents a visual stimulus of 556 nanometers on the visual spectrum as measured on the CIE chromaticity diagram. The X11 color green is somewhat similar to bright green, with a hex triplet of #00FF00, compared to bright green's triplet of #66FF00.

The color bright green is used to represent bright green environmentalism[17] or the Viridian design movement.

Yellow-greenEdit

Yellow-green
 
      Color coordinates
Hex triplet#9ACD32
sRGBB (r, g, b)(154, 205, 50)
HSV (h, s, v)(80°, 76%, 80%)
CIELChuv (L, C, h)(77, 86, 107°)
SourceX11
ISCC–NBS descriptorVivid yellow green
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

  Yellow-green is a dull medium shade of chartreuse.   Before the X11 colors were formulated in 1987, the color term yellow-green was used to refer to the color that is now designated as the web color chartreuse (chartreuse green). Now, the term "yellow-green" is used to refer to this medium desaturated shade of chartreuse.

Green-yellowEdit

Green-yellow
 
 
A Crayola green-yellow crayon
      Color coordinates
Hex triplet#ADFF2F
sRGBB (r, g, b)(173, 255, 47)
HSV (h, s, v)(84°, 82%, 100%)
CIELChuv (L, C, h)(92, 111, 112°)
SourceX11[18]
ISCC–NBS descriptorVivid yellow green
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Green-yellow is a mixture of the colors green and yellow. It is a web color. It is a light tint of chartreuse.

"Green-yellow" is an official Crayola crayon color which was formulated in 1958.

Green-yellow is near the center of the light spectrum visible to the human eye, and is very eye-catching. For this reason, many emergency vehicles and uniforms exhibit green-yellow.

LimeEdit

Lime
 
 
      Color coordinates
Hex triplet#BFFF00
sRGBB (r, g, b)(191, 255, 0)
HSV (h, s, v)(75°, 100%, 100%)
CIELChuv (L, C, h)(93, 111, 107°)
SourceMaerz & Paul[19]
ISCC–NBS descriptorVivid yellow green
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

  Lime is a color that is sometimes referred to as a representation of the color of the citrus fruit called limes. However, in its original form, it referred to the colour of the samara fruits of the lime or linden tree (species in the genus Tilia).   The first recorded use of lime green as a color name in English was in 1890.[20][14]  

Rifle greenEdit

Rifle green
 
      Color coordinates
Hex triplet#444C38
sRGBB (r, g, b)(68, 76, 56)
HSV (h, s, v)(84°, 26%, 30%)
CIELChuv (L, C, h)(31, 14, 105°)
SourcePantone TPX[21][22]
ISCC–NBS descriptorDark grayish olive green
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

The color rifle green is displayed at right.

The source of this color is the Pantone Textile Paper eXtended (TPX) color list, color No. 19-0419 TPX—Rifle green.[23]

The first recorded use of rifle green as a color name in English was in 1858.[24]

Rifle green is so named from the distinctive color of the uniform of rifle regiments (a form of light infantry) of a number of European armies, and is still used as such by rifle regiments in many Commonwealth armies, such as the Rifles and Royal Gurkha Rifles of the British Army and the Queen's Own Rifles of Canada.

 
John Fitzgerald Kennedy, escorted by a Bermuda Militia Artillery officer in Royal Artillery blue No. 1 dress, inspects green-uniformed riflemen of the Bermuda Rifles in 1961

Rifle green was originally adopted by rifle regiments in the 18th century, including the famous 95th Rifles of the Napoleonic Wars. As the traditional role of riflemen was that of marksmen and skirmishers who attacked behind the cover of trees, a dark green uniform was adopted as an early form of camouflage, as opposed to the colorful uniforms worn by other soldiers of the period. The vegetable based dyes used during the 18th and early 19th centuries were not fast, frequently fading after exposure to the elements to lighter shades of green or even brown. While this had advantages in terms of reduced visibility on active service, it did not make for a smart appearance on the peace-time parade ground. Accordingly, the color of the rifleman's uniform was progressively darkened until it approached black. After 1890 the development of chemical dyes permitted the adoption of the stable shade of rifle green now worn. In the U.S. armed forces, the green beret may be worn only by soldiers awarded the Special Forces Tab, signifying they have been qualified as special forces soldiers. The special forces beret is officially designated "beret, man's, wool, rifle green, army shade 297". Previously, rifle green uniforms had been issued to Hiram Berdan's elite 1st and 2nd United States Sharpshooters during the American Civil War.

Rifle green was the official uniform color of the Canadian Forces (CF) after unification; it was thereafter generally referred to as "CF green"; indeed, the service dress uniform of the day was referred to as "CF greens". After the introduction of the distinct environmental uniform (DEU), rifle green remained as the uniform color of the winter land environment DEU; a short-lived tan uniform was worn in summer. After the demise of the tans, the rifle green DEU was worn year-round. Rifle green was also the color of the uniform worn by the Northern Irish Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) until 2001 where the RUC was renamed the PSNI and while the uniform color remained the same, terminology changed to "bottle green".[25]

Rifle green is 19–0419 TPX in the Pantone palette, or hex code #444C38 in the sRGB color space, as shown above.

Spring budEdit

Spring bud
 
      Color coordinates
Hex triplet#A7FC00
sRGBB (r, g, b)(167, 252, 0)
HSV (h, s, v)(80°, 100%, 99%)
CIELChuv (L, C, h)(91, 114, 112°)
SourceMaerz and Paul[26]
ISCC–NBS descriptorVivid yellow green
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

  Spring bud was the color that was traditionally called "spring green" before the web color spring green was formulated in 1987.   The first recorded use of spring green as a color name in English (meaning the color that is now called spring bud) was in 1766.[27]

Lawn greenEdit

Lawn green
 
      Color coordinates
Hex triplet#7CFC00
sRGBB (r, g, b)(124, 252, 0)
HSV (h, s, v)(90°, 100%, 99%)
CIELChuv (L, C, h)(89, 122, 120°)
SourceX11
ISCC–NBS descriptorVivid yellowish green
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

  Lawn green is a bright tint of chartreuse.

Apple greenEdit

Apple green
 
 
      Color coordinates
Hex triplet#8AB800
sRGBB (r, g, b)(138, 184, 0)
HSV (h, s, v)(75°, 100%, 72%)
CIELChuv (L, C, h)(69, 83, 106°)
SourceISCC-NBS
ISCC–NBS descriptorVivid yellow green
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

  Apple green is a representation of the color of the outer skin of a Granny Smith apple. A darker version of this color has been used for the IRT Lexington Avenue Line since June 1979, when the NYCTA decided to assign line colors to all the routes within the major trunk lines in the Central Business District, plus different colors for services not entering Manhattan. By doing this, they scrapped the 1967 colors that were assigned separately to each service.   The first recorded use of apple green as a color name in English was in 1648.[28]

Apple green as a quaternary color on the RYB color wheel
  green
  apple green
  chartreuse

Kelly greenEdit

Kelly green
 
      Color coordinates
Hex triplet#4CBB17
sRGBB (r, g, b)(76, 187, 23)
HSV (h, s, v)(101°, 88%, 73%)
CIELChuv (L, C, h)(67, 94, 123°)
Source[Unsourced]
ISCC–NBS descriptorVivid yellowish green
B: Normalized to [0–255] (byte)

Kelly green is an American term. The name derives from the fact that the surname Kelly, as well as the color green, are both popular in Ireland. The use of the term as a color name occurred at least as far back as March 1911 when it appeared in The Boston Globe and newspapers across the country as the new color of fashion.[29]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ See the 1930s version of "Chartreuse green" in the index and color samples, a color not as green as the web color chartreuse, but greener than chartreuse yellow – actually it is a representation of the actual color of green chartreuse liqueur. The first recorded use of chartreuse green as a color name in English was in 1926 – Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color Page 192; Color sample of Chartreuse Green: Page 47 Plate 12 Color Sample L2
  2. ^ The Oxford English Dictionary (Second ed.). 1989.
  3. ^ Gladys and Gustav Plochere (Dec 15, 1948) Plochere Color System in Book Form, a Guide to Color and Color Harmony, Los Angeles OCLC 5033214
  4. ^ Kenneth Low Kelly, Deane Brewster Judd (1976) Color: Universal Language and Dictionary of Names, p. 58, U.S. Department of Commerce, National Bureau of Standards; Catalog record for Color: Universal Language and Dictionary of Names at the United States Library of Congress
  5. ^ The Domestic Monthly: An Illustrated Magazine of Fashion, Literature, and the Domestic Arts (1885) Vol. 23, pp. 162, 237, 368, Blake and Company, New York
  6. ^ "New Fashions" (May 1889) The Ladies' Home Journal, Vol. 6, No. 6, p. 14, Philadelphia
  7. ^ The Millinery Trade Review (Sep 1889) Vol. 14, No. 9, p. 18
  8. ^ "The Identification of Gems" (1898) The Mineral Industry, Vol. 7, p. 283, McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York and London
  9. ^ "Latest Spring Millinery" (Apr 22, 1905) Dry Goods Reporter Vol. 35, No. 16 p. 33, Chicago
  10. ^ "The Coloration of Liqueurs" (1910) Pure Products, Vol. 6, No. 1, p. 278, Scientific Station for Pure Products, New York
  11. ^ Billboard (Mar 24, 1956) p. 85
  12. ^ "Fashion Confusion" (June 20, 1988) New York Magazine, Vol. 21, No. 25
  13. ^ The color displayed here matches the color called chartreuse in the 1930 book by Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill; the color chartreuse is displayed on page 45 Plate 11, Color Sample L1.
  14. ^ a b Aloys John Maerz; Morris Rea Paul (1930) A Dictionary of Color, p. 192, New York: McGraw-Hill
  15. ^ Robert Ridgway (1912) Color Standards and Color Nomenclature, p. 67, Published by the author, Washington D.C. OCLC 630954
  16. ^ Diner, Web. "restaurant web design, restaurant website design, restaurant graphic design, restaurant marketing". Webdiner.
  17. ^ "Worldchanging – Evaluation + Tools + Best Practices: Bright Green, Light Green, Dark Green, Gray: The New Environmental Spectrum". worldchanging.com. Archived from the original on 2016-01-12.
  18. ^ "SVG Color Keywords, CSS3 Color Module, W3C Candidate Recommendation 14 May 2003". W3C. Retrieved 2007-01-06.
  19. ^ Aloys John Maerz; Morris Rea Paul (1930) A Dictionary of Color, New York: McGraw-Hill; The index refers to Plate 20 Color Sample J1 as Lime Green; this color is shown on Plate 20 as being halfway between yellow-green (the old name for the color that is now called chartreuse green) and yellow on the color wheel.
  20. ^ The Daily News (London) 14 July 1890. "lime, n2". Oxford English Dictionary online version. Oxford University Press. September 2011. Retrieved 2011-11-15. (subscription or participating institution membership required)
  21. ^ Type the words "Rifle green" into the indicated window on the Pantone Color Finder and the color will appear. http://www.pantone.com/pages/pantone/colorfinder.aspx
  22. ^ The color displayed in the color box above matches the color called Rifle green in the 1930 book by Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill; the color Rifle green is displayed on page 87, Plate 32, Color Sample A2.
  23. ^ "Pantone TPX Pantone Color Finder—Type the words "Rifle green" into the indicated window on the Pantone Color Finder and the color will appear". pantone.com.
  24. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 203; Color Sample of Russian Green: Page 87 Plate 32 Color Sample A2
  25. ^ "Patten Report". BBC News.
  26. ^ The color displayed here matches the color called spring green in the 1930 book by Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill; the color spring green is displayed on page 59, Plate 18, Color Sample J7.
  27. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 205; Color Sample of Spring Green: Page 59 Plate 18 Color Sample J7
  28. ^ Maerz and Paul A Dictionary of Color New York:1930 McGraw-Hill Page 189; Color Sample of Apple Green: Page 61 Plate 19 Color Sample J6
  29. ^ Boston Globe 1911, [1] – retrieved from Newspapers.com.

External linksEdit