Singapore Army

Summary

The Singapore Army is the land service branch of the Singapore Armed Forces (SAF). It is the largest of the three services and primarily a conscript army that in the event of national exigencies or war, morphs itself from peacetime to a war footing by mobilising almost all of its combined combat power by calling up operationally-ready military reservists.

Singapore Army
Tentera Singapura  (Malay)
新加坡陆军 (Chinese)
சிங்கப்பூர் தரைப்படை (Tamil)
Crest of the Singapore Armed Forces.png
Crest of the Singapore Armed Forces
Founded12 March 1957; 65 years ago (1957-03-12)
Country Singapore
TypeArmy
RoleLand warfare
Size45,000 active personnel[1]
240,000 reserve personnel[1]
Part ofSingapore Armed Forces
Motto(s)"Ready, Decisive, Respected."
MarchSingapore Infantry Regiment March
Engagements
Commanders
PresidentHalimah Yacob
Minister for DefenceNg Eng Hen
Chief of Defence ForceLieutenant-General Melvyn Ong
Chief of ArmyBrigadier-General David Neo
Chief of Staff – General StaffBrigadier-General Frederick Choo
Sergeant Major of the ArmySenior Warrant Officer Yeo Keng Hua
Insignia
FlagSingapore Army service flag.svg
LogoOur Singapore Army logo.jpg

HistoryEdit

Two infantry regiments formed the nucleus of the Singapore Army. These were established pre-independence, in anticipation of self-rule following British decolonisation. The First Singapore Infantry Regiment (1 SIR) was formed in 1957, under British auspices. The Second Singapore Infantry Regiment (2 SIR) followed in 1963. After a fraught merger with the Federation of Malaya and subsequent separation in 1965, newly independent Singapore formally established its army by passing the Singapore Army Bill in December 1965.[6] A few months later, the SIR's two active battalions and the Singapore Artillery were joined by a reserve component, the People's Defence Force, formed mostly of volunteers, by then a new incarnation of the old Singapore Volunteer Force that was mobilized for service during the Indonesia–Malaysia confrontation. A third battalion, 10th Battalion PDF, was raised as the volunteer reserve of the Army infantry.

In 1967, the Army began to expand when the National Service programme was officially launched, bringing with it the first conscripted intakes of new recruits to the growing branch. Two years later, the Armoured Regiment was raised becoming the administrative formation of the country's new armoured forces.

In 1972, Parliament passed further legislation (the Singapore Armed Forces Act) to reorganise and consolidate the armed forces' disparate commands and administrative functions.[7][8]

The Army celebrated its 60th Anniversary in 2017.

Military Deployments

MissionEdit

The stated mission of the Singapore Armed Forces is to deter armed aggression, and to secure a swift and decisive victory should deterrence fail. The Army is also tasked with conducting peace-time operations to further Singapore's national interests and foreign policy. These range from disaster relief to peacekeeping, hostage-rescue and other contingencies.[11]

The Army views technology as a force-multiplier and a means to sustain combat power given Singapore's population constraints. Jointness across three branches of the SAF is integral to the Army's warfighting doctrine. Joint operations undertaken with the Navy and Air Force include amphibious landings and critical disaster relief operations in the aftermath of the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake.

The Army has a technically proficient, relatively well-educated draftee pool and officer corps (non-commissioned and commissioned) reflective of the population at large, and has sought to leverage this to ease its transition into a more sophisticated, networked fighting force.[12]

Combat readiness is a linchpin of Army policy, and military exercises up to divisional level are conducted many times yearly, simulating full-spectrum operations, up to and including full-scale war. Divisional war games are a combined arms, tri-service affair involving the Republic of Singapore Navy and Air Force. Because training space is limited in Singapore—artillery fire would quickly traverse the island—some military exercises are conducted overseas. Reservists periodically [13] train abroad, their units regularly evaluated for combat readiness.[12] The Army also trains bilaterally with some host nations, and military exchanges are frequent. Training is billed as "tough, realistic and safe," with a premium on safety, given the sensitivity of military deaths in a largely conscript army.[11]

Following the Revolution in Military Affairs, and in tandem with modernizing its weapons systems, the Army is forging a transition to a more network-centric fighting doctrine that better integrates the Air Force and Navy.[14]

List of chiefs of ArmyEdit

Years in office Name Vocation
1990–1990 Boey Tak Hap [citation needed]
1990–1992 Ng Jui Ping Artillery
1992–1995 Lim Neo Chian Combat Engineers
1995–1998 Han Eng Juan Armour[citation needed]
1998–2000 Lim Chuan Poh Infantry
2000–2003 Ng Yat Chung Artillery
2003–2007 Desmond Kuek Armour
2007–2010 Neo Kian Hong Guards
2010–2011 Chan Chun Sing Infantry
2011–2014 Ravinder Singh Signals
2014–2015 Perry Lim Guards
2015–2018 Melvyn Ong Infantry[15]
2018–2022 Goh Si Hou Artillery[16][17]
2022–present David Neo Commando[18]

OrganisationEdit

Singapore Army
 
Components
Organisation
History and Traditions
Military history of Singapore
Equipment
Weapons of the Singapore Army
Personnel
Singapore Armed Forces ranks
class=notpageimage|
Singapore Army – major combat units

The Army is headed by the Chief of Army (COA).[19] In the past, the Army was head by the Deputy Chief of the General Staff (Army). Assisting him are the Chief of Staff, General Staff[20] and Commander, TRADOC (Army Training and Doctrine Command).[21] There are six branches of the General Staff (G1-G6), a National Service Affairs Department (G8) dealing with National Service issues, and an Inspectorate. The six branches handle manpower (G1), intelligence (G2), operations (G3), logistics (G4), planning (G5) and training (G6) respectively. Each department is headed by an Assistant Chief of the General Staff (ACGS). Also advising the Chief of Army are the Senior Specialist Staff Officers (SSSOs) of the various formations (Infantry, Guards, Armour, Commandos, Artillery, Combat Engineers, Maintenance & Engineering, Transport, Supply and Signals).[22][23]

Combat ArmsEdit

The Army consists of seven Combat Arms, from which are derived Divisional and Non-divisional units:

These are bolstered by Combat Service Support Units comprising the following:

  • Army Intelligence
  • Army Medical Services
  • Army Maintenance and Engineering Support
  • Army Supply
  • Army Transport
  • Singapore Armed Forces Ammunition Command
  • Personnel Command (PERSCOM)

Divisional and non-divisional assetsEdit

Combined-Arms DivisionsEdit

The Army's main organizational components are its Combined-Arms Divisions, of which there are three active:[26] the 3rd, 6th and 9th Divisions.[27] They include both active and reserve units that are operationally ready, all subject to mobilization orders in the event of war.[13]

3rd Singapore DivisionEdit

3rd Singapore Division (motto: "Foremost and Utmost") consists of the following subordinate units:[citation needed]

  • HQ 3rd Singapore Division
  • 3rd Singapore Infantry Brigade
  • 5th Singapore Infantry Brigade
  • 24th Singapore Infantry Brigade
  • 30th Singapore Infantry Brigade
  • 8th Singapore Armoured Brigade
  • 3rd Division Artillery HQ
  • 3rd Division Support Command
  • 30th Battalion, Singapore Combat Engineers
  • 3rd Division Air Defence Artillery Battalion
  • 3rd Signals Battalion
  • 17th Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence (C4I) Battalion

Under the Division-National Cadet Corps (NCC) affiliation scheme, NCC West District is affiliated to the 3rd Division.[citation needed]

6th Singapore Division/Headquarters Sense & StrikeEdit

6th Singapore Division/Headquarters Sense & Strike (motto: "Swift and Deadly") consists of the following subordinate units:[citation needed]

  • HQ 6th Singapore Division
  • HQ Singapore Artillery
  • 2nd Singapore Infantry Brigade
  • 9th Singapore Infantry Brigade
  • 76th Singapore Infantry Brigade
  • 54th Singapore Armoured Brigade
  • 6th Division Artillery HQ
  • 6th Division Support Command
  • 31st Battalion, Singapore Combat Engineers
  • 6th Division Air Defence Artillery Battalion
  • 6th Signals Battalion
  • HQ Army Intelligence

Under the Division-NCC affiliation, NCC Central District is affiliated to the 6th Division.[citation needed]

9th Singapore Division/Infantry

9th Division/Infantry (motto: "Forging Ahead) consists of the following subordinate units:[citation needed]

Organisation:

  • HQ 9th Singapore Division
  • 10th Singapore Infantry Brigade
  • 12th Singapore Infantry Brigade
  • 56th Singapore Armoured Brigade
  • 9th Division Artillery HQ
  • 9th Division Support Command
  • 32nd Battalion, Singapore Combat Engineers
  • 9th Division Air Defence Artillery Battalion
  • 9th Signals Battalion

Under the Division-NCC affiliation, NCC East District is affiliated to the 9th Division/Infantry.[citation needed]

MINDEF Reserve (MR) NS DivisionsEdit

2 People's Defence ForceEdit

2 People's Defence Force (PDF) is responsible for homeland security, including that of key civilian installations and infrastructure. 2 PDF is also responsible for the coordination and secondment of military resources to civilian agencies in the event of a civil emergency.[28]

Organisation:[citation needed]

  • HQ 2 People's Defence Force
  • HQ 21 Singapore Infantry Brigade
  • HQ 22 Singapore Infantry Brigade
  • HQ 26 Singapore Infantry Brigade
  • HQ 27 Singapore Infantry Brigade
  • HQ 29 Singapore Infantry Brigade
  • HQ 32 Singapore Infantry Brigade
  • 326th Battalion, Singapore Combat Engineers
  • Island Defence Training Institute (IDTI)
  • 15th Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence (C4I) Battalion
Army Operational Reserve (AOR)Edit

21st Division[29]

25th Division[29]

Non-Divisional Units, some appended to the General StaffEdit

  • HQ Signals
  • HQ Commandos
    • Commando Battalion (1CDO – 1st Commando Battalion)
    • Special Operations Task Force – Joint task force consisting of members from the Naval Diving Unit, Commandos and the Special Operations Force
  • Army Deployment Force - A high readiness, regular only unit that provides the Army with specialised capabilities for a full spectrum of Operations. Including but not limited to, Support for Special Operations Task Force (SOTF), Peace-Time Contingency Operations (PTCO), Peace Support Operations (PSO) and Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief (HADR) missions.
  • Aggressor Company – subordinate to TRADOC/ATEC, this company-sized detachment organizes itself according to the hypothesized enemy's order of battle and acts as the OPFOR in training evaluations. They are the 'red' opposing force in ATEC evaluations.
  • Military Medicine Institute
  • Force Medical Protection Command[30]
    • Biodefence Centre (BDFC) – Company-sized Epidemiology Unit
    • Medical Response Force (MRF) – Battalion-sized counter-chemical and counter-biological warfare unit, staffed by combat medics.
  • HQ Armour
    • 4th Singapore Armoured Brigade (Likely part of unknown Armoured Division)
    • 48 SAR – MBT Battalion (Operating Leopard 2SGs)
  • HQ Army Combat Engineer Group
  • HQ Chemical, Biological, Radiological & Explosives Defence Group

EquipmentEdit

BasesEdit

Name Location Unit(s)
Amoy Quee Camp Ang Mo Kio
Bedok Camp I/II Bedok
  • 1st Guards Battalion[32]
  • 3rd Guards Battalion[32]
  • HQ 7th Singapore Infantry Brigade (HQ 7 SIB)[32]
  • HQ 13th Singapore Infantry Brigade (HQ 13 SIB)[32]
  • Bedok Fitness Conditioning Centre (Bedok FCC)[33]
Clementi Camp Clementi
  • HQ 2 People's Defence Force (HQ 2 PDF)[34]
  • Island Defence Training Institute (IDTI)
  • 8th Battalion Singapore Infantry Regiment (8 SIR)
  • 15th Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and Intelligence Battalion (15 C4I)
Depot Road Camp Telok Blangah
Dieppe Barracks Yishun
Gombak Base Bukit Batok
Hendon Camp Changi
  • 1st Commando Battalion (1 CDO BN)[37][38]
Jurong Camp I Jurong
Jurong Camp II Jurong
Kaki Bukit Camp Paya Lebar
  • SAF Driving School (SAFDS)[citation needed]
Keat Hong Camp Tengah
  • HQ 8th Singapore Armoured Brigade (HQ 8 SAB)[32]
  • 40th Battalion, Singapore Armoured Regiment (40 SAR)
  • 41st Battalion, Singapore Armoured Regiment (41 SAR)
Khatib Camp Yishun
  • HQ Singapore Artillery (HQ SA)[citation needed]
  • Artillery Institute (AI)[citation needed]
  • 23rd Battalion Singapore Artillery (23 SA)[32]
  • 24th Battalion Singapore Artillery (24 SA)[32]
  • Khatib Fitness Conditioning Centre (Khatib FCC)[41]
Mowbray Camp Kranji
Kranji Camp II Kranji
  • 21st Battalion Singapore Artillery (21 SA)[32]
  • SAF Court Martial Centre[43]
  • Motorised Infantry Training Institute (MTI)[44]
  • Kranji Fitness Conditioning Centre (Kranji FCC)[45]
  • Basic Military Training Centre School V (BMTC School 5)[46]
Kranji Camp III Kranji
  • HQ Combat Service and Support Command (HQ CSSCOM)[47][48]
  • HQ Maintenance and Engineering Support (HQ MES)[48]
  • HQ Transport Formation[48]
  • HQ Supply Formation[48]
  • HQ SAF Ammunition Command (HQ SAFAC)
  • Supply Base Central
  • School of Logistics (SOL)[48]
  • Army Logistics Training Institute (ALTI)[40][48]
  • Army Logistics Training Centre (ALTC)[48]
  • 1st Army Maintenance Base (1 AMB)[48]
  • Ordnance Engineering Training Institute (OETI)[48]
  • Ordnance Engineering Training Centre (OETC)[48]
  • School of Manpower Management (SMP)[48]
  • HQ 3rd Singapore Infantry Brigade (HQ 3 SIB)[47]
  • 2nd Battalion Singapore Infantry Regiment (2 SIR)[47]
  • 5th Battalion Singapore Infantry Regiment (5 SIR)
Ladang Camp Pulau Tekong
  • HQ Basic Military Training Centre (HQ BMTC)
  • Basic Military Training Centre School I (BMTC School 1)
  • Basic Military Training Centre School II (BMTC School 2)
  • Basic Military Training Centre School III (BMTC School 3)
Rocky Hill Camp
  • Basic Military Training Centre School IV (BMTC School 4)
Maju Camp Clementi
  • 6th Battalion Singapore Infantry Regiment (6 SIR)
  • 9th Battalion Singapore Infantry Regiment (9 SIR)[49]
  • HQ 24th Singapore Infantry Brigade (HQ 24 SIB)[32]
  • HQ 30th Singapore Infantry Brigade (HQ 30 SIB)[32]
  • HQ SAF Volunteer Corps (SAFVC)[50]
  • Maju Fitness Conditioning Centre (Maju FCC)[51]
Mandai Hill Camp Mandai
  • HQ 6th Singapore Division (HQ 6 DIV)[52]
  • 1st Battalion Singapore Infantry Regiment (1 SIR)[52]
  • 6th Signal Battalion[52]
  • HQ 2nd Singapore Infantry Brigade (HQ 2 SIB)[32]
  • 11th Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and Intelligence Battalion (11 C4I)
  • 16th Command, Control, Communications, Computers, and Intelligence Battalion (16 C4I)
Nee Soon Camp Yishun
  • Army Deployment Force
  • HQ Singapore Combat Engineers (HQ SCE)[citation needed]
  • Engineer Training Institute (ETI)[citation needed]
  • 36th Battalion Singapore Combat Engineers (36 SCE)[32]
  • CBRE Engineers Training Centre (CETC)
  • HQ Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Explosive Defence Group (HQ CBRE DG)[53]
  • 39th Battalion Singapore Combat Engineers (39 SCE)[54]
  • HQ SAF Medical Corps (HQ MC)[citation needed]
  • HQ Army Medical Services (HQ AMS)[citation needed]
  • SAF Medical Training Institute (SMTI)[citation needed]
  • Singapore Armed Forces Bands (SAF BANDS)[citation needed]
  • SAF Music and Drama Company (SAFMDC)[citation needed]
  • HQ 22nd Singapore Infantry Brigade (HQ 22 SIB)[citation needed]
Nee Soon Driclad Yishun
  • 6th Army Maintenance Base (6 AMB)[55]
  • Supply Base North
Pasir Laba Camp Jurong
  • HQ Specialist and Warrant Officer Institute (HQ SWI)
  • Specialist Cadet School (SCS)
  • SAF Warrant Officer School (SAF WOS)
  • Army Training Doctrine Command (TRADOC)
  • Training Resource Management Centre (TRMC)
  • Army Training Evaluation Centre (ATEC)
  • School of Infantry Weapons (SIW)
  • SAF Military Intelligence Institute (SMI)
  • Imagery and Geographical School (IGS)
  • School of Army Reconnaissance (SOAR)
  • HQ Army Intelligence
  • Army Fitness Centre (AFC)
  • Basic Combat Training Centre (BCTC)
  • SAF Printing Centre
  • Transport Hub West
Pasir Ris Camp Pasir Ris
  • Commando Training Institute (CDO TI)[56]
  • Special Operations Tactical Support Centre (SOTSC)[57]
Rifle Range Road Camp Bukit Timah
  • HQ General Support Ammunition Base (HQ GSAB)
SAFTI Military Institute Jurong
Selarang Camp Changi
Seletar Camp Seletar
Sembawang Camp Sembawang
Stagmont Camp Choa Chu Kang
Sungei Gedong Camp Lim Chu Kang

Photo galleryEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

Notes
  1. ^ a b International Institute for Strategic Studies (25 February 2021). The Military Balance 2021. London: Routledge. p. 297. ISBN 9781032012278.
  2. ^ "1957 – Our First Battalion". MINDEF. Archived from the original on 7 October 2007. Retrieved 22 March 2010.
  3. ^ "1963 – Konfrontasi". MINDEF. Archived from the original on 7 October 2007. Retrieved 22 March 2010.
  4. ^ "1963 – Pioneering Spirit of 2 SIR". MINDEF. Archived from the original on 7 October 2007. Retrieved 22 March 2010.
  5. ^ "Fact Sheet: Recipients of the SAF Medal for Distinguished Act".
  6. ^ "The Singapore Army Is Established". HistorySG. National Library Board Singapore. Archived from the original on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 25 February 2016.
  7. ^ "Singapore Armed Forces Act". Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 25 February 2016.
  8. ^ "Singapore Armed Forces Come Into Effect". HistorySG. National Library Board Singapore. Archived from the original on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 25 February 2016.
  9. ^ "Singapore Armed Forces Concludes Deployment in Afghanistan". Archived from the original on 3 March 2016. Retrieved 25 February 2016.
  10. ^ "Joint Statement Issued by Partners at the Counter-ISIL Coalition Ministerial Meeting". Office of Website Management, Bureau of Public Affairs. Office of the Spokesperson, Washington, DC. Archived from the original on 14 May 2018. Retrieved 25 February 2016.
  11. ^ a b "The Singapore Army- About Us". MINDEF. Archived from the original on 11 August 2017. Retrieved 21 May 2011.
  12. ^ a b Tim Huxley, Defending the Lion City, Allen & Unwin, 2000, p.65.
  13. ^ a b "NS Matters - Home". Archived from the original on 25 May 2017. Retrieved 24 December 2014.
  14. ^ "The 3rd Generation SAF". MINDEF. Archived from the original on 6 October 2007. Retrieved 23 August 2007.
  15. ^ Ganesan, Deepanraj (29 June 2018). "Defence chief heads SAF promotion list". The Straits Times.
  16. ^ "Singapore appoints new defence, army chiefs". Channel News Asia. 12 March 2018. Retrieved 20 February 2021.
  17. ^ "Change in Chief of Defence Force and Chief of Army" (PDF). MINDEF – National Archives of Singapore. 12 March 2018. Archived (PDF) from the original on 23 February 2021. Retrieved 23 February 2021.
  18. ^ "Change in Chief of Army". 11 February 2022. Retrieved 15 February 2022.
  19. ^ "Organisation Structure". Archived from the original on 29 October 2019. Retrieved 16 September 2019.
  20. ^ "Organisation Structure". The Singapore Army. Archived from the original on 28 September 2015. Retrieved 24 December 2014.
  21. ^ "File Not Found". www.mindef.gov.sg. Archived from the original on 10 September 2018. Retrieved 16 September 2019.
  22. ^ "gov.sg – Directory". Archived from the original on 24 December 2014. Retrieved 24 December 2014.
  23. ^ "gov.sg – Directory". Archived from the original on 24 December 2014. Retrieved 24 December 2014.
  24. ^ "Armour". The Singapore Army. Archived from the original on 30 November 2014. Retrieved 24 December 2014.
  25. ^ "Artillery". The Singapore Army. Archived from the original on 2 December 2014. Retrieved 24 December 2014.
  26. ^ "gov.sg – Directory". Archived from the original on 24 December 2014. Retrieved 24 December 2014.
  27. ^ See also [1], and Huxley, Defending the Lion City, 2000, pp. 123–126
  28. ^ "2 People's Defence Force". The Singapore Army. Archived from the original on 26 April 2015. Retrieved 24 December 2014.
  29. ^ a b "Army". Archived from the original on 8 September 2020. Retrieved 18 May 2020.
  30. ^ "FORCE MEDICAL PROTECTION IN THE SAF" (PDF). Archived (PDF) from the original on 21 April 2018. Retrieved 21 April 2018.
  31. ^ "National Cadet Corps – Singapore – About". Facebook. National Cadet Corps. Retrieved 25 September 2018.[unreliable source?]
  32. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r Jane's Sentinel Security Assessment – Southeast Asia. Jane's Information Group. 2017.
  33. ^ "Bedok FCC (East)". ns.sg. Ministry of Defence. Retrieved 25 September 2018.
  34. ^ S. M. Maran; Koh Boon Pin (2000). S. M. Maran; Santokh Singh; Goh Choon Lee; Koh Boon Pin; Chao Ning; Ng We Yuan (eds.). LIONS IN DEFENCE: THE 2 PDF STORY. 2 PDF Command Officers' Mess. Retrieved 25 September 2018.
  35. ^ Chow, Jermyn (2 October 2014). "Send-off spot where they go from boys to men". The Straits Times. Retrieved 25 September 2018.
  36. ^ "Home > Contact > General". Retrieved 25 September 2018.
  37. ^ "Commandos". mindef.gov.sg. Singapore Army. Retrieved 26 September 2018.
  38. ^ Tan Xing Qi (30 June 2015). "29 things everybody needs to know about the S'pore Commandos". Mothership.sg. Retrieved 26 September 2018.
  39. ^ "3rd Singapore Division (3 DIV)". globalsecurity.org. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  40. ^ a b c "Enhanced Connectivity to workplace during ICT" (PDF). Ministry of Defence. 11 September 2009. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  41. ^ "Khatib FCC (North)". ns.sg. Ministry of Defence. Retrieved 25 September 2018.
  42. ^ Sin, Tino (2006). Pride, Discipline, Honour (PDF). SAF Provost Media Department, Ministry of Defence, Singapore.
  43. ^ Ong, Reuben (27 August 2015). "Series 1.1: Summary Trial vs. General Court Martial". mjp.sg. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  44. ^ "SAF begins maintenance, inspection work on returned Terrex vehicles". TODAY. 31 January 2017. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  45. ^ "Kranji FCC (West)". ns.sg. Ministry of Defence. Retrieved 25 September 2018.
  46. ^ "Enlistment Notice". cmpb.gov.sg. Ministry of Defence. Retrieved 25 September 2018.
  47. ^ a b c "Saving Travelling Time through a Ground-Up Initiative!". Facebook. Singapore Army. 9 July 2018. Archived from the original on 26 February 2022. Retrieved 25 September 2018.[unreliable source?]
  48. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Tan, Sheena (6 January 2009). "CSSCOM breaking new ground with Integrated HQ". mindef.gov.sg. Ministry of Defence. Retrieved 26 September 2018.
  49. ^ "9 SIR Turns Operationally Ready". Facebook. Singapore Army. 23 November 2016. Archived from the original on 26 February 2022. Retrieved 27 September 2018.[unreliable source?]
  50. ^ "About SAFVC". mindef.gov.sg. Ministry of Defence. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  51. ^ "Maju FCC (South)". ns.sg. Ministry of Defence. Retrieved 25 September 2018.
  52. ^ a b c "6th Singapore Division (6 DIV)". globalsecurity.org. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  53. ^ "Inauguration of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Explosives (CBRE) Defence Group". MINDEF. 8 February 2007. Archived from the original on 31 October 2018. Retrieved 31 October 2018.
  54. ^ Cheow, Shawn; Lim, Gershwin (29 October 2018). "39 SCE Silver Jubilee Parade". Facebook. Singapore Army. Retrieved 31 October 2018.[unreliable source?]
  55. ^ "Soldier collapses and dies after run". AsiaOne. 13 March 2009. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  56. ^ Wang Tianjie (30 June 2016). "Commandos – they are the best yet again". The Straits Times. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  57. ^ Lim Min Zhang (30 June 2018). "SAF innovations that improve training, save time, and increase readiness". The Straits Times. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  58. ^ "9th Division/Infantry". globalsecurity.org. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  59. ^ Cheng, Kenneth (2 March 2018). "Tekong-bound: All recruits from army combat units get basic training at BMTC". TODAY. MediaCorp. Retrieved 25 September 2018.
  60. ^ a b "9 things ABTM3 didn't tell you about Sembawang Camp". nexus. Ministry of Defence. 30 December 2015. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  61. ^ "Newly-minted CSSCOM Warriors: The Graduation Ceremony". Facebook. Singapore Army. 10 October 2013. Retrieved 27 September 2018.[unreliable source?]
  62. ^ "Moving the Army – CSSCOM Milestone Parade". Facebook. Singapore Army. 28 October 2014. Retrieved 25 September 2018.[unreliable source?]
  63. ^ "The Singapore Army – Signals – History". mindef.gov.sg. Singapore Army. 13 November 2006. Archived from the original on 5 September 2008. Retrieved 25 September 2008.
  64. ^ "Tri-Service Warfighter Course (TSWC)". mindef.gov.sg. Ministry of Defence. Retrieved 27 September 2018.
  65. ^ "Make-A-Wish Foundation Singapore: Soldier for a Day". Facebook. Singapore Army. 26 July 2018. Archived from the original on 26 February 2022. Retrieved 27 September 2018.[unreliable source?]
  66. ^ "Royal Brunei Land Forces Commander Visits HQ 4 SAB". Facebook. Singapore Army. 10 April 2018. Retrieved 27 September 2018.[unreliable source?]
  67. ^ a b "Home Sweet Home – HQ 4SAB & 12 C4I Homecoming Run". Facebook. Singapore Army. 6 January 2015. Retrieved 27 September 2018.[unreliable source?]
Bibliography
  • Tim, Huxley. Defending the Lion City: the Armed Forces of Singapore. Publisher: Allen & Unwin Pty LTD, 2000. ISBN 1-86508-118-3.
Further reading

External linksEdit

  • Official website
  • Singapore Army Official Ranks Website
  • Ranks and Paramilitary Ranks of Singapore, accessed 23 October 2006.
  • Singapore Infantry Regiment pictures and info