Strymon (mythology)

Summary

O: head of river-god Strymon R: trident This coin was struck by Serdi tribe in 187-168 BC or later. It's an overstrike on official Macedonian coin and imitates another Macedonian type.

For the river, see Strymon/Struma

In Greek mythology, Strymon (/stryˈmɔːn/; Ancient Greek: Στρυμών) was a river-god and son of the Titans Oceanus and his sister-wife Tethys.[1] He was a king of Thrace.[2] By the Muses,[3] Euterpe[4] or Calliope[5] or Terpsichore,[6] he became the father of Rhesus. His other sons were Olynthus[7] and Brangas.[2]

Neaera bore Strymon's daughter, Evadne who became the wife of King Argus.[8] He was also the father of Tereine who mothered Thrassa by the god Ares.[9] Another daughter, Rhodope became the mother of Athos by Poseidon.[10]

Notes

  1. ^ Hesiod, Theogony 339
  2. ^ a b Conon, Narrations, 4
  3. ^ Euripides, Rhesus 347
  4. ^ Servius, Commentary on Virgil's Aeneid 1.469
  5. ^ Apollodorus, 1.3.4
  6. ^ Eustathius on Homer, Iliad p. 817
  7. ^ Stephanus of Byzantium, Ethnica s.v. Olynthus
  8. ^ Apollodorus, 2.1.2
  9. ^ Antoninus Liberalis, Metamorphosis 21
  10. ^ Scholia on Theocritus, Idyll 7.76

References

  • Antoninus Liberalis, The Metamorphoses of Antoninus Liberalis translated by Francis Celoria (Routledge 1992). Online version at the Topos Text Project.
  • Apollodorus, The Library with an English Translation by Sir James George Frazer, F.B.A., F.R.S. in 2 Volumes, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1921. ISBN 0-674-99135-4. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
  • Conon, Fifty Narrations, surviving as one-paragraph summaries in the Bibliotheca (Library) of Photius, Patriarch of Constantinople translated from the Greek by Brady Kiesling. Online version at the Topos Text Project.
  • Euripides, The Rhesus of Euripides translated into English rhyming verse with explanatory notes by Gilbert Murray, LL.D., D.Litt., F.B.A., Regius Professor of Greek in the University of Oxford. Euripides. Gilbert Murray. New York. Oxford University Press. 1913. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Euripides, Euripidis Fabulae. vol. 3. Gilbert Murray. Oxford. Clarendon Press, Oxford. 1913. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Hesiod, Theogony from The Homeric Hymns and Homerica with an English Translation by Hugh G. Evelyn-White, Cambridge, MA.,Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1914. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
  • Maurus Servius Honoratus, In Vergilii carmina comentarii. Servii Grammatici qui feruntur in Vergilii carmina commentarii; recensuerunt Georgius Thilo et Hermannus Hagen. Georgius Thilo. Leipzig. B. G. Teubner. 1881. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Stephanus of Byzantium, Stephani Byzantii Ethnicorum quae supersunt, edited by August Meineike (1790-1870), published 1849. A few entries from this important ancient handbook of place names have been translated by Brady Kiesling. Online version at the Topos Text Project.

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainSmith, William, ed. (1870). Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. Missing or empty |title= (help)