2014 OO6

Summary

2014 OO6
Discovery[1]
Discovered byPan-STARRS (F51)
Discovery date27 July 2014
Designations
2014 OO6
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 4
Observation arc154 days
Aphelion3.6991 AU (553.38 Gm) (Q)
Perihelion0.70742 AU (105.829 Gm) (q)
2.2032 AU (329.59 Gm) (a)
Eccentricity0.67892 (e)
3.27 yr (1194.5 d)
140.83° (M)
0° 18m 4.968s / day (n)
Inclination1.3817° (i)
111.17° (Ω)
287.34° (ω)
Earth MOID0.000161353 AU (24,138.1 km)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions
  • ~75 meters[3]
  • 60–140 meters[4]
23.1[2]

2014 OO6 (also written 2014 OO6) is an Apollo near-Earth asteroid discovered in 2014 and was the most dangerous one discovered in 2014 that remained on the Sentry Risk Table as of early December 2014.[3] The asteroid is estimated to be roughly 75 meters (246 ft) in diameter and had a 1 in 83,000 chance of impacting Earth on 11 January 2051.[3] However, the nominal best-fit orbit shows that 2014 OO6 will be 1.5 AU (220,000,000 km; 140,000,000 mi) from Earth on 11 January 2051.[5]

It was discovered on 27 July 2014 by Pan-STARRS at an apparent magnitude of 20 using a 1.8-meter (71 in) Ritchey–Chrétien telescope.[1] On 18 August 2014 the asteroid passed 0.02975 AU (4,451,000 km; 2,765,000 mi) from Earth.[6] By 23 August 2014, the asteroid had dimmed to below magnitude 25.[7] As of early December 2014, the asteroid had an observation arc of 24 days with an uncertainty parameter of 7.[2] 2014 OO6 was recovered by Cerro Paranal Observatory on 23 and 26 December 2014 at magnitude 25 which extended the observation arc from 24 days to 154 days.[8] The orbital refinement removed the impact risk for 11 January 2051.[3]

With an absolute magnitude of 23.1,[2] the asteroid is about 60–140 meters in diameter.[4]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "MPEC 2014-O56 : 2014 OO6". IAU Minor Planet Center. 28 July 2014. Retrieved 12 December 2014. (K14O06O)
  2. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2014 OO6)" (last observation: 18 August 2014; arc: 24 days). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Archived from the original on 12 December 2014. Retrieved 4 April 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d "Earth Impact Risk Summary: 2014 OO6". Wayback Machine: NASA/JPL Near-Earth Object Program Office. 13 December 2014. Archived from the original on 13 December 2014. Retrieved 12 December 2014.
  4. ^ a b "Absolute Magnitude (H)". NASA/JPL. Archived from the original on 2 March 2001. Retrieved 12 December 2014.
  5. ^ "2014OO6 Ephemerides for 1 January 2051 through 18 January 2051". NEODyS (Near Earth Objects – Dynamic Site). Archived from the original on 12 December 2014. Retrieved 12 December 2014.
  6. ^ "JPL Close-Approach Data: (2014 OO6)" (last observation: 18 August 2014; arc: 24 days). Retrieved 12 December 2014.
  7. ^ "2014OO6 Ephemerides for 11 July 2014 through 28 August 2014". NEODyS (Near Earth Objects – Dynamic Site). Retrieved 12 December 2014.
  8. ^ "2014 OO6 Orbit". IAU Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 29 December 2014.

External links

  • 2014 OO6 at NeoDyS-2, Near Earth Objects—Dynamic Site
    • Ephemeris · Obs prediction · Orbital info · MOID · Proper elements · Obs info · Close · Physical info · NEOCC
  • 2014 OO6 at ESA–space situational awareness
    • Ephemerides · Observations · Orbit · Physical Properties · Summary
  • 2014 OO6 at the JPL Small-Body Database
    • Close approach · Discovery · Ephemeris · Orbit diagram · Orbital elements · Physical parameters