V830 Tauri b

Summary

V830 Tauri b
Discovery
Discovery dateJune 20, 2016
Radial velocity
Orbital characteristics
0.057±0.001 AU[1]
4.927±0.008 d[1]
Inclination55°±10°[1]
StarV830 Tauri
Physical characteristics
Mass0.70±0.12 MJ[1]
(222±38 d)

V830 Tauri b is an exoplanet orbiting around the young T Tauri star V830 Tauri, about 427 light-years (131 pc) away from Earth in the constellation of Taurus. The exoplanet has a young age of only about 2 million years.[2][3][4]

Characteristics

Orbit and mass

V830 Tauri b orbits its parent star every 4.93 days at a distance of 0.057 AU from its parent star.[1] This is about 7x closer to the host star than the planet Mercury is to the Sun. Its mass is about 70% that of Jupiter, and, because it is orbiting very close to its parent star, it is classified as a hot Jupiter.

Host star and age

The host star, V830 Tauri, is a T Tauri star that is the same mass of the Sun, but twice the radius. It has a surface temperature of 4250 ± 50 K. In comparison, the Sun has a surface temperature of 5778 K.[5] The star's age is estimated to be about 2 million years old, which makes it a very young star. For comparison, the Sun is 4.6 billion years old. The star has not yet fully contracted to become a main sequence star, which ties in with its bloated radius but similar mass to the Sun. Given its mass, it will likely be on the main sequence portion of its lifetime for about 10 billion years, much like the Sun.

Discovery

Significance

Previously, before the discovery of V830 Tauri b (and a slightly older planet named K2-33b, with an age around 5-10 million years), TW Hya b was discovered and disproven and PTFO 8-8695 b / CVSO 30 b was discovered with an age equally young and an orbit even closer. The yet unconfirmed objects are pending confirmation.[6] The discovery of V830 Tauri b, K2-33b and PTFO 8-8695 b / CVSO 30 b suggests that the formation and migration of close-in giant planets can occur on a timescale of only a few million years. The new discoveries support planet-disc interactions as the most likely mechanism for efficiently producing young hot Jupiters.[6]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e "V830 Tauri b". Retrieved 2016-06-22.
  2. ^ Newborn Giant Planet Grazes its Sun, IRAP / OMP Press Release, 2016 Jun 20
  3. ^ "'Hot Jupiter' planet orbiting newborn star surprises scientists" CBC News http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/hot-jupiter-1.3419412
  4. ^ "Discovery of 'baby' planets sheds light on planet and solar system formation" The Guardian
  5. ^ Fraser Cain (15 September 2008). "Temperature of the Sun". Universe Today. Retrieved 19 February 2011.
  6. ^ a b J.-F. Donati; et al. (20 June 2016). "A hot Jupiter orbiting a 2-million-year-old solar-mass T Tauri star". Nature. 534 (7609): 662–666. arXiv:1606.06236. Bibcode:2016Natur.534..662D. doi:10.1038/nature18305. PMID 27324847.

Coordinates: Sky map 04h 33m 10.033s, +24° 33′ 43.38″