Spaceport Camden
Spaceport Camden logo.png
Summary
LocationWoodbine, Georgia
Coordinates30°55′39″N 81°30′53″W / 30.92750°N 81.51472°W / 30.92750; -81.51472
Websitespaceportcamden.us

Spaceport Camden is a proposed spaceport in Camden County, Georgia, near the city of Woodbine. The proposed site tested the largest solid rocket motor ever fired as part of the Apollo Program and Camden County, Georgia was originally considered as a NASA launch site in the 1960s. Spaceport Camden began limited development as a rocket launch facility in early 2014, with its first launch taking place in August 2017.

History

During the early 1960s, Camden County in Georgia was considered by NASA as a potential launch site for the Apollo program.[1] A site on Merritt Island, Florida was selected instead;[2] however some rocket testing for the Apollo program took place on the Georgia site.[3]

In November 2012, the Camden County Joint Development Authority voted unanimously to "explore developing an aero-spaceport facility" at an Atlantic coastal site to support both horizontal and vertical launch operations, in hopes of attracting a SpaceX launch facility.[4] SpaceX selected a location near Brownsville, Texas for its launch site.[5] However, in June 2015 the county authorized environmental studies, purchasing a former Bayer CropScience and Thiokol industrial location to pursue the development of a spaceport.[2][6] At the time, it was believed that the site, comprising 400 acres (160 ha),[7] could see launches begin by 2020.[2]

In March 2017, despite opposition from Cumberland Island residents concerned about disturbance to Cumberland Island National Seashore and the possibility of injuries and damage from launches,[3] and belief that the Federal Aviation Administration was unlikely to authorize launches due to the fact that launch trajectories would pass over inhabited areas,[8] the Georgia General Assembly approved legislation offering limited liability protection to launches from the proposed spaceport,[9] and in May Governor Nathan Deal signed the Georgia Space Flight Act, fully authorizing the development.[10] A 2017 study by Georgia Southern University determined that the spaceport could provide $22.5 million in yearly revenue to the region.[11]

In March 2018, the FAA, the US regulatory agency for spaceports, approved the "draft status" of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the spaceport.[12]

Facilities and operations

External image
The Vector-R is launched at Spaceport Camden.[13]

The planned facilities at Spaceport Camden include a vertical launch site, a landing facility, and a control center, with provision for viewing facilities.[3] Up to twelve launches and twelve landings a year would be permitted.[3] The construction of an innovation and research park at the spaceport has been proposed to attract additional technology-based industry and create jobs.[14]

In April 2017, Vector Space Systems announced that they would use the Spaceport Camden site to conduct a suborbital rocket test that summer.[15] On 2 August 2017, the first launch from Spaceport Camden, of a Vector-R rocket, successfully took place.[16]

Launch history

Launch Date (UTC) Vehicle Payload Launch pad Result Remarks
1 2 August 2017, 17:15 Vector-R Imaging and medicinal research Harriett's Bluff Road Success [17][18]

References

  1. ^ Dilsaver, Lary M. (2004). Cumberland Island National Seashore: A History of Conservation Conflict. Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press. p. 63. ISBN 0-8139-2268-2. Retrieved 11 November 2017.
  2. ^ a b c Chapman, Dan (30 July 2015). "Camden County sky high on spaceport plan, but others want it grounded". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Atlanta, GA. Retrieved 11 November 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d Landers, Mary (25 February 2017). "Camden spaceport promises jobs, threatens islands". Savannah Morning News. Savannah, GA. Retrieved 11 November 2017.
  4. ^ Dickson, Terry (16 November 2012). "Camden County wants to open Georgia's first spaceport". The Florida Times-Union. Retrieved 11 November 2017.
  5. ^ Berger, Eric (4 August 2014). "Texas, SpaceX announce spaceport deal near Brownsville". Houston Chronicle. Retrieved 11 November 2017.
  6. ^ "FAA moving forward on proposed spaceport". The Brunswick News. Brunswick, GA. 9 November 2015. Retrieved 11 November 2017.
  7. ^ Karkaria, Urvaksh; Dave Williams (31 July 2017). "Go for launch: Rocket receives approval for Georgia's first commercial spaceport". Atlanta Business Chronicle. Atlanta, GA. Retrieved 11 November 2017.
  8. ^ "FAA provides update on status of proposed Georgia spaceport". Athens Banner-Herald. Athens, GA. 5 February 2017. Retrieved 11 November 2017.
  9. ^ Williams, Dave (23 March 2017). "Spaceport Camden bill gains final passage in General Assembly". Atlanta Business Chronicle. Atlanta, GA. Retrieved 11 November 2017.
  10. ^ Hoskinson, Syd (16 May 2017). "Launches From Georgia's Camden Spaceport Could Start In 2020". WJCT. Jacksonville, FL. Retrieved 11 November 2017.
  11. ^ "Study: Spaceport Camden could generate more than $22M in revenue each year". WJXT. Jacksonville, FL. 24 August 2017. Retrieved 11 November 2017.
  12. ^ https://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/news/2018/03/12/georgias-spaceport-dream-takes-giant-leap-toward.html
  13. ^ Russell, Kendall (4 August 2017). "Vector Launches First Ever Rocket from Spaceport Camden". Satellite Today. Via Satellite. Retrieved 30 November 2017.
  14. ^ "Camden County promotes innovation, research park". WJXT. Jacksonville, FL. 6 November 2017. Retrieved 11 November 2017.
  15. ^ "Georgia's Space Industry Gets Ready To Blast Off". WABE. Atlanta, GA. 14 April 2017. Retrieved 11 November 2017.
  16. ^ Henning, Allyson (2 August 2017). "Camden Spaceport sees 1st launch". WJXT. Jacksonville, FL. Archived from the original on 11 November 2017. Retrieved 11 November 2017.
  17. ^ "Vector Successfully Launches First Ever Rocket from Spaceport Camden". PR Newswire. Cision. 3 August 2017. Retrieved 11 November 2017.
  18. ^ Dickson, Terry (3 August 2017). "Small rocket flies from planned Spaceport Camden". The Florida Times-Union. Jacksonville, FL. Retrieved 11 November 2017.

External links

  • Official website