Virginia's 3rd congressional district
Virginia US Congressional District 3 (since 2016).png
New boundaries of Virginia's 3rd congressional district since January 3, 2017.
Representative
  Robert C. Scott
DNewport News
Distribution
  • 95.01[1]% urban
  • 4.99% rural
Population (2016)739,169[2]
Median income$52,797[3]
Ethnicity
Cook PVID+16[4]

Virginia's third congressional district is a United States congressional district in the Commonwealth of Virginia, serving the independent cities of Franklin, Newport News, and Portsmouth, parts of the independent cities of Chesapeake, Hampton, Norfolk, and Suffolk, and all of the county of Isle of Wight. The current representative is Robert C. Scott (D).

2016 redistricting

This image shows the 2016 court-ordered VA Congressional districts.

The Virginia Legislature's 2012 redistricting was found unconstitutional and replaced with a court-ordered redistricting on January 16, 2016 for the 2016 elections.[5][6][7][8][9] One reason for the redistricting is the racial gerrymandering.[10][11] From 1993 to 2016, the 3rd had covered most of the majority-black precincts in and around Hampton Roads and Richmond. The court-drawn map shifted the area near Richmond to the 4th District. The dispute over the district borders went to the U.S. Supreme Court in Wittman v. Personhuballah.

Recent election results from statewide races

Year Office Results
1996 President Clinton 72–22%[citation needed]
Senator Warner 72–28%[citation needed]
1997 Governor Beyer 67–31%[citation needed]
Lieutenant Governor Payne 66–28%[citation needed]
Attorney General Dolan 64–36%[citation needed]
2000 President Gore 66–32%[citation needed]
Senator Robb 67–33%[citation needed]
2001 Governor Warner 71–28%[citation needed]
Lieutenant Governor Kaine 73–26%[citation needed]
Attorney General McEachin 63–37%[citation needed]
2004 President Kerry 66–33%[citation needed]
2008 President Obama 76–24%[citation needed]
2008 President Obama 76 24%[citation needed]
2016 President Clinton 63–32%[12]
2017 Governor Northam 68-31%[13]

Historical composition of the district

In 1788 Virginia's 3rd Congressional District consisted of all of modern Virginia including and west of the counties of Carroll, Floyd, Roanoke, Botetourt, Augusta and Rockingham. It also included what is today Pendleton County, West Virginia and also about the southern third of West Virginia which in 1788 was all Greenbrier County. This area that is today about 48 counties and 13 independent cities was in 1788 only nine counties.[14]

In the 1790 census this area had a population of 66,045.[15]

For the 1792 congressional elections the number of congressional districts in Virginia rose from 10 to 19. The only county that remained in the third district was Pendleton County. Harrison, Randolph, Hardy, Hampshire, Monongalia and Ohio Counties, all now in West Virginia were also in the district.[16] This was all of northern West Virginia except the far eastern panhandle area. The new district's 1790 population was 30,145.[17]

The 1800 Census lead to another increase in Virginia's congressional districts in 1802. The third district was again moved, this time to what was then Frederick and Shenandoah Counties in Virginia, which besides those counties also included the modern counties of Clarke, Warren and part of Page.[18] The new 3rd district had a population of 38,767 in 1800.[19]

For most of the time from the end of the Civil War to 1993, the 3rd District was a relatively compact district centered on Richmond.

The district's current configuration dates to 1993, when the Justice Department ordered Virginia to create a majority-minority district. At that time, portions of the old 1st, 2nd, 3rd and 4th districts were combined to create a new 3rd District.

As of 2016, the 3rd district has been ruled unconstitutional. The new map gave the 3rd a slight plurality of blacks.[20][21]

List of members representing the district

Representative Party Term Electoral history
District created March 4, 1789
Senator Andrew Moore.jpg
Andrew Moore
Anti-Administration March 4, 1789 –
March 3, 1793
Elected in 1789.
Re-elected in 1790.
Redistricted to the 2nd district.
Joseph Neville Anti-Administration March 4, 1793 –
March 3, 1795
Elected in 1793.
Lost re-election.
George Jackson Democratic-Republican March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1797
Elected in 1795.
Lost re-election.
James Machir.jpg
James Machir
Federalist March 4, 1797 –
March 3, 1799
Elected in 1797.
Retired.
George Jackson Democratic-Republican March 4, 1799 –
March 3, 1803
Elected in 1799.
Re-elected in 1801.
Redistricted to the 1st district and retired.
John Smith Democratic-Republican March 4, 1803 –
March 3, 1815
Redistricted from the 1st district and re-elected in 1803.
Re-elected in 1805.
Re-elected in 1807.
Re-elected in 1809.
Re-elected in 1811.
Re-elected in 1813.
Retired.
HenrySTucker.jpg
Henry S. Tucker
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1815 –
March 3, 1819
Elected in 1815.
Re-elected in 1817.
Elected Virginia State Senator.
Jared Williams Democratic-Republican March 4, 1819 –
March 3, 1823
[Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 17th district.
WSArcher.jpg
William S. Archer
Crawford Republican March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
Redistricted from the 17th district and re-elected in 1823.
Re-elected in 1825.
Re-elected in 1827.
Lost re-election.
Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1835
JohnWinstonJones.jpg
John W. Jones
Jacksonian March 4, 1835 –
March 3, 1837
[Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 6th district.
Democratic March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1843
Walter Coles Democratic March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1845
Redistricted from the 6th district.
Retired.
William M. Tredway Democratic March 4, 1845 –
March 3, 1847
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
Thomas S. Flournoy Whig March 4, 1847 –
March 3, 1849
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
Thomas H. Averett Democratic March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1853
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
JohnCaskie.jpg
John S. Caskie
Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1859
Redistricted from the 6th district.
Lost re-election.
Daniel C. DeJarnette.jpg
Daniel C. DeJarnette, Sr.
Independent Democratic March 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1861
[Data unknown/missing.]
Resigned.
Vacant March 4, 1861 –
January 27, 1870
Civil War
CharlesHPorter.jpg
Charles H. Porter
Republican January 27, 1870 –
March 3, 1873
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
JohnAmblerSmith.jpg
John A. Smith
Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
Gilbert Carlton Walker.gif
Gilbert C. Walker
Democratic March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1879
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
Joseph Johnston.jpg
Joseph E. Johnston
Democratic March 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1881
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
GeorgeDWise.jpg
George D. Wise
Democratic March 4, 1881 –
April 11, 1890
Election invalidated.
Edmund Waddill Jr. Republican April 12, 1890 –
March 3, 1891
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
GeorgeDWise.jpg
George D. Wise
Democratic March 4, 1891 –
March 3, 1895
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
TazewellEllett.jpg
Tazewell Ellett
Democratic March 4, 1895 –
March 3, 1897
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
John Lamb.jpg
John Lamb
Democratic March 4, 1897 –
March 3, 1913
[Data unknown/missing.]
Lost re-election.
Andrew J. Montague.jpg
Andrew J. Montague
Democratic March 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1933
[Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the at-large seat.
District eliminated March 4, 1933
District recreated: January 3, 1935
Andrew J. Montague.jpg
Andrew J. Montague
Democratic January 3, 1935 –
January 24, 1937
[Data unknown/missing.]
Died.
Vacant January 24, 1937 –
November 2, 1937
DaveESatterfield.jpg
David E. Satterfield Jr.
Democratic November 2, 1937 –
February 15, 1945
[Data unknown/missing.]
Resigned.
Vacant February 15, 1945 –
March 6, 1945
JVaughanGary.jpg
J. Vaughan Gary
Democratic March 6, 1945 –
January 3, 1965
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
David E Satterfield 3d.png
David E. Satterfield III
Democratic January 3, 1965 –
January 3, 1981
[Data unknown/missing.]
Retired.
TomBliley.jpg
Thomas J. Bliley Jr.
Republican January 3, 1981 –
January 3, 1993
[Data unknown/missing.]
Redistricted to the 7th district.
BobbyScott.jpg
Robert C. Scott
Democratic January 3, 1993 –
Present
Elected in 1992.

Election results

Year Democratic Republican Independents
1970 David E. Satterfield, III: 73,104 J. Harvie Wilkinson, III: 35,229 Mrs. Ulrich Troubetskoy: 371
1972 David E. Satterfield, III: 102,523  
1974 David E. Satterfield, III: 64,627 Alan Robert Ogden: 7,574
1976 David E. Satterfield, III: 129,066 Alan Robert Ogden: 17,503
1978 David E. Satterfield, III: 104,550 Alan Robert Ogden: 14,453
1980 John A. Mapp: 60,962 Thomas J. Bliley, Jr.: 96,524 Howard H. Carwile: 19,549
1982 John A. Waldrop, Jr.: 63,946 Thomas J. Bliley, Jr.: 92,928  
1984 Thomas J. Bliley, Jr.: 169,987 Roger L. Coffey: 28,556
1986 Kenneth E. Powell: 32,961 Thomas J. Bliley, Jr.: 74,525 J. Stephen Bodges: 3,675
1988 Thomas J. Bliley, Jr.: 187,354
1990 James A. Starke, Jr.: 36,253 Thomas J. Bliley, Jr.: 77,125 Rose L. Simpson: 4,317
1992 Robert C. Scott: 132,432 Daniel Jenkins: 35,780  
1994 Robert C. Scott: 108,532 Thomas E. Ward: 28,080  
1996 Robert C. Scott: 118,603 Elsie Goodwyn Holland: 25,781  
1998 Robert C. Scott: 48,129 R. S. Barnett: 14,453
2000 Robert C. Scott: 137,527  
2002 Robert C. Scott: 87,521  
2004 Robert C. Scott: 159,373 Winsome E. Sears: 70,194  
2006 Robert C. Scott: 133,546  
2008 Robert C. Scott: 239,911  
2010 Robert C. Scott: 114,754 C. L. Smith, Jr.: 44,553 John D. Kelly: 1,927
2012 Robert C. Scott: 259,199 Dean J. Longo: 58,931  
2014 Robert C. Scott: 139,197  
2016 Robert C. Scott: 208,337 Martin L. Williams: 103,289  

Historical district boundaries

2003–2013

See also

Sources

  1. ^ Geography, US Census Bureau. "Congressional Districts Relationship Files (state-based)". www.census.gov. Retrieved 9 April 2018.
  2. ^ Bureau, Center for New Media & Promotion (CNMP), US Census. "My Congressional District". www.census.gov. Retrieved 9 April 2018.
  3. ^ https://www.census.gov/mycd/?st=51&cd=03
  4. ^ "Partisan Voting Index – Districts of the 115th Congress" (PDF). The Cook Political Report. April 7, 2017. Retrieved April 7, 2017.
  5. ^ "Court Ordered Redistricting". Redistricting.dls.virginia.gov. 2015-09-03. Retrieved 2017-05-06.
  6. ^ http://redistricting.dls.virginia.gov/2010/Data/Court%20Ordered%20Redistricting/2016%2001%2007%20Personnhuballah%20v%20Alcorn%20Civil%20Action%20No.%203-13cv678.pdf
  7. ^ "Supreme Court weighs legality of Virginia redistricting". The Hill. Retrieved 2017-05-06.
  8. ^ Lydia Wheeler (2016-02-01). "Supreme Court Allows Virginia Redistricting to Stand in 2016". Rollcall.com. Retrieved 2017-05-06.
  9. ^ Andrew Cain (2016-01-07). "Judges impose new Va. congressional map, redrawing 3rd, 4th Districts | Virginia Politics". Richmond Times-Dispatch. Retrieved 2017-05-06.
  10. ^ Weiner, Rachel (2014-10-07). "Court declares Virginia's congressional map unconstitutional". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2017-05-06.
  11. ^ Farnsworth, Stephen J. (2015-11-05). "The 2015 election in Virginia: A tribute to gerrymandering". The Washington Post. Retrieved 2017-05-06.
  12. ^ "2016 November General President". Retrieved November 26, 2016.
  13. ^ "2017 Governor's Election Results by Congressional District". The Virginia Public Access Project. Retrieved 2018-06-16.
  14. ^ Parsons, Stanley B, William W. Beach and Dan Hermann. United States Congressional Districts 1788-1841. (Westport: Greenwood Press, 1978) p. 29
  15. ^ Parsons. Congressional Districts. p. 28
  16. ^ Parsons. Congressional Districts. p. 71
  17. ^ Parsons. Congressional Districts. p. 70
  18. ^ Parsons. Congressional Districts. p. 129
  19. ^ Parsons. Congressional Districts. p. 128
  20. ^ "Virginia Politics: Court orders redistricting". Daily Press. Retrieved 2017-05-06.
  21. ^ By $${element.Contributor} (2016-01-07). "Judges Select New Virginia Congressional Map". Rollcall.com. Retrieved 2017-05-06.
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1989). The Historical Atlas of Political Parties in the United States Congress. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.
  • Martis, Kenneth C. (1982). The Historical Atlas of United States Congressional Districts. New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.
  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present

Coordinates: 37°12′49″N 76°57′04″W / 37.21361°N 76.95111°W / 37.21361; -76.95111