List of orbital launch systems

Summary

This is a list of conventional orbital launch systems. This is composed of carrier rockets, and other conventional systems, used to place satellites into orbit.

Argentina

  • ORBIT II – Retired[full citation needed][1][full citation needed]
  • TRONADORUnder Development[2][full citation needed]

Australia

Brazil

  • VLS-1 - Retired
  • VLMUnder Development

China, People's Republic

Several rockets of the Long March family
Long March 2F

Europe

Ariane 5

France

Germany

India

(From left to right) ISRO's SLV, ASLV, PSLV, GSLV and GSLV Mk. III rockets

Indonesia

Iran

Simorgh SLV

Iraq

Israel

Italy

Japan

Mu rockets
H-II series

New Zealand

North Korea

Republic of China (Taiwan)

Romania

  • HaasUnder Development

Russia

Proton-K
Soyuz-FG
Dnepr-1
Angara Family

South Africa

  • RSA-3 - Development Retired
  • CHEETAH-1 – Under Development[23]

South Korea

Spain

Turkey

Ukraine

United Kingdom

United States


Comparison of Saturn V, Space Shuttle, three Ares rockets, and SLS Block 1
Atlas rockets
Delta rockets
Falcon rockets
Titan rockets

See also

References

  1. ^ Argentina Missile Chronology
  2. ^ "Argentina Plans First Domestic Satellite Launch". Parabolic Arc. 2011-10-09. Retrieved 2013-08-02.
  3. ^ "Is ISRO Working on Three Reusable Rocket Designs at Once?".
  4. ^ "ISRO developing heavy lift launch vehicles". 30 May 2015.
  5. ^ a b [1]
  6. ^ [2]
  7. ^ "M-4S / Satellite Launch Vehicles". ISAS. Archived from the original on 2013-05-16. Retrieved 2013-01-07.
  8. ^ "M-3C / Satellite Launch Vehicles". ISAS. Archived from the original on 2013-02-18. Retrieved 2013-01-07.
  9. ^ "M-3H / Satellite Launch Vehicles". ISAS. Archived from the original on 2013-05-16. Retrieved 2013-01-07.
  10. ^ "M-3S / Satellite Launch Vehicles". ISAS. Archived from the original on 2013-05-16. Retrieved 2013-01-07.
  11. ^ "M-3SII / Satellite Launch Vehicles". ISAS. Archived from the original on 2012-10-18. Retrieved 2013-01-07.
  12. ^ "Rocket Lab Celebrates Rich Ten-Year History". Rocket Lab USA. June 30, 2016.
  13. ^ [3]
  14. ^ https://space.skyrocket.de/directories/launcher_taiwan.htm
  15. ^ https://spacewatch.global/2019/12/taiwans-tispace-enters-crowded-small-satellite-launch-market-with-large-ambitions/
  16. ^ http://www.tispace.com/launch.html
  17. ^ [4]
  18. ^ [5]
  19. ^ [6]
  20. ^ [7]
  21. ^ [8]
  22. ^ [9]
  23. ^ "CHEETAH-1". b14643.de. Retrieved 2013-02-02.
  24. ^ Tong-hyung, Kim (2008-07-23). "Russia Dragging Feet Over Korean Rocket Launch". Korea Times. Retrieved 2008-12-29.
  25. ^ "South Korea's First Rocket Launch Might Be Put Off". Space-Travel.com. 2008-07-24. Retrieved 2008-12-29.
  26. ^ [10]
  27. ^ "Black Prince (project)". b14643.de. Retrieved 2019-11-11.
  28. ^ "Startup Company Orbex Reveals Prime Rocket That Could Launch From The U.K. In 2021". Forbes. 2019-02-07. Retrieved 2019-09-12.
  29. ^ "Skyrora Reveals Launch Of Second Private Rocket From U.K. Soil". Forbes. 2019-08-08. Retrieved 2019-09-12.
  30. ^ "Jeff Bezos is not screwing around with his plans to colonize space". ars Technica. 2016-09-12. Retrieved 2019-09-12.