Thallium(I) hydroxide

Summary

Thallium(I) hydroxide[1]
TlOH.png
Names
IUPAC name
thallium(I) hydroxide
Other names
thallous hydroxide
Identifiers
  • 12026-06-1 checkY
3D model (JSmol)
  • Interactive image
ChemSpider
  • 141413 checkY
ECHA InfoCard 100.031.540 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 234-708-8
  • 160963
UNII
  • 847N2ZKW5S checkY
  • DTXSID10894114 Edit this at Wikidata
  • InChI=1S/H2O.Tl/h1H2;/q;+1/p-1 checkY
    Key: QGYXCSSUHCHXHB-UHFFFAOYSA-M checkY
  • InChI=1/H2O.Tl/h1H2;/q;+1/p-1
    Key: QGYXCSSUHCHXHB-REWHXWOFAR
  • [Tl+].[OH-]
Properties
TlOH
Molar mass 221.390 g/mol
Appearance yellow needles
Density 7.44 g/cm3
Melting point decomposes at 139°C
34.3 g/100g at 18°C
Hazards
Occupational safety and health (OHS/OSH):
Main hazards
Very toxic

Corrosive Dangerous for the environment

GHS labelling:[2]
GHS06: ToxicGHS08: Health hazardGHS09: Environmental hazard
Danger
H300, H330, H373, H411
P260, P264, P270, P271, P273, P284, P301+P310, P304+P340, P310, P314, P320, P330, P391, P403+P233, P405, P501
NFPA 704 (fire diamond)
Thermochemistry
88.0 J·mol−1·K−1
-238.9 kJ·mol−1
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
☒N verify (what is checkY☒N ?)
Infobox references

Thallium(I) hydroxide, also called thallous hydroxide, TlOH, is a hydroxide of thallium, with thallium in oxidation state +1.

Synthesis

Thallium(I) hydroxide is obtained from the decomposition of thallium(I) ethoxide in water.[3]

C2H5OTl + H2O → TlOH + C2H5OH

This can also be done by direct reaction of thallium with ethanol and oxygen gas.

4 Tl + 2 C2H5OH + O2 → 2 C2H5OTl + 2 TlOH

Another method is the reaction between thallium(I) sulfate and barium hydroxide.

Tl2SO4 + Ba(OH)2 → 2 TlOH + BaSO4

Properties

Thallous hydroxide is a strong base; it dissociates to the thallous ion, Tl+, except in strongly basic conditions. Tl+ resembles an alkali metal ion, A+, such as Li+ or K+.

References

  1. ^ Lide, David R. (1998). Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (87 ed.). Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press. pp. 4–89, 5–16. ISBN 0-8493-0594-2.
  2. ^ "Thallium hydroxide". pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 12 December 2021.
  3. ^ Brauer, Georg; Baudler, Marianne (1975). Handbuch der Präparativen Anorganischen Chemie, Band I. (3rd ed.). Stuttgart: Ferdinand Enke. p. 883. ISBN 3-432-02328-6.