2212 Hephaistos

Summary

2212 Hephaistos (1978 SB) is an Apollo asteroid and a NEO discovered on 27 September 1978 by L. I. Chernykh at the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory. It is named after the Greek god Hephaestus. It is the largest member of the Hephaistos asteroid group. It makes close approaches to all of the inner planets and will pass 0.048 AU (7.2 million km) from Mercury on 2032-Sep-16.[1]

Hephaistos
Discovery
Discovered byLyudmila Chernykh
Discovery siteCrimean Astrophysical Observatory
Discovery date27 September 1978
Designations
(2212) Hephaistos
Pronunciation/hɛˈfstɒs/
Named after
Hephaestus
1978 SB
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc41.13 yr (15022 days)
Aphelion3.9674 AU (593.51 Gm)
Perihelion0.35068 AU (52.461 Gm)
2.1590 AU (322.98 Gm)
Eccentricity0.83757
3.17 yr (1158.8 d)
272.08°
0° 18m 38.412s / day
Inclination11.558°
27.569°
2023-Feb-26
2019-Dec-25 (previous)
209.33°
Earth MOID0.11610 AU (17.368 Gm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions~6 km[1]
2.85 km
20 h (0.83 d)[1]
SG[1]
13.87[1]

Other potential members of the Hephaistos group include (85182) 1991 AQ, 4486 Mithra, and D/1766 G1 (Helfenzrieder).[2]

References

edit
  1. ^ a b c d e f "2212 Hephaistos (1978 SB)". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 15 April 2016.
  2. ^ Steel, D.; Asher, D. (1994). "P/Helfenzrieder (1766 II) and the Hephaistos group of Earth-crossing asteroids". The Observatory. 114: 223–226. Bibcode:1994Obs...114..223S.
edit
  • 2212 Hephaistos at NeoDyS-2, Near Earth Objects—Dynamic Site
    • Ephemerides · Observation prediction · Orbital info · MOID · Proper elements · Observational info · Close approaches · Physical info · Orbit animation
  • 2212 Hephaistos at ESA–space situational awareness
    • Ephemerides · Observations · Orbit · Physical properties · Summary
  • 2212 Hephaistos at the JPL Small-Body Database  
    • Close approach · Discovery · Ephemeris · Orbit diagram · Orbital elements · Physical parameters