Netherlands
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s)Oranje (Orange)
Leeuwinnen (Lionesses)[1]
AssociationRoyal Dutch Football Association
(Koninklijke Nederlandse Voetbalbond)
ConfederationUEFA (Europe)
Head coachSarina Wiegman
CaptainSari van Veenendaal
Most capsSherida Spitse (175)
Top scorerVivianne Miedema (69)
FIFA codeNED
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 3 Steady (27 September 2019)[2]
Highest3[2] (July 2019)
Lowest20[2] (June 2008)
First international
 France 4–0 Netherlands 
(Hazebrouck, France; 17 April 1971)
Biggest win
 Netherlands 12–0 Israel 
(Zaandam, Netherlands; 22 August 1977)
 Netherlands 13–1 Macedonia 
(Zwolle, Netherlands; 29 October 2009)
Biggest defeat
 Sweden 7–0 Netherlands 
(Borås, Sweden; 26 September 1981)
World Cup
Appearances2 (first in 2015)
Best resultRunners-up (2019)
European Championship
Appearances3 (first in 2009)
Best resultWinners (2017)
Netherlands women's national football team in May 2014

The Netherlands women's national football team (Dutch: Nederlands vrouwenvoetbalelftal) is directed by the Royal Dutch Football Association (KNVB), which is a member of UEFA and FIFA.

In 1971, the team played the first women's international football match recognized by FIFA against France.[3] They have played at the final tournament of the 2009, 2013, and 2017 UEFA Women's Championship and were champions in 2017. They have played at the final tournament of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time, and reached thirteenth place. They have also played at the final tournament in the 2019 edition, losing 2-0 the final against the United States.

The nicknames for the team are Oranje (Orange) and Leeuwinnen (Lionesses).[1] Sarina Wiegman has been head coach since January 2017.[4] As of July 2019, the team is ranked number 3 in the FIFA Women's World Rankings.

History

On 17 April 1971, the Dutch team played the first women's international football match recognized by FIFA against France.[3] The match took place in Hazebrouck, France and resulted in a 4–0 defeat for the Netherlands.[5]

In 1980s and 1990s, the team failed to qualify for the final tournaments of UEFA's European Championship and later also for the FIFA's World Championship.[5] The Royal Dutch Football Association began major investments into women's football in the 2000s, culminating in the establishment of the Women's Eredivisie in 2007 (which was merged with the Belgian league in 2012).[6][7] The team qualified for the UEFA Women's Euro 2009 and reached third place together with Norway, after England (second place) and Germany (first place).[8] The team again qualified for the UEFA Women's Euro 2013, but did not advance after the group stage.[9]

The team qualified for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup and reached thirteenth place, after having lost their first match in the knockout stage to Japan.[10]

In 2017, the Netherlands won their first major women's trophy, ending Germany's seemingly unbeatable reign over the UEFA Women's Championship and surprising friend and foe alike by winning the tournament on home soil, beating Denmark 4–2 in the final.[11] The successful campaign in which Oranje managed to win all of their matches highly contributed to the popularity of women's football in the Netherlands.[12]

In 2018, the Netherlands finished second in their UEFA Qualifying Group behind Norway. Therefore, they had to go through the UEFA play-off in order to qualify for the 2019 World Cup featuring the Switzerland, Belgium and Denmark are the other teams in the play-off.[13]. The Netherlands beat Denmark 4-1 on aggregate in the play-off semi-finals before beating Switzerland 4-1 on aggregate in the play-off final to qualify.[14]

Tournament record

FIFA World Cup


On 27 November 2014, the Netherlands national football team qualified to the final tournament of the FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time.[15] In 2019, they reached the Final and lost to the United States team.[16]

Netherlands's FIFA World Cup record
Host nation
and year
Result Pos Pld W D* L GF GA
China 1991 Did not qualify
Sweden 1995
United States 1999
United States 2003
China 2007
Germany 2011
Canada 2015 Round of 16 13th 4 1 1 2 3 4
France 2019 Runners-up 2nd 7 6 0 1 11 5
Total 2/8 2nd 11 7 1 3 14 9
* Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Olympic Games

Netherlands's Olympic Games record
Host nation
and year
Round Pos Pld W D* L GF GA
United States 1996 Did not qualify
Australia 2000
Greece 2004
China 2008
United Kingdom 2012
Brazil 2016
Japan 2020 Qualified
Total 1/7

UEFA European Championship


The Netherlands failed to qualify for the final tournament of the UEFA Women's Championship from 1984 to 2005. In 2009, the Dutch women's team qualified and reached third place.[17] In 2013, they qualified again, but did not advance after the group stage.[18] The Dutch women booked a major victory on the 2017 tournament: following a 4–2 victory over Denmark they became the new European champion. Furthermore, Lieke Martens was heralded as the best player of the tournament.[19]

Netherlands's UEFA European Championship record
Host nation(s)
and year
Result Pos Pld W D* L GF GA
1984** Did not qualify
Norway 1987
West Germany 1989
Denmark 1991
Italy 1993
England Germany Norway Sweden 1995
Norway 1997
Germany 2001
England 2005
Finland 2009 Semi-finals 3rd 5 2 1 2 6 5
Sweden 2013 Group stage 12th 3 0 1 2 0 2
Netherlands 2017 Champions 1st 6 6 0 0 13 3
Total 3/12 14 8 2 4 19 10
* Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
** Missing flag indicates no host country.

Algarve Cup

The Algarve Cup is a global invitational tournament for national teams in women's soccer hosted by the Portuguese Football Federation (FPF). Held annually in the Algarve region of Portugal since 1994, it is one of the most prestigious women's football events, alongside the Women's World Cup and Women's Olympic Football.

Year Result Pld W D* L GF GA
1994 Did not enter
1995 5th place 4 1 1 2 3 5
1996 Did not enter
1997 5th place 4 2 0 2 2 5
1998 6th place 4 1 0 3 4 11
1999 Did not enter
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017 5th place 4 3 0 1 7 5
2018 Champions[20][21] 3 3 0 0 9 4
2019 11th place 3 0 1 2 1 4
Total 6/26 22 10 2 10 26 34
* Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Results and fixtures

The following is a list of matches in the last 12 months, as well as any future matches that have been scheduled.[22]

2018

2019

Technical staff

As of 31 October 2019.[23]
Name Position
Head Coach Sarina Wiegman
Assistant Coach Arvid Smit
Assistant Coach Arjan Veurink
Goalkeeper Coach Erskine Schoenmakers
Exercise Physiologist Niels de Vries

Players

Caps and goals may be incorrect.

Current squad

The following 23 players were named to the squad for the UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifiers against  Turkey and  Slovenia on 8 and 12 November 2019, respectively.[24]

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1GK Loes Geurts (1986-01-12) 12 January 1986 (age 33) 123 0 Sweden Göteborg
1GK Sari van Veenendaal (captain) (1990-04-03) 3 April 1990 (age 29) 64 0 Spain Atlético Madrid
1GK Jennifer Vreugdenhil (1995-01-12) 12 January 1995 (age 24) 1 0 Spain Valencia

2DF Dominique Bloodworth (1995-01-17) 17 January 1995 (age 24) 58 2 Germany VfL Wolfsburg
2DF Anouk Dekker (1986-11-15) 15 November 1986 (age 33) 85 7 France Montpellier
2DF Merel van Dongen (1993-02-11) 11 February 1993 (age 26) 37 1 Spain Real Betis
2DF Kika van Es (1991-10-11) 11 October 1991 (age 28) 61 0 England Everton
2DF Danique Kerkdijk (1996-05-01) 1 May 1996 (age 23) 14 0 England Brighton & Hove Albion
2DF Desiree van Lunteren (1992-12-30) 30 December 1992 (age 26) 82 0 Netherlands Ajax
2DF Liza van der Most (1993-10-08) 8 October 1993 (age 26) 14 0 Netherlands Ajax
2DF Aniek Nouwen (1999-03-09) 9 March 1999 (age 20) 3 0 Netherlands PSV

3MF Daniëlle van de Donk (1991-08-05) 5 August 1991 (age 28) 100 18 England Arsenal
3MF Jackie Groenen (1994-12-17) 17 December 1994 (age 24) 56 3 England Manchester United
3MF Inessa Kaagman (1996-04-17) 17 April 1996 (age 23) 2 0 England Everton
3MF Victoria Pelova (1999-06-03) 3 June 1999 (age 20) 6 0 Netherlands Ajax
3MF Jill Roord (1997-04-22) 22 April 1997 (age 22) 52 5 England Arsenal
3MF Sherida Spitse (1990-05-29) 29 May 1990 (age 29) 173 35 Norway Vålerenga

4FW Lineth Beerensteyn (1996-10-11) 11 October 1996 (age 23) 51 11 Germany Bayern Munich
4FW Renate Jansen (1990-12-07) 7 December 1990 (age 28) 39 3 Netherlands Twente
4FW Vivianne Miedema (1996-07-15) 15 July 1996 (age 23) 85 65 England Arsenal
4FW Shanice van de Sanden (1992-10-02) 2 October 1992 (age 27) 73 17 France Lyon
4FW Katja Snoeijs (1996-08-31) 31 August 1996 (age 23) 0 0 Netherlands PSV
4FW Ashleigh Weerden (1999-06-07) 7 June 1999 (age 20) 2 0 Netherlands Twente

Recent call-ups

The following players were named to a squad in the last 12 months.

This list may be incomplete.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Lize Kop (1998-03-17) 17 March 1998 (age 21) 1 0 Netherlands Ajax v.  Russia, 8 October 2019
GK Barbara Lorsheyd (1991-03-26) 26 March 1991 (age 28) 0 0 Netherlands Den Haag 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup SBY

DF Stefanie van der Gragt (1992-08-16) 16 August 1992 (age 27) 63 9 Spain Barcelona v.  Russia, 8 October 2019
DF Lynn Wilms (2000-10-03) 3 October 2000 (age 19) 1 0 Netherlands Twente v.  Russia, 8 October 2019
DF Siri Worm (1992-04-20) 20 April 1992 (age 27) 39 1 England Tottenham Hotspur 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup SBY

MF Cheyenne van den Goorbergh (1997-09-06) 6 September 1997 (age 22) 1 1 Netherlands Twente 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup SBY

FW Ellen Jansen (1992-10-06) 6 October 1992 (age 27) 16 2 Netherlands Ajax v.  Russia, 8 October 2019
FW Fenna Kalma (1999-11-21) 21 November 1999 (age 19) 0 0 Netherlands Twente v.  Russia, 8 October 2019
FW Lieke Martens (1992-12-16) 16 December 1992 (age 26) 110 44 Spain Barcelona 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup

Notes:

  • PRE: Preliminary squad
  • SBY: Stand-by list

Head coaches

Period Coach Notes Reference(s)
1972–1973 Siem Plooyer [25]
1973–1974 Bert Wouterse [25]
1974–1975 Ger Blok [25]
1975–1977 Ron Groenewoud [25]
1977–1978 Ruud de Groot [25]
1979–1987 Bert van Lingen [25]
1987 Nick Labohm coached in one match (3–1 defeat to West Germany on 1 April 1987) [25]
1987 Dick Advocaat coached in one match (0–0 against Norway on 23 May 1987) [25]
1987–1989 Piet Buter [25]
1989–1992 Bert van Lingen second spell as coach (first spell from 1979 to 1987) [25][26]
1992–1995 Jan Derks [25][26]
1995–2001 Ruud Dokter [25][26]
2001 Andries Jonker interim coach [25][26]
2001–2004 Frans de Kat [25][26]
2004 Remy Reynierse interim coach [25][26]
2004–2010 Vera Pauw [25][26][27][28]
2010 Ed Engelkes interim coach [25][26]
2010–2015 Roger Reijners [25][26][29][28]
2015 Sarina Wiegman interim coach [30]
2015–2016 Arjan van der Laan [30]
2016–2017 Sarina Wiegman second spell as interim coach (first spell in 2015) [4]
2017– permanent coach

Team records

Current players are highlighted in orange.

Most capped players

Name Period Matches Goals
1 Sherida Spitse 2006 – present 175 39
2 Annemieke Kiesel-Griffioen 1995–2011 156 19
3 Dyanne Bito 2000–2015 146 6
4 Marleen Wissink Righthand.svgLefthand.svg 1989–2006 141 0
5 Daphne Koster 1997–2017 139 7
6 Manon Melis 2005–2016 136 59
7 Loes Geurts Righthand.svgLefthand.svg 2005 – present 123 0
8 Lieke Martens 2011 – present 110 44
9 Sylvia Smit 2004–2013 106 30
10 Sarina Wiegman 1987–2001 104 3

As of 12 November 2019

Top scorers

Name Period Goals Caps Goals/Caps
1 Vivianne Miedema 2013 – present 69 87 0,79
2 Manon Melis 2005 – 2016 59 136 0,43
3 Lieke Martens 2011 – present 44 110 0,40
4 Sherida Spitse 2006 – present 39 175 0,22
5 Sylvia Smit 2004 – 2013 30 106 0,28
6 Marjoke de Bakker 1979 – 1991 29 60 0,48
7 Danielle van de Donk 2010 - present 21 102 0,21
8 Annemieke Kiesel-Griffioen 1995 – 2011 19 156 0,12
9 Shanice van de Sanden 2008 – present 18 75 0,24
9 Kirsten van de Ven 2005 - 2016 18 86 0,21

As of 12 November 2019

Coaches

Name Period Matches
1 Netherlands Vera Pauw 2004–2010 73
2 Netherlands Roger Reijners 2010–2015 71
3 Netherlands Ruud Dokter 1995–2000 64
4 Netherlands Sarina Wiegman 2015 – present 53
5 Netherlands Bert van Lingen 1979 – 1986, 1989 – 1991 46
6 Netherlands Frans de Kat 2001–2004 27
7 Netherlands Jan Derks 1991–1994 19
8 Netherlands Arjan van der Laan 2015–2016 16
9 Netherlands Piet Buter 1987–1989 15
10 Netherlands Ruud de Groot 1977–1978 8
Netherlands Andries Jonker 2001

As of 12 November 2019

Overall official record

  • All results list the Netherlands goal tally first.
  • Goal scorers are sorted alphabetically.
  • Colors gold, silver, and bronze indicate first-, second-, and third-place finishes.
Abbreviation Key table
EC European Championship (Women's Euro)
WC World Cup
OG Olympic Games
QS Qualification tournament
Competition Stage Result Opponent Position Scorers
1984 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.4 2–3, 5–0 Belgium Belgium 2 / 4 Camper, Fortuin, De Haan, De Jong-Desaunois, Timisela, Timmer, De Visser
2–1, 0–2 Denmark Denmark De Bakker, Camper
2–2, 1–1 Germany West Germany Camper, De Visser (2)
1987 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.3 1–0, 5–3 France France 2 / 4 Allott (4), De Bakker, Camper
0–2, 2–0 Sweden Sweden De Bakker, Vestjens
3–1, 3–0 Belgium Belgium Allott (2), De Bakker, Boogerd, Timisela (2)
1989 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.2 0–0, 1–0 Sweden Sweden 1 / 4 De Bakker
4–0, w/o Scotland Scotland De Bakker (2), Timisela, Wiegman
1–0, 2–0 Republic of Ireland Ireland De Bakker, Timisela, De Winter
Quarter-finals 1–2, 0–3 Norway Norway De Bakker
1991 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.1 2–0, 0–0 Republic of Ireland Ireland 1 / 3 Vestjens (2)
6–0, 9–0 Northern Ireland Northern Ireland Baal, De Bakker (6), Geeris, Limbeek (2), Pauw, Timisela (2), Vestjens, Van Waarden
Quarter-finals 0–0, 0–1 (a.e.t.) Denmark Denmark
1993 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.5 3–0, 2–0 Greece Greece 1 / 3 Geeris (3), Limbeek, Timisela
1–1, 0–0 Romania Romania Van der Ploeg
Quarter-finals 0–3, 0–3 Norway Norway
1995 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.8 1–2, 0–1 Iceland Iceland 2 / 3 Leemans
2–0, 4–0 Greece Greece Van Dam (2), Keereweer, Limbeek, Noom, Roos
1997 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.2
(Class A)
0–2, 0–2 Iceland Iceland 4 / 4
1–1, 1–0 Russia Russia Korbmacher, Van Waarden
1–1, 1–2 France France Korbmacher, Migchelsen
Relegation Play-off 2–1, 1–0 Czech Republic Czech Republic Kiesel-Griffioen, Timisela, Wiegman
1999 WC QS Group Stage: Gr.3
(Class A)
1–6, 0–0 Norway Norway 3 / 4 Roos
0–1, 2–1 England England Noom (2)
1–0, 1–2 Germany Germany Migchelsen, Noom
2001 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.1
(Class A)
1–1, 1–2 France France 4 / 4 Van Eyk, Smith
1–1, 1–2 Spain Spain Kiesel-Griffioen, Smith
1–1, 0–3 Sweden Sweden Smith
Relegation Play-Off 3–0, 2–0 Hungary Hungary Kiesel-Griffioen, Muller, Noom, Torny (2)
2003 WC QS Group Stage: Gr.4
(Class A)
0–0, 1–4 England England 3 / 4 Kiesel-Griffioen
0–3, 0–6 Germany Germany
1–2, 4–1 Portugal Portugal Burger, Muller, Noom, Ran, Smith
2005 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.2
(Class A)
0–1 0–0 Spain Spain 4 / 5
0–2, 0–2 Norway Norway
0–3, 1–5 Denmark Denmark Ran
3–0, 3–0 Belgium Belgium De Boer, Koster, Melis, Muller, Torny, Van Veen
2007 WC QS Group Stage: Gr.5
(Class A)
1–0, 0–2 France France 3 / 5 De Boer
1–0, 4–0 Austria Austria Delies, Demarteau, Louwaars, Smit (2)
0–1, 0–4 England England
5–0, 4–0 Hungary Hungary Delies, Hoogendijk, Louwaars (2), Smit, Smith, Stevens (3)
2009 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.4 1–5, 0–1 Germany Germany 2 / 5 Torny
2–2, 1–1 Switzerland Switzerland Van Eijk, Melis (2)
2–1, 1–0 Wales Wales Melis (2), Smit
2–2, 3–0 Belgium Belgium Hoogendijk, Melis (3), Stevens
Play-Off 2–0, 2–0 Spain Spain Stevens (3), Van de Ven
Finland 2009 EC Group Stage: Gr.A
2–0
Ukraine Ukraine 2 / 4 Stevens, Van de Ven
1–2
Finland Finland Van de Ven
2–1
Denmark Denmark Melis, Smit
Quarter-finals 0–0 (a.e.t.) (5–4 p) France France
Semi-finals 1–2 (a.e.t.) England England Pieëte
2011 WC QS Group Stage: Gr.1 0–3, 2–2 Norway Norway 2 / 5 Dekker, Melis
13–1, 7–0 Republic of Macedonia Macedonia Hoogendijk, Kiesel-Griffioen (4), Koster, Melis (2), Meulen, Pieëte, De Ridder, Slegers, Smit (7), Spitse
1–1, 4–0 Belarus Belarus Melis (2), De Ridder, Slegers, Van de Ven
2–0, 1–0 Slovakia Slovakia Kiesel-Griffioen, Koster, Smit
2013 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.6 6–0, 4–0 Serbia Serbia 2 / 5 Van den Berg, Van de Donk, Hoogendijk, Martens, Melis (6)
3–0, 2–0 Croatia Croatia Melis, De Ridder, Smit, Spitse, Van de Ven
0–0, 0–1 England England
2–0, 3–1 Slovenia Slovenia Heuver, Melis, De Ridder, Van de Ven (2)
Sweden 2013 EC Group Stage: Gr.B
0–0
Germany Germany 4 / 4
0–1
Norway Norway
0–1
Iceland Iceland
2015 WC QS Group Stage: Gr.5 4–0, 10–1 Albania Albania 2 / 6 Bakker, Van den Heiligenberg, Martens (2), Melis (3), Slegers (6), + 1 o.g.
7–0, 3–2 Portugal Portugal Van den Berg, Dekker, Miedema (6), Slegers (2)
1–2, 2–0 Norway Norway Dekker, Van de Donk, Miedema
7–0, 6–0 Greece Greece Bakker, Van den Berg (2), Martens (2), Melis (2), Middag, Miedema (4), Spitse
1–1, 2–0 Belgium Belgium Miedema (2), Slegers
Play-Off Semifinal 2–1, 2–0 Scotland Scotland Martens (2), Melis (2)
Play-Off Final 1–1, 2–1 Italy Italy Miedema (3)
Canada 2015 WC Group Stage: Gr.A
1–0
New Zealand New Zealand 3 / 4 Martens
0–1
China China
1–1
Canada Canada Van de Ven
Round of 16
1–2
Japan Japan Van de Ven
2016 OG QS Single Round-robin
4–3
  Switzerland 2 / 4 Van den Berg, Melis, Miedema, Van de Sanden
1–4
 Norway Melis
1–1
 Sweden Miedema
Netherlands 2017 EC Group Stage: Gr.A
1–0
Norway Norway 1 / 4 Van de Sanden
1–0
Denmark Denmark Spitse
2–1
Belgium Belgium Martens, Spitse
Quarter-finals
2–0
Sweden Sweden Martens, Miedema
Semi-finals
3–0
England England Van de Donk, Miedema, + 1 o.g.
Final
4–2
Denmark Denmark Martens, Miedema (2), Spitse
2019 WC QS Group Stage: Gr.3 1–0 (h), 1–2 (a) Norway Norway 2 / 5 Miedema (2)
5–0 (a), 1–0 (h) Slovakia Slovakia Van der Gragt (2), Martens, Miedema (2), Spitse
0–0 (h), 2–0 (a) Republic of Ireland Ireland Beerensteyn, Spitse
7–0 (h), 5–0 (a) Northern Ireland Northern Ireland Beerensteyn, Van de Donk, Groenen, Martens (2), Miedema, Van de Sanden (2), Spitse (3), + 1 o.g.
Play-Off Semifinal 2–0 (h), 2–1 (a) Denmark Denmark Beerensteyn (3), Van de Sanden
Play-Off Final 3–0 (h), 1–1 (a) Switzerland Switzerland Miedema (2), Martens, Spitse
France 2019 WC Group Stage: Gr.E
1–0
New Zealand New Zealand 1 / 4 Roord
3–1
Cameroon Cameroon Miedema (2), Bloodworth
2–1
Canada Canada Dekker, Beerensteyn
Round of 16
2–1
Japan Japan Martens (2)
Quarter-finals
2–0
Italy Italy Miedema, Van der Gragt
Semi-finals
1–0 (a.e.t.)
Sweden Sweden Groenen
Final
0–2
United States United States

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Women's football in the Netherlands Archived 14 July 2014 at the Wayback Machine, Royal Dutch Football Association. Retrieved on 1 July 2014.
  2. ^ a b c "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 27 September 2019. Retrieved 27 September 2019.
  3. ^ a b "The women's football World Cup is about to start. Here's the lowdown on the Oranje Lionesses – DutchNews.nl". Retrieved 3 September 2015.
  4. ^ a b "Wiegman succeeds Van der Laan as Netherlands coach". UEFA. 13 January 2017. Retrieved 24 January 2017.
  5. ^ a b "NEDERLANDS VROUWENELFTAL. htstorie" (in Dutch). www.onsoranje.nl. Retrieved 8 April 2018.
  6. ^ Lewis, Aimee (6 July 2019). "USA vs. Netherlands: Dutch World Cup success was decades in the making". CNN. Retrieved 6 July 2019.
  7. ^ Baxter, Kevin (4 July 2019). "Netherlands looks to add Women's World Cup title to European championship". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 6 July 2019.
  8. ^ uefa.com. "UEFA Women's EURO 2009 - History - – UEFA.com". UEFA.com. Retrieved 3 September 2015.
  9. ^ "UEFA Women's Euro history. Netherlands". www.uefa.com. Retrieved 8 April 2018.
  10. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup Canada 2015. Teams. Netherlands". www.uefa.com. Retrieved 8 April 2018.
  11. ^ "NETHERLANDS VS. DENMARK 4 – 2". uk.soccerway.com. Retrieved 8 April 2018.
  12. ^ "Dutch women's football aiming high". www.uefa.com. Retrieved 8 April 2018.
  13. ^ "Women's World Cup play-off draw on Friday". Retrieved 6 September 2018.
  14. ^ "Netherlands win World Cup play-offs". 13 November 2018. Retrieved 13 November 2018.
  15. ^ "Italy–Netherlands playoff match". UEFA. 27 November 2014. Retrieved 27 November 2014.
  16. ^ "FIFA Women's World Cup France 2019™ - Matches - USA - Netherlands". FIFA.com. Fédération Internationale de Football Association. 7 July 2019. Retrieved 8 July 2019.
  17. ^ UEFA Women's EURO 2009, UEFA. Retrieved on 1 July 2014.
  18. ^ Group B, UEFA. Retrieved on 1 July 2014.
  19. ^ "Lieke Martens named player of the tournament". www.uefa.com. Retrieved 8 April 2018.
  20. ^ "Finale Algarve Cup tussen Oranjevrouwen en Zweden afgelast" (in Dutch). nu.nl. 7 March 2018. Retrieved 7 March 2018.
  21. ^ @Algarve_Cup (7 March 2018). "UPDATE: The match between the Netherlands and Sweden has been cancelled due to heavy rain. As a result, both teams will be awarded 1st place" (Tweet) – via Twitter.
  22. ^ "OnsOranje – Uitslagen". www.onsoranje.nl.
  23. ^ "ARVID SMIT AAN DE SLAG ALS ASSISTENT-COACH ORANJELEEUWINNEN". KNVB. 31 October 2019. Retrieved 2 November 2019.
  24. ^ https://www.onsoranje.nl/nieuws/nederlands-vrouwenelftal/77119/rentree-groenen-van-es-en-van-de-sanden-bij-oranjeleeuwinnen
  25. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r "Bondscoaches Aller Tijden Oranje vrouwen (1972–2011)". vrouwenvoetbalnederland.nl (in Dutch). 19 October 2011. Archived from the original on 10 October 2016.
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Media Guide Netherlands national Women's Team World Cup 2015" (PDF). KNVB. p. 15 (section 'Coaches since 1990'). Retrieved 23 December 2017.
  27. ^ (in Dutch) "De loopbaan van Vera Pauw", Intermediair, 2009. Retrieved on 3 July 2014.
  28. ^ a b (in Dutch) Hugo Logtenberg, "Roger Reijners nieuwe bondscoach vrouwenelftal", de Volkskrant, 2010. Retrieved on 3 July 2014.
  29. ^ (in Dutch) Spelers en Staf: Vrouwen A-elftal Archived 5 July 2014 at the Wayback Machine, Ons Oranje. Retrieved on 2 July 2014.
  30. ^ a b "Van der Laan replaces Reijners as Dutch coach". UEFA. Retrieved 24 October 2015.

External links

  • OnsOranje.nl – official website (in Dutch)
  • FIFA profile