(145452) 2005 RN43

Summary

(145452) 2005 RN43
2005-rn43 hst.jpg
Hubble Space Telescope image of 2005 RN43, taken on April 2010
Discovery[1]
Discovered byA. C. Becker
A. W. Puckett
J. M. Kubica
Discovery siteAPO
Discovery date10 September 2005
Designations
(145452) 2005 RN43
TNO
Cubewano[2][3]
Extended (DES)[4]
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3
Observation arc22376 days (61.26 yr)
Earliest precovery date2 June 1954
Aphelion42.146 AU (6.3050 Tm)
Perihelion40.571 AU (6.0693 Tm)
41.359 AU (6.1872 Tm)
Eccentricity0.019047
265.99 yr (97151.5 d)
0.0037°/d
338.28°
0° 0m 13.34s / day
Inclination19.313°
186.93°
≈ 15 June 2029[5]
±9 days
174.88°
Earth MOID39.5672 AU (5.91917 Tm)
Jupiter MOID35.6155 AU (5.32800 Tm)
TJupiter5.446
Physical characteristics
Dimensions679+55
−73
 km
[6]
6.95 h (0.290 d)
5.62 h[2]
0.107+0.029
−0.018
[6]
IR–RR (red)[6]
B–V=0.95±0.02[7]
V–R=0.59±0.01[7]
V–I=1.08±0.02[7]
20.1[8]
3.89±0.05[6]
3.9[2]

(145452) 2005 RN43, also written as (145452) 2005 RN43, is a classical Kuiper belt object. It has an estimated diameter of 679+55
−73
 km
.[6] It was discovered by Andrew Becker, Andrew Puckett and Jeremy Kubica on 10 September 2005 at Apache Point Observatory in Sunspot, New Mexico. Brown estimates that it is possibly a dwarf planet.[9][10]

Classification

The Minor Planet Center (MPC) classifies it as a cubewano.[3] But since this object has an inclination of 19.3°, the Deep Ecliptic Survey (DES) classifies it as scattered-extended.[4]

It has been observed 119 times over thirteen oppositions, with precovery images back to 1954.[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ "List Of Transneptunian Objects". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 22 August 2016.
  2. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 145452 (2005 RN43)" (2015-08-13 last obs). Retrieved 11 April 2016.
  3. ^ a b "MPEC 2009-R09 :Distant Minor Planets (2009 September 16.0 TT)". IAU Minor Planet Center. 2009-09-04. Retrieved 2010-01-08.
  4. ^ a b Marc W. Buie. "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 145452" (2008-08-09 using 220 of 221 observations). SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2009-10-04.
  5. ^ JPL Horizons Observer Location: @sun (Perihelion occurs when deldot changes from negative to positive. Uncertainty in time of perihelion is 3-sigma.)
  6. ^ a b c d e Vilenius, E.; Kiss, C.; Mommert, M.; et al. (2012). ""TNOs are Cool": A survey of the trans-Neptunian region VI. Herschel/PACS observations and thermal modeling of 19 classical Kuiper belt objects". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 541: A94. arXiv:1204.0697. Bibcode:2012A&A...541A..94V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201118743. S2CID 54222700.
  7. ^ a b c Belskaya, Irina N.; Barucci, Maria A.; Fulchignoni, Marcello; Lazzarin, M. (April 2015). "Updated taxonomy of trans-neptunian objects and centaurs: Influence of albedo". Icarus. 250: 482–491. Bibcode:2015Icar..250..482B. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2014.12.004.
  8. ^ "AstDys (145452) 2005RN43 Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 2009-12-07.
  9. ^ Michael E. Brown. "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system? (updates daily)". California Institute of Technology. Archived from the original on 2011-10-18. Retrieved 2011-08-25.
  10. ^ Tancredi, Gonzalo (2009), "Physical and dynamical characteristics of icy "dwarf planets" (plutoids)", Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union, 5: 173–185, Bibcode:2010IAUS..263..173T, doi:10.1017/S1743921310001717

External links

  • (145452) 2005 RN43 at the JPL Small-Body Database
    • Close approach · Discovery · Ephemeris · Orbit diagram · Orbital elements · Physical parameters