United States House of Representatives election in Pennsylvania, 1792

← 1791 October 9, 1792 1794 →

All 13[1] Pennsylvania seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Anti-Administration Pro-Administration
Last election 4 4
Seats won 8 5
Seat change Increase 4 Increase 1
Popular vote 246,466 157,338
Percentage 61.0% 39.0%

An election to the United States House of Representatives in Pennsylvania for the 3rd Congress were held on October 9, 1792.

Background

Eight representatives, 4 Pro-Administration and 4 Anti-Administration, had been elected in the previous election. In the previous election, Pennsylvania had been divided into 8 districts. Five additional seats had been apportioned to Pennsylvania after the 1790 Census. All 13 seats were elected at-large, an attempt by the Pro-Administration-majority legislature of Pennsylvania to prevent the election of Anti-Administration Representatives. This backfired and an 8-5 Anti-Administration majority was elected.

Election results

All 8 incumbents ran for re-election. Seven were re-elected. There were a total of 20 candidates running for the 13 seats, 11 Anti-Administration and 9 Pro-Administration (two of the Anti-Administration candidates ran on a dual ticket but are listed here as Anti-Administration)

1792 United States House election results
Anti-Administration Pro-Administration
William Findley[2] (I) 33,158 8.21% John W. Kittera (I) 29,835 7.39%
Frederick Muhlenberg[2] (I) 32,341 8.01% Thomas Hartley (I) 28,493 7.06%
Daniel Hiester (I) 32,147 7.96% Thomas Fitzsimmons (I) 17,997 4.46%
William Irvine 30,968 7.67% James Armstrong 17,312 4.29%
Peter Muhlenberg 21,784 5.40% Thomas Scott 16,657 4.13%
Andrew Gregg (I) 17,372 4.30% Samuel Sitgreaves 15,588 3.86%
William Montgomery 17,019 4.22% William Bingham 14,482 3.59%
John Smilie 16,754 4.15% Henry Wynkoop 14,348 3.55%
Jonathan D. Sergeant 15,096 3.74% Israel Jacobs (I) 2,626 0.65%
John Barclay 14,953 3.70%
Charles Thomson 14,874 3.68%

This was the last year in which Pennsylvania would elect all of its representatives at-large. In the following election, Pennsylvania would be divided up into 12 districts (including one plural district). At various times between 1873 and 1945, between 1 and 4 of Pennsylvania's Representatives were elected at-large, with the rest being elected from single-member districts.

References

  • Electoral data and information on districts are from the Wilkes University Elections Statistics Project
  1. ^ 5 new seats gained in reapportionment
  2. ^ a b Also on Pro-Administration ticket