Terbium(III) oxide

Summary

Terbium(III) oxide, also known as terbium sesquioxide, is a sesquioxide of the rare earth metal terbium, having chemical formula Tb
2
O
3
. It is a p-type semiconductor, which conducts protons, which is enhanced when doped with calcium.[3] It may be prepared by the reduction of Tb
4
O
7
in hydrogen at 1300 °C for 24 hours.[4]

Terbium(III) oxide
Tl2O3structure.jpg
Names
IUPAC name
terbium(III) oxide
Other names
terbium trioxide, terbia, terbium sesquioxide
Identifiers
  • 12036-41-8 checkY
3D model (JSmol)
  • Interactive image
ECHA InfoCard 100.031.668 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 234-849-5
  • 159410
  • DTXSID40276469 Edit this at Wikidata
  • InChI=1/3O.2Tb/q3*-2;2*+3
  • [O-2].[O-2].[O-2].[Tb+3].[Tb+3]
Properties
O3Tb2
Molar mass 365.848 g·mol−1
Appearance white crystals
Density 7.91 g/cm3
Melting point 2,410 °C (4,370 °F; 2,680 K)
0.07834 cm3/mol
Structure
Cubic, cI80
Ia3, No. 206[1]
a = 1.057 nm
Thermochemistry
156.90 J/mol·K [2]
-1865.23 kJ/mol [2]
-1776.553 kJ/mol [2]
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS07: Exclamation markGHS09: Environmental hazard
Warning
H319, H410
P264, P273, P280, P305+P351+P338, P337+P313, P391, P501
Related compounds
Other anions
Terbium(III) chloride
Other cations
Gadolinium(III) oxide
Dysprosium(III) oxide
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
checkY verify (what is checkY☒N ?)
Infobox references
Tb4O7 + H2 → 2 Tb2O3 + H2O

It is a basic oxide and easily dissolved to dilute acids, and then almost colourless terbium salt is formed.

Tb2O3 + 6 H+ → 2 Tb3+ + 3 H2O

The crystal structure is cubic and the lattice constant is a = 1057 pm.[5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Curzon A.E.; Chlebek H.G. (1973). "The observation of face centred cubic Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er and Tm in the form of thin films and their oxidation". J. Phys. F. 3 (1): 1–5. doi:10.1088/0305-4608/3/1/009.
  2. ^ a b c R. Robie, B. Hemingway, and J. Fisher, "Thermodynamic Properties of Minerals and Related Substances at 298.15K and 1bar Pressure and at Higher Temperatures," US Geol. Surv., vol. 1452, 1978.[1]
  3. ^ Reidar Haugsrud; Yngve Larring & Truls Norby (December 2005). "Proton conductivity of Ca-doped Tb
    2
    O
    3
    ". Solid State Ionics. Elsevier B.V. 176 (39–40): 2957–2961. doi:10.1016/j.ssi.2005.09.030.
  4. ^ G. J. McCarthy (October 1971). "Crystal data on C-type terbium sesquioxide (Tb
    2
    O
    3
    )". Journal of Applied Crystallography. 4 (5): 399–400. doi:10.1107/S0021889871007295.
  5. ^ N. C. Baenzinger, H. A. Eick, H. S. Schuldt, L. Eyring: Terbium Oxides. III. X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Several Stable Phases. In: Journal of the American Chemical Society, 1961, 83, 10, S. 2219-23.