Hall County, Georgia

Summary

Hall County is a county located in the north central portion of the U.S. state of Georgia. As of the 2020 census, the population was 203,136,[1] up from 179,684 at the 2010 census.[2] The county seat is Gainesville.[3] The entirety of Hall County comprises the Gainesville, Georgia, Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is also part of the Atlanta-Athens-Clarke County-Sandy Springs, Combined Statistical Area.

Hall County
Hall County courthouse in Gainesville
Hall County courthouse in Gainesville
Map of Georgia highlighting Hall County
Location within the U.S. state of Georgia
Map of the United States highlighting Georgia
Georgia's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 34°19′N 83°49′W / 34.32°N 83.82°W / 34.32; -83.82
Country United States
State Georgia
FoundedDecember 15, 1818; 203 years ago (1818-12-15)
Named forLyman Hall
SeatGainesville
Largest cityGainesville
Area
 • Total429 sq mi (1,110 km2)
 • Land393 sq mi (1,020 km2)
 • Water37 sq mi (100 km2)  8.5%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total203,136
 • Density457/sq mi (176/km2)
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
Congressional district9th
Websitewww.hallcounty.org

HistoryEdit

Hall County was created on December 15, 1818, from Cherokee lands ceded by the Treaty of Cherokee Agency (1817) and Treaty of Washington (1819).[4]

The county is named for Lyman Hall,[5] a signer of the Declaration of Independence and governor of Georgia as both colony and state.

GeographyEdit

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 429 square miles (1,110 km2), of which 393 square miles (1,020 km2) is land and 37 square miles (96 km2) (8.5%) is water.[6] The county is located in the upper Piedmont region of the state in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains to the north.

Slightly more than half of Hall County, the eastern portion of the county, is located in the Upper Oconee River sub-basin of the Altamaha River basin, while the western half of the county is located in the Upper Chattahoochee River sub-basin of the ACF River Basin (Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River Basin).[7]

The Chattahoochee River gathers strength in Hall County, as immortalized in Sidney Lanier's poem, "Song of the Chattahoochee":

OUT of the hills of Habersham,
Down the valleys of Hall,
I hurry amain to reach the plain,
Run the rapid and leap the fall,
Split at the rock and together again,

Adjacent countiesEdit

AttractionsEdit

TransportationEdit

Major highwaysEdit

Mass transitEdit

Pedestrians and cyclingEdit

  • Chicopee Woods Bike Trail
  • Wilshire Trail

DemographicsEdit

Historical population
Census Pop.
18205,086
183011,748131.0%
18407,875−33.0%
18508,71310.6%
18609,3667.5%
18709,6072.6%
188015,29859.2%
189018,04718.0%
190020,75215.0%
191025,73024.0%
192026,8224.2%
193030,31313.0%
194034,82214.9%
195040,11315.2%
196049,73924.0%
197059,40519.4%
198075,64927.3%
199095,42826.1%
2000139,27745.9%
2010179,68429.0%
2020203,13613.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[11]
1790–1960[12] 1900–1990[13]
1990–2000[14] 2010–2019[2] 2020[1]

Hall County remains extremely rural and many of its residents reside in unincorporated areas, accounting for more than half of the county's population.

2000 censusEdit

At the 2000 census,[15] 139,277 people, 80,381 households and 80,009 families resided in the county. The population density was 354 per square mile (137/km2). There were 51,046 housing units at an average density of 130 per square mile (50/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 80.75% White, 7.27% Black or African American, 0.34% Native American, 1.35% Asian, 0.17% Pacific Islander, 8.75% from other races, and 1.36% from two or more races. About 19.56% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Of the 80,381 households, 37.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.20% were married couples living together, 10.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 24.00% were not families. About 19.20% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.89 and the average family size was 3.26.

Age distribution was 26.90% under the age of 18, 10.80% from 18 to 24, 32.30% from 25 to 44, 20.60% from 45 to 64, and 9.40% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females, there were 103.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.90 males.

The median household income was $44,908, and the median family income was $50,100. Males had a median income of $31,769 versus $24,550 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,690. About 8.50% of families and 12.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.20% of those under age 18 and 14.70% of those age 65 or over.

2010 censusEdit

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 179,684 people, 60,691 households, and 45,275 families residing in the county.[16] The population density was 457.5 inhabitants per square mile (176.6/km2). There were 68,825 housing units at an average density of 175.2 per square mile (67.6/km2).[17] The racial makeup of the county was 74.1% white, 7.4% black or African American, 1.8% Asian, 0.5% American Indian, 0.1% Pacific islander, 13.9% from other races, and 2.2% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 26.1% of the population.[16] In terms of ancestry, 16.8% were American, 10.6% were Irish, 9.3% were English, and 8.9% were German.[18]

Of the 60,691 households, 40.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.6% were married couples living together, 12.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 25.4% were non-families, and 20.3% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.91 and the average family size was 3.35. The median age was 34.5 years.[16]

The median income for a household in the county was $50,876 and the median income for a family was $57,774. Males had a median income of $38,671 versus $31,378 for females. The per capita income for the county was $23,675. About 11.3% of families and 14.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.3% of those under age 18 and 11.6% of those age 65 or over.[19]

2020 censusEdit

Hall County racial composition[20]
Race Num. Perc.
White (non-Hispanic) 120,418 59.28%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 14,256 7.02%
Native American 341 0.17%
Asian 4,198 2.07%
Pacific Islander 85 0.04%
Other/mixed 6,828 3.36%
Hispanic or Latino 57,010 28.06%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 203,136 people, 65,625 households, and 48,776 families residing in the county.

EducationEdit

Colleges and universitiesEdit

High schoolsEdit

Middle schoolsEdit

  • Academies of Discovery at South Hall
  • Alternative Learning Center/International Center
  • C. W. Davis Middle School
  • Cherokee Bluff Middle School
  • Chestatee Middle School
  • East Hall Middle School
  • Gainesville Middle School
  • Lanier Career Academy
  • North Georgia Christian School[21]
  • North Hall Middle School
  • West Hall Middle School
  • World Language Academy Middle School (Shares building with South Hall)

CommunitiesEdit

CitiesEdit

TownsEdit

Unincorporated communitiesEdit

PoliticsEdit

Hall County had voting patterns similar to the Solid South, with the exception of narrowly supporting Herbert Hoover against Catholic Democrat Al Smith in 1928. Since then, it has been won by the GOP by landslide margins, in stark contrast to nearby inner suburban counties of Atlanta, with the exception of segregationist George Wallace in 1968 and favorite son Jimmy Carter in both of his campaigns.

United States presidential election results for Hall County, Georgia[22][23]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 64,183 70.89% 25,033 27.65% 1,321 1.46%
2016 51,733 72.72% 16,180 22.74% 3,229 4.54%
2012 47,481 77.19% 12,999 21.13% 1,032 1.68%
2008 44,962 74.77% 14,457 24.04% 711 1.18%
2004 38,883 78.09% 10,514 21.12% 395 0.79%
2000 26,841 70.36% 10,259 26.89% 1,050 2.75%
1996 19,280 59.84% 10,362 32.16% 2577 8.00%
1992 16,108 49.67% 11,214 34.58% 5111 15.76%
1988 17,415 68.71% 7,782 30.71% 147 0.58%
1984 15,076 67.01% 7,421 32.99% 0 0.00%
1980 7,760 37.81% 12,124 59.08% 637 3.10%
1976 5,093 28.46% 12,804 71.54% 0 0.00%
1972 10,686 81.41% 2,440 18.59% 0 0.00%
1968 4,923 36.08% 3,174 23.26% 5,546 40.65%
1964 4,296 34.90% 8,003 65.01% 11 0.09%
1960 2,903 31.53% 6,303 68.47% 0 0.00%
1956 2,752 31.48% 5,989 68.52% 0 0.00%
1952 1,845 23.16% 6,121 76.84% 0 0.00%
1948 606 14.57% 3,093 74.37% 460 11.06%
1944 796 20.61% 3,066 79.37% 1 0.03%
1940 513 14.73% 2,943 84.52% 26 0.75%
1936 444 13.96% 2,731 85.85% 6 0.19%
1932 120 4.32% 2,649 95.29% 11 0.40%
1928 1,573 50.81% 1,523 49.19% 0 0.00%
1924 290 15.57% 1,398 75.04% 175 9.39%
1920 852 36.61% 1,475 63.39% 0 0.00%
1916 367 16.91% 1,662 76.59% 141 6.50%
1912 275 17.90% 1,145 74.54% 116 7.55%
1908 634 42.81% 707 47.74% 140 9.45%
1904 190 9.61% 1,135 57.41% 652 32.98%
1900 262 21.72% 880 72.97% 64 5.31%
1896 582 31.49% 1,134 61.36% 132 7.14%
1892 237 9.51% 1,526 61.26% 728 29.23%
1888 274 11.02% 2,170 87.29% 42 1.69%
1884 259 17.26% 1,242 82.74% 0 0.00%
1880 269 13.36% 1,745 86.64% 0 0.00%


See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "QuickFacts - Hall County, Georgia". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 4, 2022.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 3, 2011. Retrieved February 16, 2014.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. ^ Krakow, Kenneth K. (1975). Georgia Place-Names: Their History and Origins (PDF). Macon, GA: Winship Press. p. 101. ISBN 0-915430-00-2.
  5. ^ Gannett, Henry (1905). The Origin of Certain Place Names in the United States. Govt. Print. Off. pp. 147.
  6. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  7. ^ "Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission Interactive Mapping Experience". Georgia Soil and Water Conservation Commission. Retrieved November 18, 2015.
  8. ^ Gainesville Theatre Alliance
  9. ^ "Hall Area Transit Bus Services | City of Gainesville, Georgia". www.gainesville.org. Retrieved August 7, 2018.
  10. ^ "History | City of Gainesville, Georgia". www.gainesville.org. Retrieved August 7, 2018.
  11. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 23, 2014.
  12. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved June 23, 2014.
  13. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 23, 2014.
  14. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved June 23, 2014.
  15. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  16. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 29, 2015.
  17. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 – County". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 29, 2015.
  18. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 29, 2015.
  19. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006–2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved December 29, 2015.
  20. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 13, 2021.
  21. ^ a b North Georgia Christian School
  22. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 20, 2018.
  23. ^ http://geoelections.free.fr/. Retrieved January 13, 2021. {{cite web}}: Missing or empty |title= (help)

External linksEdit

  • Lake Lanier Convention & Visitors Bureau
  • Hall County Archived October 14, 2002, at the Wayback Machine web site from Roadside Georgia
  • Hall County Government official site
  • GaGEN Web Hall County section
  • This Day in Georgia History: December 15, Ed Jackson and Charly Pou, Carl Vinson Institute of Government, The University of Georgia
  • Documents from Hall County at the Digital Library of Georgia
  • Hall County Sesquicentennial historical marker
  • Historic Redwine historical marker

Coordinates: 34°19′N 83°49′W / 34.32°N 83.82°W / 34.32; -83.82