Yoshito Sengoku

Summary

Yoshito Sengoku (仙谷 由人, Sengoku Yoshito, born January 15, 1946 – October 11, 2018) was a Japanese politician serving in the House of Representatives in the Diet (national legislature) as a member of the Democratic Party of Japan.

Yoshito Sengoku
仙谷 由人
Yoshito Sengoku - World Economic Forum Annual Meeting Davos 2010.jpg
Sengoku at the 2010 World Economic Forum
Minister of Justice
In office
22 November 2010 – 14 January 2011
Prime MinisterNaoto Kan
Preceded byMinoru Yanagida
Succeeded bySatsuki Eda
Minister of State for the Abduction Issue
In office
22 November 2010 – 14 January 2011
Prime MinisterNaoto Kan
Preceded byMinoru Yanagida
Succeeded byKansei Nakano
Chief Cabinet Secretary
In office
8 June 2010 – 14 January 2011
Prime MinisterNaoto Kan
Preceded byHirofumi Hirano
Succeeded byYukio Edano
Minister of State for National Strategy
In office
7 January 2010 – 8 June 2010
Prime MinisterYukio Hatoyama
Preceded byNaoto Kan
Succeeded bySatoshi Arai
Minister of State for Civil Service Reform
In office
16 September 2009 – 8 June 2010
Prime MinisterYukio Hatoyama
Preceded byPosition established
Succeeded byKōichirō Genba
Minister of State for Government Revitalisation
In office
16 September 2009 – 10 February 2010
Prime MinisterYukio Hatoyama
Preceded byPosition established
Succeeded byYukio Edano
Member of the Japanese House of Representatives
In office
18 February 1990 – 4 December 2012
Preceded byConstituency established
Succeeded byMamoru Fukuyama
ConstituencyTokushima's 1st district (1996–2012, 1990–1993)
Personal details
Born(1946-01-15)15 January 1946
Tokushima, Japan
Died11 October 2018(2018-10-11) (aged 72)
Tokyo, Japan
Political partyDemocratic Party (1996–present)
Other political
affiliations
Social Democratic Party (Before 1996)
Alma materUniversity of Tokyo (Incomplete)
WebsiteOfficial website

OverviewsEdit

 
with Lee Kuan Yew (on May, 2012)
 
with Goh Chok Tong (on May, 2012)

He was born in Tokushima, Tokushima prefecture. While studying in the University of Tokyo, he passed the bar exam and therefore dropped out of the university. He was elected for the first time in 1990 as a member of the Japan Socialist Party.

Viewed as a close ally of Prime Minister Naoto Kan, the opposition Liberal Democratic Party has labeled Sengoku as the "second" Prime Minister of the Kan cabinet. Sengoku denies that he wields any extraordinary influence in the government and praised Kan as a "strong leader".[1]

In January 2011, he was ousted from his position as a top cabinet member due to swelling pressure from the opposition, namely the Liberal Democratic Party and Komeito Party, to execute cabinet reform. Sengoku was replaced by Yukio Edano, who was expected to yield much influence over Kan as a protégé of Sengoku.

In March 2011, Prime Minister Naoto Kan appointed Sengoku as Deputy Chief Cabinet Secretary.[2]

He lost his seat in the December 16, 2012 general election.[3]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Sengoku's growing influence causes a stir". The Japan Times. 2010-10-23. Retrieved 2010-10-23.
  2. ^ "Kan brings Sengoku back into gov't to deal with nuke crisis". Kyodo News English. March 17, 2011. Archived from the original on March 20, 2011. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  3. ^ Japan Times Nothing left for the election-gutted DPJ to do but rebuild December 18, 2012

External linksEdit

  • Official website (in Japanese)
House of Representatives of Japan
Preceded by
Masaharu Gotōda
Takeo Miki
Kazuyoshi Endō
Motoharu Morishita
Hironori Inoue
Representative for Tokushima's At-large district (multi-member)
1990–1993
Served alongside: Masaharu Gotōda, Shunichi Yamaguchi, Kazuyoshi Endō, Hironori Inoue
Succeeded by
New constituency Representative for Tokushima's 1st district
1990-1993, 1996–2012
Succeeded by
Mamoru Fukuyama
Party political offices
Preceded by Chairperson of the Policy Affairs Research Council of the Democratic Party
2004–2005
Succeeded by
Political offices
New office Minister of State for Civil Service Reform
2009–2010
Succeeded by
Minister of State for Government Revitalization
2009–2010
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister of State for National Strategy
2010
Succeeded by
Preceded by Chief Cabinet Secretary
2010–2011
Succeeded by
Preceded by Minister of Justice
2010–2011
Succeeded by
Minister of State for the Abduction Issue
2010–2011
Succeeded by