400 (number)

Summary

400 (four hundred) is the natural number following 399 and preceding 401.

← 399 400 401 →
Cardinalfour hundred
Ordinal400th
(four hundredth)
Factorization24 × 52
Divisors1, 2, 4, 5, 8, 10, 16, 20, 25, 40, 50, 80, 100, 200, 400
Greek numeralΥ´
Roman numeralCD
Binary1100100002
Ternary1122113
Octal6208
Duodecimal29412
Hexadecimal19016
Hebrewת (Tav)

Mathematical propertiesEdit

400 is the square of 20. 400 is the sum of the powers of 7 from 0 to 3, thus making it a repdigit in base 7 (1111).

A circle is divided into 400 grads, which is equal to 360 degrees and 2π radians. (Degrees and radians are the SI accepted units).

400 is a self number in base 10, since there is no integer that added to the sum of its own digits results in 400. On the other hand, 400 is divisible by the sum of its own base 10 digits, making it a Harshad number.

Other fieldsEdit

Four hundred is also

Integers from 401 to 499Edit

400sEdit

401Edit

A prime number, tetranacci number,[2] sum of seven consecutive primes (43 + 47 + 53 + 59 + 61 + 67 + 71), sum of nine consecutive primes (29 + 31 + 37 + 41 + 43 + 47 + 53 + 59 + 61), Chen prime,[3] Eisenstein prime with no imaginary part, prime index prime, Mertens function returns 0,[4] member of the Mian–Chowla sequence.[5]

402Edit

402 = 2 × 3 × 67, sphenic number, nontotient, Harshad number, number of graphs with 8 nodes and 9 edges[6]

403Edit

403 = 13 × 31, heptagonal number, Mertens function returns 0.[4]

404Edit

404 = 22 × 101, Mertens function returns 0,[4] nontotient, noncototient, number of integer partitions of 20 with an alternating permutation.[8]

405Edit

405 = 34 × 5, Mertens function returns 0,[4] Harshad number, pentagonal pyramidal number;

406Edit

406 = 2 × 7 × 29, sphenic number, triangular number, centered nonagonal number,[9] nontotient

  • 406 is a poem by John Boyle O'Reilly. It was believed to have been the number of one of O'Reilly's prison cells, and was the number of his first hotel room after he arrived in the United States. Hence the number had a mystical significance to him, as intimated in the poem.
  • Peugeot 406 car.
  • Area code for all of Montana.

407Edit

407 = 11 × 37,

  • sum of cubes of 4, 0 and 7 (43 + 03 + 73 = 407); narcissistic number[10]
  • sum of three consecutive primes (131 + 137 + 139)
  • Mertens function returns 0[4]
  • Harshad number
  • lazy caterer number (sequence A000124 in the OEIS)
  • HTTP status code for "Proxy Authentication Required"
  • Area code for Orlando, Florida
  • Colloquial name for the Express Toll Route in Ontario

408Edit

408 = 23 × 3 × 17

409Edit

409 is a prime number, Chen prime,[3] centered triangular number.[14]

410sEdit

410Edit

410 = 2 × 5 × 41, sphenic number, sum of six consecutive primes (59 + 61 + 67 + 71 + 73 + 79), nontotient, Harshad number, number of triangle-free graphs on 8 vertices[16]

411Edit

411 = 3 × 137, self number,[17]

  • HTTP status code for "Length Required", slang for information (see 4-1-1)
  • The number of possible FM broadcasting frequencies between 87.50 and 108.00 MHz in 50 kHz spacing countries[importance?]

412Edit

412 = 22 × 103, nontotient, noncototient, sum of twelve consecutive primes (13 + 17 + 19 + 23 + 29 + 31 + 37 + 41 + 43 + 47 + 53 + 59), 41264 + 1 is prime

413Edit

413 = 7 × 59, Mertens function returns 0,[4] self number,[17] Blum integer

414Edit

414 = 2 × 32 × 23, Mertens function returns 0,[4] nontotient, Harshad number, number of balanced partitions of 31[18]

  is prime[19]

415Edit

415 = 5 × 83, logarithmic number[20]

  • HTTP status code for "Unsupported Media Type"
  • 415 Records, a record label
  • 415 refers to California Penal Code, section 415, pertaining to public fighting, public disturbance, and public use of offensive words likely to provoke an immediate violent reaction.
  • Area code 415, a telephone area code for San Francisco, California

416Edit

416 = 25 × 13, number of independent vertex sets and vertex covers in the 6-sunlet graph[21]

417Edit

417 = 3 × 139, Blum integer

418Edit

418 = 2 × 11 × 19, sphenic number, balanced number[22]

419Edit

A prime number, Sophie Germain prime,[25] Chen prime, Eisenstein prime with no imaginary part, highly cototient number,[26] Mertens function returns 0[4]

  • refers to the Nigerian advance fee fraud scheme (after the section of the Nigerian Criminal Code it violates)

420sEdit

420Edit

421Edit

422Edit

422 = 2 × 211, Mertens function returns 0,[4] nontotient, since 422 = 202 + 20 + 2 it is the maximum number of regions into which 21 intersecting circles divide the plane.[28]

423Edit

423 = 32 × 47, Mertens function returns 0,[4] Harshad number, number of secondary structures of RNA molecules with 10 nucleotides[29]

424Edit

424 = 23 × 53, sum of ten consecutive primes (23 + 29 + 31 + 37 + 41 + 43 + 47 + 53 + 59 + 61), Mertens function returns 0,[4] refactorable number,[30] self number[17]

425Edit

425 = 52 × 17, pentagonal number,[31] centered tetrahedral number, sum of three consecutive primes (137 + 139 + 149), Mertens function returns 0,[4] the second number that can be expressed as the sum of two squares in three different ways (425 = 202 + 52 = 192 + 82 = 162 + 132).

426Edit

426 = 2 × 3 × 71, sphenic number, nontotient, untouchable number

427Edit

427 = 7 × 61, Mertens function returns 0.[4] 427! + 1 is prime.

428Edit

428 = 22 × 107, Mertens function returns 0, nontotient, 42832 + 1 is prime[32]

429Edit

429 = 3 × 11 × 13, sphenic number, Catalan number[33]

430sEdit

430Edit

430 = 2 × 5 × 43, sphenic number, untouchable number[13]

431Edit

A prime number, Sophie Germain prime,[25] sum of seven consecutive primes (47 + 53 + 59 + 61 + 67 + 71 + 73), Chen prime, prime index prime, Eisenstein prime with no imaginary part

432Edit

432 = 24 × 33 = 42 × 33, the sum of four consecutive primes (103 + 107 + 109 + 113), a highly totient number,[34] an Achilles number and the sum of totient function for first 37 integers. 432! is the first factorial that is not a Harshad number in base 10. 432 is also three-dozen sets of a dozen, making it three gross. An equilateral triangle whose area and perimeter are equal, has an area (and perimeter) equal to  .

433Edit

A prime number, Markov number,[35] star number.[36]

  • The perfect score in the game show Fifteen To One, only ever achieved once in over 2000 shows.
  • 433 can refer to composer John Cage's composition 4′33″ (pronounced "Four minutes, thirty-three seconds" or just "Four thirty-three").

434Edit

434 = 2 × 7 × 31, sphenic number, sum of six consecutive primes (61 + 67 + 71 + 73 + 79 + 83), nontotient, maximal number of pieces that can be obtained by cutting an annulus with 28 cuts[37]

435Edit

435 = 3 × 5 × 29, sphenic number, triangular number, hexagonal number,[38] self number,[17] number of compositions of 16 into distinct parts[39]

436Edit

436 = 22 × 109, nontotient, noncototient, lazy caterer number (sequence A000124 in the OEIS)

437Edit

437 = 19 × 23, Blum integer

438Edit

438 = 2 × 3 × 73, sphenic number, Smith number.[40]

439Edit

A prime number, sum of three consecutive primes (139 + 149 + 151), sum of nine consecutive primes (31 + 37 + 41 + 43 + 47 + 53 + 59 + 61 + 67), strictly non-palindromic number[41]

440sEdit

440Edit

440 = 23 × 5 × 11, the sum of the first seventeen prime numbers, Harshad number,

441Edit

441 = 32 × 72 = 212

  • 441 is the sum of the cubes of the first 6 natural numbers (441 = 13 + 23 + 33 + 43 + 53 + 63).
  • 441 is a centered octagonal number,[42] a refactorable number,[30] and a Harshad number.
  • 441 is the number of squares on a Super Scrabble board.

442Edit

442 = 2 × 13 × 17 = 212 + 1,[43] sphenic number, sum of eight consecutive primes (41 + 43 + 47 + 53 + 59 + 61 + 67 + 71)

443Edit

A prime number, Sophie Germain prime,[25] Chen prime, Eisenstein prime with no imaginary part, Mertens function sets new low of -9, which stands until 659.

  • In computing, it is the default port for HTTPS connections.

444Edit

444 = 22 × 3 × 37, refactorable number,[30] Harshad number, number of noniamonds without holes.[44]

445Edit

445 = 5 × 89, number of series-reduced trees with 17 nodes[45]

446Edit

446 = 2 × 223, nontotient, self number[17]

447Edit

447 = 3 × 149, number of 1's in all partitions of 22 into odd parts[46]

448Edit

448 = 26 × 7, untouchable number,[13] refactorable number,[30] Harshad number

449Edit

A prime number, sum of five consecutive primes (79 + 83 + 89 + 97 + 101), Chen prime, Eisenstein prime with no imaginary part, Proth prime.[47] Also the largest number whose factorial is less than 101000

450sEdit

450Edit

450 = 2 × 32 × 52, nontotient, sum of totient function for first 38 integers, refactorable number,[30] Harshad number,

451Edit

451 = 11 × 41; 451 is a Wedderburn–Etherington number[48] and a centered decagonal number;[49] its reciprocal has period 10; 451 is the smallest number with this period reciprocal length.

452Edit

452 = 22 × 113, number of surface-points of a tetrahedron with edge-length 15[51]

  • SMTP code meaning that the requested mail action was not carried out because of insufficient system storage

453Edit

453 = 3 × 151, Blum integer

454Edit

454 = 2 × 227, nontotient, a Smith number[40]

455Edit

455 = 5 × 7 × 13, sphenic number, tetrahedral number[52]

456Edit

456 = 23 × 3 × 19, sum of a twin prime (227 + 229), sum of four consecutive primes (107 + 109 + 113 + 127), centered pentagonal number,[54] icosahedral number

457Edit

  • A prime number, sum of three consecutive primes (149 + 151 + 157), self number.[17]
  • The international standard frequency for radio avalanche transceivers (457 kHz).

458Edit

458 = 2 × 229, nontotient, number of partitions of 24 into divisors of 24[55]

459Edit

459 = 33 × 17, triangular matchstick number[56]

460sEdit

460Edit

460 = 22 × 5 × 23, centered triangular number,[14] dodecagonal number,[57] Harshad number, sum of twelve consecutive primes (17 + 19 + 23 + 29 + 31 + 37 + 41 + 43 + 47 + 53 + 59 + 61)

461Edit

A prime number, Chen prime, sexy prime with 467, Eisenstein prime with no imaginary part, prime index prime

462Edit

462 = 2 × 3 × 7 × 11, binomial coefficient  , stirling number of the second kind  , sum of six consecutive primes (67 + 71 + 73 + 79 + 83 + 89), pronic number,[58] sparsely totient number,[59] idoneal number

463Edit

A prime number, sum of seven consecutive primes (53 + 59 + 61 + 67 + 71 + 73 + 79), centered heptagonal number,[60]

464Edit

464 = 24 × 29, primitive abundant number,[61] since 464 = 212 + 21 + 2 it is the maximum number of regions into which 22 intersecting circles divide the plane,[62] maximal number of pieces that can be obtained by cutting an annulus with 29 cuts[63]


  • In chess it is the number of legal positions of the kings, not counting mirrored positions. Has some importance when constructing an endgame tablebase.
  • Model number of the home computer Amstrad CPC 464.
  • See also: 4-6-4

465Edit

465 = 3 × 5 × 31, sphenic number, triangular number, member of the Padovan sequence,[64] Harshad number

466Edit

466 = 2 × 233, noncototient, lazy caterer number (sequence A000124 in the OEIS)

467Edit

A prime number, safe prime,[65] sexy prime with 461, Chen prime, Eisenstein prime with no imaginary part

  is prime[66]

468Edit

468 = 22 × 32 × 13, sum of ten consecutive primes (29 + 31 + 37 + 41 + 43 + 47 + 53 + 59 + 61 + 67), refactorable number,[30] self number,[17] Harshad number

469Edit

469 = 7 × 67, centered hexagonal number.[67] 469! - 1 is prime.

470sEdit

470Edit

470 = 2 × 5 × 47, sphenic number, nontotient, noncototient, cake number

  • In golf, 470 is the minimum length in yards from the tee to the hole on a Par 5.
  • 470 is an Olympic class of sailing dinghy

471Edit

471 = 3 × 157, sum of three consecutive primes (151 + 157 + 163), perfect totient number,[68] φ(471) = φ(σ(471)).[69]

472Edit

472 = 23 × 59, nontotient, untouchable number,[13] refactorable number,[30] number of distinct ways to cut a 5 × 5 square into squares with integer sides[70]

  • The Amstrad CPC472 was a short-lived home computer for the Spanish market.

473Edit

473 = 11 × 43, sum of five consecutive primes (83 + 89 + 97 + 101 + 103), Blum integer

474Edit

474 = 2 × 3 × 79, sphenic number, sum of eight consecutive primes (43 + 47 + 53 + 59 + 61 + 67 + 71 + 73), nontotient, noncototient, sum of totient function for first 39 integers, untouchable number,[13] nonagonal number[71]

475Edit

475 = 52 × 19, 49-gonal number, member of the Mian–Chowla sequence.[5]

476Edit

476 = 22 × 7 × 17, Harshad number, admirable number[72]

477Edit

477 = 32 × 53, pentagonal number[31]

478Edit

478 = 2 × 239, Companion Pell number, number of partitions of 26 that do not contain 1 as a part[73]

479Edit

A prime number, safe prime,[65] sum of nine consecutive primes (37 + 41 + 43 + 47 + 53 + 59 + 61 + 67 + 71), Chen prime, Eisenstein prime with no imaginary part, self number[17]

480sEdit

480Edit

480 = 25 × 3 × 5, sum of a twin prime (239 + 241), sum of four consecutive primes (109 + 113 + 127 + 131), highly totient number,[34] refactorable number,[30] Harshad number

  is prime[74]

481Edit

481 = 13 × 37, octagonal number,[12] centered square number,[27] Harshad number

482Edit

482 = 2 × 241, nontotient, noncototient, number of series-reduced planted trees with 15 nodes[75]

483Edit

483 = 3 × 7 × 23, sphenic number, Smith number[40]

484Edit

484 = 22 × 112 = 222, palindromic square, nontotient

485Edit

485 = 5 × 97, number of triangles (of all sizes, including holes) in Sierpiński's triangle after 5 inscriptions[76]

486Edit

486 = 2 × 35, Harshad number, Perrin number[77]

487Edit

A prime number, sum of three consecutive primes (157 + 163 + 167), Chen prime,

  • The only primes under 7.74 × 1013 that divide their own decimal repetends are 3, 487, and 56598313.[78]
  • Shorthand for the Intel 80487 floating point processor chip.

488Edit

488 = 23 × 61, nontotient, refactorable number,[30] φ(488) = φ(σ(488)),[79] number of surface points on a cube with edge-length 10.[80]

489Edit

489 = 3 × 163, octahedral number[81]

490sEdit

490Edit

490 = 2 × 5 × 72, noncototient, sum of totient function for first 40 integers, partition number (integer partitions of 19),[82] self number.[17]

491Edit

A prime number, Sophie Germain prime,[25] Chen prime, Eisenstein prime with no imaginary part, strictly non-palindromic number[41]

492Edit

492 = 22 × 3 × 41, sum of six consecutive primes (71 + 73 + 79 + 83 + 89 + 97), refactorable number,[30] member of a Ruth–Aaron pair with 493 under first definition

493Edit

493 = 17 × 29, sum of seven consecutive primes (59 + 61 + 67 + 71 + 73 + 79 + 83), member of a Ruth–Aaron pair with 492 under first definition, the 493d centered octagonal number is also a centered square number[83]

494Edit

494 = 2 × 13 × 19 =  ,[84] sphenic number, nontotient

495Edit

495 is a pentatope number.

496Edit

496 is the third perfect number, a number whose divisors add up to the actual number (1+2+4+8+16+31+62+124+248=496).

497Edit

497 = 7 × 71, sum of five consecutive primes (89 + 97 + 101 + 103 + 107), lazy caterer number (sequence A000124 in the OEIS)

498Edit

498 = 2 × 3 × 83, sphenic number, untouchable number,[13] admirable number,[85] abundant number

499Edit

A prime number, Chen prime, 4499 - 3499 is prime

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "400 Bad Request - HTTP | MDN". developer.mozilla.org. Retrieved 2021-03-31.
  2. ^ "Sloane's A000078 : Tetranacci numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  3. ^ a b "Sloane's A109611 : Chen primes". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "Sloane's A028442 : Numbers n such that Mertens' function is zero". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  5. ^ a b "Sloane's A005282 : Mian-Chowla sequence". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  6. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A008406". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  7. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A083815". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  8. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A345170 (Number of integer partitions of n with an alternating permutation)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  9. ^ "Sloane's A060544 : Centered 9-gonal (also known as nonagonal or enneagonal) numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  10. ^ "Sloane's A005188 : Armstrong (or Plus Perfect, or narcissistic) numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  11. ^ "Sloane's A000129 : Pell numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  12. ^ a b "Sloane's A000567 : Octagonal numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  13. ^ a b c d e f "Sloane's A005114 : Untouchable numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  14. ^ a b "Sloane's A005448 : Centered triangular numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  15. ^ Google Maps [@googlemaps] (16 June 2016). "117 islands, 150 canals, 409 bridges. Explore #Venice with this #GoogleMaps Trek" (Tweet) – via Twitter. {{cite web}}: |author= has generic name (help)
  16. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A006785 (Number of triangle-free graphs on n vertices)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Sloane's A003052 : Self numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  18. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A047993 (Number of balanced partitions of n: the largest part equals the number of parts)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  19. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A162862 (Numbers n such that n^10 + n^9 + n^8 + n^7 + n^6 + n^5 + n^4 + n^3 + n^2 + n + 1 is prime)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2022-06-02.
  20. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A002104 (Logarithmic numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  21. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A080040". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  22. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A020492 (Balanced numbers: numbers k such that phi(k) (A000010) divides sigma(k) (A000203))". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  23. ^ L. Masinter (1 April 1998). "Hyper Text Coffee Pot Control Protocol (HTCPCP/1.0)". Network Working Group (RFC). Retrieved 13 Sep 2018. Any attempt to brew coffee with a teapot should result in the error code "418 I'm a teapot". The resulting entity body MAY be short and stout.
  24. ^ I. Nazar (1 April 2014). "The Hyper Text Coffee Pot Control Protocol for Tea Efflux Appliances (HTCPCP-TEA)". Ietf Request for Comments (RFC) Pages - Test (RFC). ISSN 2070-1721. Retrieved 13 Sep 2018. TEA-capable pots that are not provisioned to brew coffee may return either a status code of 503, indicating temporary unavailability of coffee, or a code of 418 as defined in the base HTCPCP specification to denote a more permanent indication that the pot is a teapot.
  25. ^ a b c d "Sloane's A005384 : Sophie Germain primes". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  26. ^ "Sloane's A100827 : Highly cototient numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  27. ^ a b "Sloane's A001844 : Centered square numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  28. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A014206". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  29. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A004148 (Generalized Catalan numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  30. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Sloane's A0033950 : Refactorable numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  31. ^ a b "Sloane's A000326 : Pentagonal numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  32. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A006315 (Numbers n such that n^32 + 1 is prime)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  33. ^ "Sloane's A000108 : Catalan numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  34. ^ a b "Sloane's A097942 : Highly totient numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  35. ^ "Sloane's A002559 : Markoff (or Markov) numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  36. ^ "Sloane's A003154 : Centered 12-gonal numbers. Also star numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  37. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000096". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  38. ^ "Sloane's A000384 : Hexagonal numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  39. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A032020 (Number of compositions (ordered partitions) of n into distinct parts)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2022-05-24.
  40. ^ a b c "Sloane's A006753 : Smith numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  41. ^ a b "Sloane's A016038 : Strictly non-palindromic numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  42. ^ "Sloane's A016754 : Odd squares: a(n) = (2n+1)^2. Also centered octagonal numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  43. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A002522". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  44. ^ "A070765". Retrieved 2022-05-10.
  45. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000014 (Number of series-reduced trees with n nodes)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  46. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A036469 (Partial sums of A000009 (partitions into distinct parts))". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  47. ^ "Sloane's A080076 : Proth primes". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  48. ^ "Sloane's A001190 : Wedderburn-Etherington numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  49. ^ "Sloane's A062786 : Centered 10-gonal numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  50. ^ "451 Unavailable For Legal Reasons - HTTP | MDN". developer.mozilla.org. Retrieved 2021-04-23.
  51. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A005893 (Number of points on surface of tetrahedron)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  52. ^ "Sloane's A000292 : Tetrahedral numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  53. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A111441 (Numbers k such that the sum of the squares of the first k primes is divisible by k)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2022-06-02.
  54. ^ "Sloane's A005891 : Centered pentagonal numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  55. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A018818 (Number of partitions of n into divisors of n)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  56. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A045943". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  57. ^ "Sloane's A051624 : 12-gonal (or dodecagonal) numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  58. ^ "Sloane's A002378 : Oblong (or promic, pronic, or heteromecic) numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  59. ^ "Sloane's A036913 : Sparsely totient numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  60. ^ "Sloane's A069099 : Centered heptagonal numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  61. ^ "Sloane's A091191 : Primitive abundant numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  62. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A014206". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  63. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000096". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  64. ^ "Sloane's A000931 : Padovan sequence". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  65. ^ a b "Sloane's A005385 : Safe primes". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  66. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A162862 (Numbers n such that n^10 + n^9 + n^8 + n^7 + n^6 + n^5 + n^4 + n^3 + n^2 + n + 1 is prime)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2022-06-02.
  67. ^ "Sloane's A003215 : Hex (or centered hexagonal) numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  68. ^ "Sloane's A082897 : Perfect totient numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  69. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A006872". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  70. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A045846 (Number of distinct ways to cut an n X n square into squares with integer sides)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2022-05-23.
  71. ^ "Sloane's A001106 : 9-gonal (or enneagonal or nonagonal) numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  72. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A111592 (Admirable numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  73. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A002865 (Number of partitions of n that do not contain 1 as a part)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2022-06-02.
  74. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A162862 (Numbers n such that n^10 + n^9 + n^8 + n^7 + n^6 + n^5 + n^4 + n^3 + n^2 + n + 1 is prime)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2022-06-02.
  75. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A001678 (Number of series-reduced planted trees with n nodes)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  76. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A048473". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  77. ^ "Sloane's A001608 : Perrin sequence". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  78. ^ "Sloane's A045616 : Primes p such that 10^(p-1) == 1 (mod p^2)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2018-05-31.
  79. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A006872". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  80. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A005897". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  81. ^ "Sloane's A005900 : Octahedral numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  82. ^ "Sloane's A000041 : a(n) = number of partitions of n (the partition numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.
  83. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A011900". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  84. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A008517". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  85. ^ "Sloane's A111592 : Admirable numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-06-10.