XII Tactical Air Command

Summary

The XII Tactical Air Command was a formation of the United States Army Air Forces. Its last assignment was with the United States Air Forces in Europe at Bad Kissingen, Germany, where it was inactivated on 10 November 1947.

XII Tactical Air Command
F-47-526thfs-Neubiberg.jpg
Active1942-1947
Country United States
Branch United States Air Force
RoleCommand of tactical units
EngagementsMediterranean Theater of Operations[1]
Insignia
Patch with unofficial XII Tactical Air Command emblem[2]XII-Tacticalairforce-patch.png

HistoryEdit

The 12th Ground Air Support Command was activated on 17 September 1942 at Birmingham Army Air Field, Alabama, where it drew its initial cadre from the 3d Ground Air Support Command.[1][3] Within a week, it had moved to Bolling Field, District of Columbia, to prepare for the invasion of North Africa and changed its name to XII Air Support Command.

The command participated in Operation Torch, the invasion of North Africa in November 1942. However, it confined itself to administering air affairs in French Morocco until January 1943. On 6 January 1943, it was attached to the Satin Task Force, primarily composed of elements of the II Corps and after 13 January was fully engaged with support of II Corps in its attack through central Tunisia. This campaign proved to be a test for United States air support doctrine and tactics. No pilots or planes trained for night reconnaissance were available, and photographic reconnaissance with Douglas A-20 Havocs was only available late in the campaign. Tying the command to a single corps also kept it from supporting other organizations participating in the campaign, such as the French XIX Corps, even when resources were available.[4]

The command served in combat in the Mediterranean and European theaters until May 1945. Afterward, remained in Europe as part of the occupation force.

Colonel Demas T. Craw was awarded the Medal of Honor for action during the invasion of Algeria-French Morocco: when the Allies landed on 8 November 1942, Col Craw volunteered to negotiate an armistice; while trying to pass through the lines near Port Lyautey, he was killed by machine-gun fire.[1]

LineageEdit

  • Constituted as the 12th Ground Air Support Command on 10 September 1942
Activated on 17 September 1942
Redesignated XII Air Support Command on 24 September 1942
Redesignated XII Tactical Air Command in April 1944
Inactivated in Germany on 10 November 1947
Disbanded on 8 October 1948[1]

AssignmentsEdit

StationsEdit

ComponentsEdit

Wings
Groups
Squadrons
Other

ReferencesEdit

NotesEdit

Explanatory notes
  1. ^ Aircraft are from the 526th Fighter Squadron at Neubiberg Air Base.
Citations
  1. ^ a b c d Maurer, Combat Units, p. 450
  2. ^ See Maurer, Combat Units, p. 450 (no approved emblem).
  3. ^ Futrell, p. 14
  4. ^ Futrell, p 23
  5. ^ a b Maurer, Combat Units, p. 450 (years only).
  6. ^ Rumley, Christopher F. (25 January 2021). "Factsheet United States Air Forces in Europe (USAF)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 23 December 2021.
  7. ^ a b Station number in Johnson, p. 42
  8. ^ "Factsheet 64 Air Division (Defense)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. 5 October 2007. Archived from the original on 14 October 2012. Retrieved 2 April 2014.
  9. ^ "Factsheet 5 Air Division". Air Force Historical Research Agency. 4 October 2007. Archived from the original on 30 October 2012. Retrieved 12 March 2014.
  10. ^ "Factsheet 47 Air Division". Air Force Historical Research Agency. 5 October 2007. Archived from the original on 17 October 2012. Retrieved 4 April 2014.
  11. ^ "Factsheet 42 Air Division". Air Force Historical Research Agency. 5 October 2007. Archived from the original on 20 October 2012. Retrieved 4 April 2014.
  12. ^ "Factsheet 57 Air Division". Air Force Historical Research Agency. 5 October 2007. Archived from the original on 13 October 2012. Retrieved 2 April 2014.
  13. ^ Robertson, Patsy (26 June 2017). "Factsheet 12 Operations Group (AETC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 28 December 2021.
  14. ^ Robertson, Patsy (27 June 2017). "Factsheet 31 Operations Group (USAFE)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 27 December 2021.
  15. ^ Dollman, TSG David (18 October 2016). "Factsheet 33 Operations Group (ACC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 29 December 2021.
  16. ^ Robertson, Patsy (5 July 2017). "Factsheet 36 Operations Group (PACAF)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 30 December 2021.
  17. ^ Robertson, Patsy E. (7 July 2017). "Factsheet 47 Operations Group (AETC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 31 December 2021.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  18. ^ Robertson, Patsy (10 July 2017). "Factsheet 50 Operations Group (AFSPC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 31 December 2021.
  19. ^ Robertson, Patsy (7 May 2013). "Factsheet 52 Operations Group (USAFE)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 1 January 2022.
  20. ^ Robertson, Patsy (29 July 2009). "Factsheet 57 Operations Group (ACC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 1 January 2022.
  21. ^ Stephens, Maj Tonia (19 June 2017). "Factsheet 53 Electronic Warfare Group (ACC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 29 December 2021.
  22. ^ Robertson, Patsy (10 July 2017). "Factsheet 69 Reconnaissance Group (ACC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 7 January 2022.
  23. ^ Stevens, Maj Sonia (11 July 2017). "Factsheet 53 Test and Evaluation Group (ACC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 7 January 2022.
  24. ^ Forte, Maria (4 April 2018). "Factsheet 86 Operations Group (USAFE)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 10 January 2022.
  25. ^ Haulman, Daniel (1 November 2016). "Factsheet 340 Flying Training Group (AFRC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 12 January 2022.
  26. ^ Robertson, Patsy (5 April 2012). "Factsheet 354 Operations Group (PACAF)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 13 January 2022.
  27. ^ Robertson, Patsy (10 July 2017). "Factsheet 363 Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Group (ACC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 13 January 2022.
  28. ^ Dollman, TSG David. (18 October 2016). "Factsheet 366 Operations Group (ACC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 13 January 2022.
  29. ^ Dollman, TSG David (16 June 2017). "Factsheet 2 Air Support Operations Squadron (USAFE)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 17 July 2018.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  30. ^ Dollman, TSG David (5 August 2016). "Factsheet 4 Air Support Operations Group (USAFE)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 14 January 2022.
  31. ^ Dollman, TSG David (16 May 2019). "Factsheet 11 Air Support Operations Squadron (ACC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 15 January 2022.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: url-status (link)
  32. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, pp. 78-79
  33. ^ Dollman, TSG Davis (31 August 2012). "Factsheet 18 Air Support Operations Group (ACC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 14 January 2022.
  34. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 165
  35. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 207
  36. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 266
  37. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 329
  38. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, pp. 340-341
  39. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 350
  40. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 352
  41. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 362
  42. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 364
  43. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 451
  44. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 508
  45. ^ Maurer, Combat Squadrons, p. 511
  46. ^ Lacomia, John M. (29 April 2018). "Factsheet 521 Air Mobility Operations Wing (AMC)". Air Force Historical Research Agency. Retrieved 16 January 2022.

BibliographyEdit

  This article incorporates public domain material from the Air Force Historical Research Agency website http://www.afhra.af.mil/.

  • Futrell, Robert F. (September 1956). "Command of Observation Aviation: A Study in Control of Tactical Airpower, USAF Historical Study No. 24" (PDF). Research Studies Institute, USAF Historical Division, Air University. Retrieved 23 January 2022.
  • Johnson, 1st Lt. David C. (1988). U.S. Army Air Forces Continental Airfields (ETO) D-Day to V-E Day (PDF). Maxwell AFB, AL: Research Division, USAF Historical Research Center. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 September 2015. Retrieved 26 June 2017.
  • Maurer, Maurer, ed. (1983) [1961]. Air Force Combat Units of World War II (PDF) (reprint ed.). Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. ISBN 0-912799-02-1. LCCN 61060979. Retrieved 17 December 2016.
  • Maurer, Maurer, ed. (1982) [1969]. Combat Squadrons of the Air Force, World War II (PDF) (reprint ed.). Washington, DC: Office of Air Force History. ISBN 0-405-12194-6. LCCN 70605402. OCLC 72556. Retrieved 17 December 2016.