N-II (rocket)

Summary

N-II
N-II.svg
The N-II rocket
FunctionCarrier rocket
ManufacturerMcDonnell Douglas (design)
Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (production)
Country of originUnited States (design)
Japan (production)
Size
Height35 metres (115 ft)
Diameter2.44 metres (8.0 ft)
Mass132,690 kilograms (292,530 lb)
Stages2 or 3
Capacity
Payload to LEO
Mass2,000 kilograms (4,400 lb)
Payload to GTO
Mass730 kilograms (1,610 lb)
Associated rockets
FamilyDelta
Launch history
StatusRetired
Launch sitesLA-N, Tanegashima
Total launches8
Success(es)8
First flight11 February 1981
Last flight19 February 1987
Boosters – Castor 2
No. boosters9
Engines1 TX-354-3
Thrust258.9 kilonewtons (58,200 lbf)
Specific impulse262 sec
Burn time37 seconds
FuelSolid
First stage – Thor-ELT
Engines1 MB-3-3
Thrust866.7 kilonewtons (194,800 lbf)
Specific impulse290 sec
Burn time270 seconds
FuelRP-1/LOX
Second stage – Delta-F
Engines1 AJ-10-118F
Thrust41.3 kilonewtons (9,300 lbf)
Specific impulse280 sec
Burn time335 seconds
FuelHNO3/UDMH
Third stage (optional) – Star-37E
Engines1 solid
Thrust68 kilonewtons (15,000 lbf)
Specific impulse284 sec
Burn time42 seconds
FuelSolid
Third stage (alternative, optional) – Burner-2
Engines1 solid
Thrust43.6 kilonewtons (9,800 lbf)
Specific impulse285 sec
Burn time42 seconds
FuelSolid

The N-II or N-2 was a derivative of the American Delta rocket, produced under licence in Japan. It replaced the N-I-rocket in Japanese use. It used a Thor-ELT first stage, a Delta-F second stage, nine Castor SRMs, and on most flights either a Star-37E or Burner-2 upper stage, identical to the US Delta 0100 series configurations. Eight were launched between 1981 and 1987, before it was replaced by the H-I, which featured Japanese-produced upper stages. All eight launches were successful.

Launch history

Flight No. Date / time (UTC) Rocket,
Configuration
Launch site Payload Payload mass Orbit Customer Launch
outcome
7(F) 11 February 1981
08:30
Tanegashima ETS-4 (Kiku-3)[1] MEO Success
8(F) 10 August 1981
20:03
Tanegashima GMS-2 (Himawari-2)[2] GTO Success
10(F) 4 February 1983
08:37
Tanegashima CS-2A (Sakura-2A)[3] GTO Success
11(F) 5 August 1983
20:29
Tanegashima CS-2B (Sakura-2B)[3] GTO Success
12(F) 23 January 1984
07:58
Tanegashima BS-2A (Yuri-2A)[4] GTO Success
13(F) 2 August 1984
20:30
Tanegashima GMS-3 (Himawari-3)[2] GTO Success
14(F) 12 February 1986
07:55
Tanegashima BS-2B (Yuri-2B)[4] GTO Success
16(F) 19 February 1987
01:23
Tanegashima MOS-1 (Momo-1)[5] LEO Success

See also

References

  1. ^ "JAXA | Engineering Test Satellite IV "KIKU-3" (ETS-IV)". JAXA | Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. Retrieved 2020-03-16.
  2. ^ a b "JAXA | Geostationary Meteorological Satellite "Himawari" (GMS)". JAXA | Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. Retrieved 2020-03-16.
  3. ^ a b "JAXA | Communication Satellite "Sakura" (CS)". JAXA | Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. Retrieved 2020-03-16.
  4. ^ a b "JAXA | Broadcasting Satellite "Yuri" (BS)". JAXA | Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. Retrieved 2020-03-16.
  5. ^ "JAXA | Marine Observation Satellite-1 "Momo-1" (MOS-1)". JAXA | Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. Retrieved 2020-03-16.
  • Wade, Mark. "Delta". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Archived from the original on 2013-05-22. Retrieved 2008-08-31.
  • McDowell, Jonathan. "Thor". Orbital and Suborbital Launch Database. Jonathan's Space Report. Retrieved 2008-08-31.
  • Krebs, Gunter. "N-2". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 2008-08-31.