70 (number)

Summary

70 (seventy) is the natural number following 69 and preceding 71.

← 69 70 71 →
Cardinalseventy
Ordinal70th
(seventieth)
Factorization2 × 5 × 7
Divisors1, 2, 5, 7, 10, 14, 35, 70
Greek numeralΟ´
Roman numeralLXX
Binary10001102
Ternary21213
Octal1068
Duodecimal5A12
Hexadecimal4616
Hebrewע
Lao

In mathematicsEdit

70 is:

The sum of the first 24 squares starting from 1 is 702 = 4900, i.e. a square pyramidal number. This is the only non trivial solution to the cannonball problem and relates 70 to the Leech lattice and thus string theory.

In scienceEdit

AstronomyEdit

In religionEdit

  • In Jewish tradition:
    • Seventy souls went down to Egypt to begin the Hebrews' Egyptian exile (Genesis 46:27).
    • There is a core of 70 nations and 70 world languages, paralleling the 70 names in the Table of Nations.
    • There were 70 men in the Great Sanhedrin, the Supreme Court of ancient Israel. (Sanhedrin 1:4.)
    • According to the Jewish Aggada, there are 70 perspectives ("faces") to the Torah (Numbers Rabbah 13:15).
    • Seventy elders were assembled by Moses on God's command in the desert (Numbers 11:16–30).
    • Psalm 90:10 allots three score and ten (70 years) for a man's life, and the Mishnah attributes that age to "strength" (Avot 5:32), as one who survives that age is described by the verse as "the strong".
    • Ptolemy II Philadelphus ordered 72 Jewish elders to translate the Torah into Greek; the result was the Septuagint (from the Latin for "seventy"). The Roman numeral seventy, LXX, is the scholarly symbol for the Septuagint.
  • In Christianity:
    • In Matthew 18:21–22, Jesus tells Peter to forgive people seventy times seven times.
    • In Luke 10:1–24, Jesus appoints Seventy Disciples and sends them out in pairs to preach the Gospel.
  • Seventy is a priesthood office in the Latter Day Saint religion.
  • In Islamic history and in Islamic interpretation the number 70 or 72 is most often and generally hyperbole for an infinite amount:

In lawEdit

In sportsEdit

In other fieldsEdit

Number nameEdit

Several languages, especially ones with vigesimal number systems, do not have a specific word for 70: for example, French soixante-dix "sixty-ten"; Danish halvfjerds, short for halvfjerdsindstyve "three and a half score". (For French, this is true only in France; other French-speaking regions such as Belgium, Switzerland, Aosta Valley and Jersey use septante.[8])

NotesEdit

  1. ^ "Sloane's A007304 : Sphenic numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-29.
  2. ^ "Sloane's A000326 : Pentagonal numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-29.
  3. ^ "Sloane's A051865 : 13-gonal (or tridecagonal) numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-29.
  4. ^ "Sloane's A000332 : Binomial coefficient binomial(n,4) = n*(n-1)*(n-2)*(n-3)/24". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-29.
  5. ^ "Sloane's A006037 : Weird numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-29.
  6. ^ "Sloane's A059756 : Erdős-Woods numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-29.
  7. ^ The Official Highway Code, pub. Department for Transport (Revised 2007 Edition). ISBN 978-0-11-552814-9. A white circular sign with a black diagonal stripe indicates that the national speed limit applies. This depends on the vehicle type and grade of road. The table on p. 40 shows the highest speed permitted to be 70 mph, for normally-laden cars and motorcycles on dual-carriageways and motorways.
  8. ^ Peter Higgins, Number Story. London: Copernicus Books (2008): 19. "Belgian French speakers however grew tired of this and introduced the new names septante, octante, nonante etc. for these numbers".

External linksEdit

  • On some Philological Peculiarities in the English Authorized Version of the Bible. By Thomas Watts, Esq.