Vojin of Gacko / Vojvoda Vojin
Војвода Војин
Duke of Gacko
Reign1322-1347
PredecessorUnknown
SuccessorAltoman
Titles and styles
Lord of Gacko
Vojvoda
(Serbian Empire)
FamilyVojinović
Issue
ReligionOrthodox Christianity

Vojin of Gacko or Vojvoda Vojin (Serbian: Војвода Војин; fl. 1322–1347[a]) was powerful magnate (velikaš) and voivode (military commander, Duke), who was holding the area around Gacko, which was part of Hum, ca.1322-1347. He was in service of King Stephen Uroš III Dečanski (r. 1322–1331) and Emperor Stephen Dušan the Mighty (r. 1331-1355). He is described as one of the most important nobles (velmoža) of King Stephen,[1] and when the King and his son Dušan entered a succession war, Vojin supported the son.[2] Vojin plundered Dubrovnik in August 1325,[3] and took part in the Battle of Velbazhd (1330), and the southern military campaigns of the Serbian Empire.

Vojin is the eponymous founder of the Vojinović noble family, which eventually became one of the most powerful families as provincial lords during the fall of the Serbian Empire. His sons Altoman and Vojislav were recognized as overlords of the Hum region. His daughter Vojislava married nobleman Brajko Branivojević.[4]

Family

Notes

  1. ^ Time: He is first mentioned during the rule of Stephen Uroš III (1322–1331), and is succeeded by his son in 1347/1348. The date of his death is unknown.

References

  1. ^ Mihaljčić, p. 34
  2. ^ Grupa autora, p. 103
  3. ^ Fine, p. 264
  4. ^ Fine, p. 267

Sources

  • "Др Жељко Фајфрић: Велики жупан Никола Алтомановић". Retrieved 2011-06-16.
  • Grupa autora, „Rodoslovne tablice i grbovi srpskih dinastija i vlastele (prema tablicama Alekse Ivića)“ (drugo znatno dopunjeno i prošireno izdanje), Beograd, 1991. ISBN 86-7685-007-0
  • John V.A. Fine. (1994). The Late Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Late Twelfth Century to the Ottoman Conquest. The University of Michigan Press. ISBN 0-472-08260-4
  • George C. Soulis, The Serbs and Byzantium during the reign of Emperor Stephen Dusan (1331-1355) and his successors, Athens, 1995. ISBN 0-88402-137-8
  • Rade Mihaljčić, „Kraj srpskog carstva“, Beograd, 1975.