2010 in spaceflight

Summary

2010 in spaceflight
SpaceX Dragon COTS-1 launch.jpg
The Dragon capsule's maiden launch aboard a Falcon 9 rocket on 8 December 2010.
Orbital launches
First16 January
Last29 December
Total74
Successes70
Failures4
Partial failures0
Catalogued70
Rockets
Maiden flightsAtlas V 501
Atlas V 531
Falcon 9 v1.0
GSLV Mk. II
Minotaur IV
RetirementsDelta II 7420
Molniya-M
Kosmos-3M
Crewed flights
Orbital7
Total travellers31

The year 2010 in spaceflight saw a number of notable events in worldwide spaceflight activities. These included the first test flight of the SpaceX Dragon commercial resupply spacecraft, which is intended to resupply the International Space Station (ISS), and the maiden flights of the Falcon 9 and Minotaur IV rockets. In June 2010, South Korea conducted a second Naro-1 launch, after the failure of the rocket's maiden flight in 2009; however, the second attempt also failed. The Kosmos-3M was retired from service, making its final flight in April. The Molniya-M was also retired from service, making its final flight in September.[1]

Overview

The first suborbital launch of 2010 was conducted at 23:00 GMT on 10 January, when a Black Brant IX sounding rocket was launched as a target for the Boeing YAL-1 airborne-laser platform. On 11 January, China conducted an ABM test, involving two missiles. The first orbital launch occurred at 16:12 UTC on 16 January, when a Long March 3C launched the Compass-G1 navigation satellite from the Xichang Satellite Launch Centre.

Seventy-four orbital launches were attempted in 2010, with seventy being successful and four ending in failure. The last orbital launch was made on 29 December, when an Ariane 5ECA launched the Hispasat-1E and Koreasat 6 spacecraft from Guiana Space Centre, near Kourou.

Space exploration

Akatsuki, the first Japanese mission to Venus, was launched on an H-IIA carrier rocket in May. It is intended to look for lightning and volcanoes on Venus.[2] Despite a successful launch,[3] the spacecraft failed to enter Cytherocentric orbit in December, but it managed to enter the orbit around Venus five years later in December 2015. IKAROS, the first operational solar sail, was launched on the same rocket as Akatsuki.

The first Japanese asteroid probe, Hayabusa, returned to Earth on 13 June, having landed on 25143 Itokawa in an effort to collect samples.[4] It was also the world's first successful sample return mission from an asteroid.[5]

On 1 October at 10:59:57 UTC, China successfully launched the Chang'e-2 spacecraft, the nation's second mission to explore the Moon. A Long March 3C rocket was used for the launch, which occurred from the Xichang Satellite Launch Centre. The spacecraft conducted a mission similar to that of the earlier Chang'e-1 spacecraft, but with a focus on mapping potential landing sites in preparation for the Chang'e-3 uncrewed lunar lander.[6]

Crewed spaceflight

Seven crewed launches were planned for 2010, with three Space Shuttle missions and four Soyuz flights for International Space Station (ISS) crew rotation. STS-130, using orbiter Endeavour, was the first crewed flight of the year, launching on 8 February with the Tranquility node and Cupola for the ISS. On 5 April, Discovery launched on mission STS-131, with the Leonardo MPLM to resupply the outpost.

Soyuz TMA-18 launched the Expedition 23 crew to the ISS on 2 April; it was scheduled to spend around six months docked to the station to facilitate crew escape in an emergency. Shortly before, Soyuz TMA-16 undocked, transporting former ISS crewmembers back to Earth. On 14 May, Space Shuttle Atlantis launched on its second-to-last flight, STS-132, carrying the Rassvet module to the ISS. Soyuz TMA-19 launched with Expedition 24 on 15 June. Soyuz TMA-01M, the first flight of a modernised Soyuz-TMA spacecraft, launched on 8 October with the Expedition 25 crew for the ISS. Then, to end the year, Expedition 26 launched aboard Soyuz TMA-20 on 15 December.

Launch failures

Four orbital launch failures occurred in 2010, two affecting Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicles, one affecting a Naro-1 rocket, and one affecting a Proton rocket. The first occurred on 15 April, when the GSLV Mk.II launched on its maiden flight. The rocket's third stage malfunctioned, resulting in the stage, and the GSAT-4 satellite, failing to achieve orbit and falling into the sea. The second failure occurred during the second launch of the Naro-1 rocket, carrying the STSAT-2B spacecraft. The rocket exploded 137 seconds into the flight.[7]

The third failure occurred on 5 December, when a Proton-M with the first Blok DM-03 upper stage failed to inject three Glonass-M satellites into orbit. Before launch, the Blok DM was fuelled incorrectly, resulting in the rocket being too heavy to reach its parking orbit.[8] The fourth failure occurred on 25 December 2010, when a GSLV Mk.I exploded during the launch of GSAT-5P. The rocket was destroyed by range safety, after control of the liquid-fuelled boosters attached to the first stage was lost.[9]

Orbital launches

Date and time (UTC) Rocket Flight number Launch site LSP
Payload
(⚀ = CubeSat)
Operator Orbit Function Decay (UTC) Outcome
Remarks

January

16 January
16:12
China Long March 3C China Xichang LC-2 China CNSA
China Compass-G1 CNSA Geosynchronous Navigation In orbit Operational
28 January
00:18
Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Enhanced Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 81/24 Russia Khrunichev
Russia Globus-1M #12L (Raduga-1M 2) VKS Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational

February

3 February
03:45
Russia Soyuz-U Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 1/5 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Progress M-04M / 36P Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics 1 July
14:40
Successful
ISS flight 36P
8 February
09:14
United States Space Shuttle Endeavour United States Kennedy LC-39A United States United Space Alliance
United States STS-130 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS assembly 22 February
03:22
Successful
United Nations Tranquility[10] NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS assembly In orbit Operational
United Nations Cupola NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS assembly In orbit Operational
Crewed flight with six astronauts.
11 February
15:23
United States Atlas V 401 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States United Launch Alliance
United States Solar Dynamics Observatory NASA Geosynchronous Heliophysics In orbit Operational
12 February
00:39
Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Enhanced Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 200/39 Russia United States International Launch Services
United Nations Intelsat 16 Intelsat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational

March

1 March
21:19
Russia Proton-M / DM-2 Enhanced Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 81/24 Russia Khrunichev
Russia Kosmos 2459
(Glonass-M 731)
VKS Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
Russia Kosmos 2460
(Glonass-M 732)
VKS Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
Russia Kosmos 2461
(Glonass-M 733)
VKS Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
4 March
23:57
United States Delta IV-M+ (4,2) United States Cape Canaveral SLC-37B United States United Launch Alliance
United States GOES-P (GOES-15) NOAA / NASA Geosynchronous Meteorology In orbit Operational
5 March
04:55
China Long March 4C China Jiuquan SLS-2 China CNSA
China Yaogan 9 CNSA Low Earth (SSO) ELINT In orbit Operational
China Yaogan 9 subsatellite CNSA Low Earth (SSO) ELINT In orbit Operational
China Yaogan 9 subsatellite CNSA Low Earth (SSO) ELINT In orbit Operational
First Long March 4 series launch from Jiuquan.
20 March
18:27
Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Enhanced Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 200/39 Russia United States International Launch Services
United States Echostar XIV Echostar Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational

April

2 April
04:04
Russia Soyuz-FG Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 1/5 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Soyuz TMA-18 Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) Expedition 23 25 September
05:23
Successful
Crewed flight with three cosmonauts.
5 April
10:21
United States Space Shuttle Discovery[11] United States Kennedy LC-39A United States United Space Alliance
United States STS-131 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics 20 April
13:08:35
Successful
Italy United States Leonardo MPLM ASI / NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics Successful
Crewed flight with seven astronauts.
8 April
13:57
Ukraine Dnepr Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 109/95 Russia ISC Kosmotras
Europe Cryosat-2[12] ESA Low Earth Climatology In orbit Operational
15 April
10:57
India GSLV Mk II India Satish Dhawan SLP India ISRO
India GSAT-4 (HealthSat) ISRO Intended: Geosynchronous Communications
Navigation
15 April Launch failure
Maiden flight of GSLV Mk. II, third stage failure.
16 April
15:00[13]
Russia Soyuz-U Russia Plesetsk Site 16/2 Russia VKS
Russia Kosmos 2462 (Kobal't-M) VKS Low Earth Reconnaissance 21 July Successful
22 April
23:52[14]
United States Atlas V 501 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States United Launch Alliance
United States USA-212 (X-37B OTV-1)[14] U.S. Air Force Low Earth Technology demonstration 3 December
09:16
Successful
Maiden flight of Atlas V 501 and Boeing X-37B.
24 April
11:19
Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Enhanced Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 200/39 Russia United States International Launch Services
Netherlands SES-1 (OS-1) SES World Skies Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
27 April
01:05
Russia Kosmos-3M Russia Plesetsk Site 132/1 Russia VKS
Russia Kosmos 2463 (Parus) VKS Low Earth Navigation
Communications
In orbit Operational
Final flight of Kosmos-3M.
28 April
17:15
Russia Soyuz-U Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 1/5 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Progress M-05M / 37P Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics 15 November
09:35:39
Successful
ISS flight 37P

May

14 May
18:20
United States Space Shuttle Atlantis[11] United States Kennedy LC-39A United States United Space Alliance
United States STS-132 NASA Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics 26 May
12:48:11
Successful
United Nations Rassvet (MRM-1) Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS assembly In orbit Operational
Crewed flight with six astronauts.
20 May
21:58:22[17]
Japan H-IIA 202 Japan Tanegashima LA-Y1 Japan MHI
Japan Akatsuki (Planet-C) JAXA Intended: Cytherocentric
Actual: Heliocentric, corrected to Cytherocentric
Venus orbiter In orbit Operational after partial spacecraft failure
Japan IKAROS JAXA Heliocentric Solar sail In orbit Successful
Japan Waseda-SAT2 Waseda Low Earth Earth observation 15 August[18] Spacecraft failure[15][19]
Japan Hayato (K-Sat)[20] Kagoshima Low Earth Earth observation 28 June[21] – 14[22] July Partial spacecraft failure
Japan Negai☆'' Soka Low Earth Technology demonstration 26 June[23] Successful
Japan Shin'en (UNITEC-1)[24] UNISEC Heliocentric Technology demonstration In orbit Spacecraft failure[15][25]
Japan DCAM-1 JAXA Heliocentric Technology demonstration In orbit Successful
Japan DCAM-2 JAXA Heliocentric Technology demonstration In orbit Successful
Waseda-SAT2 never contacted ground, Hayato affected by communications problems, contact lost with Shin'en on 21 May, unclear if data has been received since.[15] DCAM spacecraft deployed from IKAROS and used to observe deployment of the solar sail.[16] Akatsuki malfunctioned during Cytherocentric orbit insertion, and failed to enter orbit. It managed to orbit around Venus five years later.
21 May
22:01
Europe Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
Luxembourg Astra 3B SES Astra Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Germany COMSATBw-2 Bundeswehr Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
28 May
03:00
United States Delta IV-M+ (4,2) United States Cape Canaveral SLC-37B United States United Launch Alliance
United States USA-213 (GPS IIF SV-1) U.S. Air Force Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational

June

2 June
01:59
Russia Rokot / Briz-KM[26] Russia Plesetsk Site 133/3 Europe Russia Eurockot[27]
Japan SERVIS-2 USEF Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
2 June
15:53:04
China Long March 3C China Xichang LC-2 China CNSA
China Compass-G3 CNSA Geosynchronous Navigation In orbit Operational
3 June
22:00:08
Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Enhanced Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 200/39 Russia United States International Launch Services
Saudi Arabia Badr-5 ARABSAT Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
4 June
18:45[30]
United States Falcon 9 v1.0[31][32][33] United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 United States SpaceX[34]
United States DSQU SpaceX Low Earth Boilerplate 27 June
00:50[35]
Successful
Maiden flight of Falcon 9.[28][29]
10 June
08:01[36]
Russia South Korea Naro-1 South Korea Naro LC-1[37] Russia South Korea Khrunichev / KARI
South Korea STSAT-2B KARI Intended: Low Earth Technology demonstration +137 seconds Launch failure
Exploded during first stage burn.[7]
15 June
01:39[38]
China Long March 2D China Jiuquan SLS-2 China CNSA
China Shijian XII[39] CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
15 June
14:42
Ukraine Dnepr[40] Russia Dombarovsky Site 13 Russia ISC Kosmotras
Sweden Prisma-Mango SSC Low Earth (SSO)[41] Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
Sweden Prisma-Tango SSC Low Earth (SSO)[41] Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
France Picard CNES Low Earth (SSO)[41] Helioseismology In orbit Operational
Ukraine BPA-1 Hartron-Arkos Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
BPA-1 intentionally remained attached to upper stage.
15 June
21:35
Russia Soyuz-FG Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 1/5 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Soyuz TMA-19 Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) Expedition 24 26 November
04:46:53
Successful
Crewed flight with three cosmonauts
21 June
02:14
Ukraine Dnepr Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 109/95 Russia ISC Kosmotras
Germany TanDEM-X DLR Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
22 June
19:00
Israel Shavit-2 Israel Palmachim Israel Israel Aerospace Industries
Israel Ofek-9[43] IAI / Israeli Defense Forces Low Earth (retrograde) Reconnaissance In orbit Operational[44]
Known as Ofek-8 before launch.[42]
26 June
21:41
Europe Ariane 5 ECA[45] France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
Saudi Arabia ArabSat-5A ARABSAT Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
South Korea Chollian (COMS-1) KARI Geosynchronous[46] Communications
Meteorology
Oceanography
In orbit Operational[47]
30 June
15:35
Russia Soyuz-U Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 1/5 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Progress M-06M / 38P Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics 6 September
12:53:20
Successful
ISS flight 38P

July

10 July
18:40
Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Enhanced Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 200/39 Russia United States International Launch Services
United States EchoStar XV Echostar Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
12 July[48]
03:53
India PSLV-CA India Satish Dhawan FLP India ISRO
India Cartosat-2B ISRO Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
Algeria AlSat-2A ASAL Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
India StudSat StudSat Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
Norway AISSat-1 NDRE Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
Switzerland TIsat-1 SUPSI Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
AISSat and TIsat cubeSats to be launched as NLS-6, coordinated by UTIAS
31 July
21:30
China Long March 3A China Xichang LC-3 China CNSA
China Compass IGSO-1 CNSA IGSO Navigation In orbit Operational

August

4 August
20:59
Europe Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
Egypt Nilesat-201 Nilesat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
Mauritius RASCOM-QAF 1R RASCOM-QAF Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
9 August
22:49[49]
China Long March 4C China Taiyuan LC-2 China CNSA
China Yaogan 10 CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Reconnaissance In orbit Operational
14 August
11:07
United States Atlas V 531 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-41 United States United Launch Alliance
United States USA-214 (AEHF-1) U.S. Air Force Intended: Geosynchronous
Actual: GTO
Communications In orbit Partial spacecraft failure[50]
Operational
Maiden flight of Atlas V 531; liquid apogee motor failed to operate during orbital insertion process.[50]
24 August
07:10
China Long March 2D China Jiuquan SLS-2 China CNSA
China Tian Hui 1 CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational

September

2 September
00:53:43
Russia Proton-M / DM-2 Enhanced Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 81/24 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Kosmos 2464
(Glonass-M 736)
VKS Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
Russia Kosmos 2465
(Glonass-M 737)
VKS Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
Russia Kosmos 2466
(Glonass-M 738)
VKS Medium Earth Navigation In orbit Operational
4 September
16:14
China Long March 3B China Xichang LC-2 China CNSA
China Chinasat-6A Sinosat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
8 September
03:30
Russia Rokot / Briz-KM Russia Plesetsk Site 133/3 Russia RVSN RF
Russia Gonets-M No.2 Gonets Satellite System[51] Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
Russia Kosmos 2467 (Strela-3) VKS Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
Russia Kosmos 2468 (Strela-3) VKS Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
10 September
10:22
Russia Soyuz-U Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 31/6 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Progress M-07M / 39P Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics 20 February 2011
16:12
Successful
ISS flight 39P
11 September[52]
11:17
Japan H-IIA 202[53] Japan Tanegashima LA-Y1 Japan MHI
Japan QZSS-1 (Michibiki) JAXA Tundra Navigation In orbit Operational
21 September
04:03:30
United States Atlas V 501 United States Vandenberg SLC-3E United States United Launch Alliance
United States USA-215 NRO Low Earth (retrograde) In orbit Operational
NRO Launch 41
22 September
02:42[54]
China Long March 2D China Jiuquan SLS-2 China CNSA
China Yaogan 11 CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Reconnaissance In orbit Operational
China Zheda Pixing 1B CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
China Zheda Pixing 1C CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
26 September
04:41
United States Minotaur IV United States Vandenberg SLC-8 United States Orbital Sciences
United States USA-216 (SBSS) U.S. Air Force Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration
Space surveillance
In orbit Operational
First orbital launch of Minotaur IV.
30 September[55]
17:01[1]
Russia Molniya-M / 2BL Russia Plesetsk Site 16/2 Russia RVSN RF
Russia Kosmos 2469 (Oko) VKS Molniya Missile defense In orbit Successful
Final flight of Molniya-M.[1]

October

1 October
10:59:57[56]
China Long March 3C China Xichang LC-2 China CNSA
China Chang'e 2 CNSA Selenocentric[57] Lunar orbiter In orbit Operational
6 October
00:49
China Long March 4B China Taiyuan LC-2 China CNSA
China Shijian 6G CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
China Shijian 6H CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
7 October
23:10:57
Russia Soyuz-FG Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 1/5 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Soyuz TMA-01M Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) Expedition 25 19 March 2011
07:54
Successful
Crewed flight with three cosmonauts, maiden flight of modernised Soyuz-TMA spacecraft.
14 October
18:53[58]
Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 81/24 Russia United States International Launch Services
United States XM-5 XM Satellite Radio Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
19 October
17:10:59
Russia Soyuz-2.1a / Fregat Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 31/6 Europe Russia Starsem
United States Globalstar-2 #1 Globalstar Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
United States Globalstar-2 #2 Globalstar Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
United States Globalstar-2 #3 Globalstar Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
United States Globalstar-2 #4 Globalstar Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
United States Globalstar-2 #5 Globalstar Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
United States Globalstar-2 #6 Globalstar Low Earth Communications In orbit Operational
27 October
15:11:53
Russia Soyuz-U Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 1/5 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Progress M-08M / 40P Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) ISS logistics 24 January 2011 Successful[59]
ISS flight 40P.
28 October[61]
21:51
Europe Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
France Eutelsat W3B Eutelsat Intended: Geosynchronous
Actual: GTO
Communications In orbit Spacecraft failure[62]
Japan BSAT-3b[63] BSAT Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational[64]
Eutelsat W3B written-off as a total loss immediately after launch due to an oxidizer leak in the satellite's main propulsion system.[60]
31 October
16:26
China Long March 3C China Xichang LC-2 China CNSA
China Compass-G4 CNSA Geosynchronous Navigation In orbit Operational

November

2 November
00:59[65]
Russia Soyuz-2.1a / Fregat Russia Plesetsk Site 43/4 Russia RVSN RF
Russia Meridian 3 VKS Molniya Communications In orbit Operational
4 November
18:37[66]
China Long March 4C China Taiyuan LC-2 China CNSA
China Feng Yun 3B CNSA Low Earth (SSO) Meteorology In orbit Operational
6 November
02:20
United States Delta II 7420-10 United States Vandenberg SLC-2W United States United Launch Alliance
Italy COSMO-4 ASI Low Earth (SSO) Earth observation In orbit Operational
Final flight of Delta II 7420.[67]
14 November
17:29
Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Enhanced Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 200/39 Russia United States International Launch Services
United States SkyTerra-1 SkyTerra Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational[68]
20 November
01:25
United States Minotaur IV / HAPS United States Kodiak LP-1 United States Orbital Sciences
United States STPSat-2 STP Low Earth Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
United States RAX University of Michigan Low Earth Auroral In orbit Operational
United States O/OREOS NASA AMES Low Earth Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
United States FASTSAT NASA Low Earth Technology demonstration In orbit Partial spacecraft failure
United States NanoSail-D2 NASA Low Earth Technology demonstration 17 September 2011[69] Successful
United States FalconSat-5 USAFA Low Earth Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
United States Sara-Lily (FASTRAC 1) Texas Low Earth Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
United States Emma (FASTRAC 2) UT Austin Low Earth Technology demonstration In orbit Operational
Maiden flight of Minotaur IV/HAPS. NanoSail-D2 should have been deployed from FASTSAT seven days after launch, immediate deployment failed but ejection was confirmed almost two months later on 19 January 2011
21 November
22:58[70]
United States Delta IV Heavy United States Cape Canaveral SLC-37B United States United Launch Alliance
United States USA-223 (Mentor) NRO Geosynchronous Reconnaissance In orbit Operational
NRO launch 32
24 November
16:09[71]
China Long March 3A China Xichang LC-3 China CNSA
China Chinasat 20A CNSA Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
26 November
18:39
Europe Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
United Nations Intelsat 17 Intelsat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
United Kingdom HYLAS-1[72] Avanti[73] Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
40th consecutive Ariane 5 launch success.

December

5 December
10:25
Russia Proton-M / DM-03 Enhanced Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 81/24 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Glonass-M 739 VKS Intended: Medium Earth Navigation 5 December Launch failure
Russia Glonass-M 740 VKS Intended: Medium Earth Navigation
Russia Glonass-M 741 VKS Intended: Medium Earth Navigation
Maiden flight of Blok DM-03. Incorrect fuelling of upper stage led to mass being too great to achieve parking orbit, reentered over the Pacific Ocean.[8]
8 December
15:43
United States Falcon 9 v1.0 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 United States SpaceX
United States Dragon C1 SpaceX / NASA Low Earth Flight test 8 December
19:02
Successful
United States SMDC-ONE 1 U.S. Army Low Earth Communications 12 January 2011 Successful
United States Mayflower-Caerus Northrop Grumman / USC Low Earth Technology demonstration 22 December Successful
United States QbX-1 NRO Low Earth Technology demonstration 6 January 2011 Successful
United States QbX-2 NRO Low Earth Technology demonstration 16 January 2011 Successful
United States Perseus 000 LANL Low Earth Technology demonstration 30 December Successful
United States Perseus 001 LANL Low Earth Technology demonstration 31 December Successful
United States Perseus 002 LANL Low Earth Technology demonstration 30 December Successful
United States Perseus 003 LANL Low Earth Technology demonstration 31 December Successful
COTS Demo 1; maiden flight of the SpaceX Dragon; Mayflower included Caerus payload operated by USC.
15 December
19:09[74]
Russia Soyuz-FG Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 1/5 Russia Roscosmos
Russia Soyuz TMA-20 Roscosmos Low Earth (ISS) Expedition 26 24 May 2011
02:27
Successful
Crewed flight with three cosmonauts.
17 December
20:04
China Long March 3A China Xichang LC-3 China CNSA
China Compass IGSO-2 CNSA IGSO Navigation In orbit Operational
25 December
10:34
India GSLV Mk.I India Satish Dhawan SLP India ISRO
India GSAT-5P ISRO Intended: Geosynchronous Communications 25 December Launch failure
Disintegrated during first stage flight.
26 December
22:51
Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Enhanced Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 200/39 Russia United States International Launch Services
France KA-SAT Eutelsat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
29 December
21:27
Europe Ariane 5 ECA France Kourou ELA-3 France Arianespace
Spain Hispasat-1E Hispasat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational
South Korea Koreasat 6[75][76] Koreasat Geosynchronous Communications In orbit Operational

Suborbital flights

Deep space rendezvous

Date Spacecraft Event Remarks
12 January Cassini 65th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 1,073 km (667 mi)
28 January Cassini 66th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 7,490 km (4,654 mi)
31 January Artemis P1 Lunar flyby Closest approach: 11,992 km (7,451 mi) at 08:13 UTC[115]
1 February Artemis P2 Lunar flyby Closest approach: 69,222 km (43,013 mi) at 14:44 UTC[115]
13 February Artemis P1 Lunar flyby Closest approach: 2,958 km (1,838 mi) at 10:06 UTC[115]
13 February Cassini Flyby of Mimas Closest approach: 9,520 km (5,915 mi)
16 February Mars Express Flyby of Phobos Closest approach: 991 km (616 mi)
22 February Mars Express Flyby of Phobos Closest approach: 574 km (357 mi)
25 February Mars Express Flyby of Phobos Closest approach: 398 km (247 mi)
28 February Mars Express Flyby of Phobos Closest approach: 226 km (140 mi)
1 March Artemis P2 Lunar flyby Closest approach: 68,036 km (42,276 mi) at 04:11 UTC[115]
2 March Cassini 2nd flyby of Rhea Closest approach: 100 km (62 mi)
3 March Cassini Flyby of Helene Closest approach: 1,803 km (1,120 mi)
3 March Mars Express Flyby of Phobos Closest approach: 67 km (42 mi)
7 March Mars Express Flyby of Phobos Closest approach: 107 km (66 mi)
10 March Mars Express Flyby of Phobos Closest approach: 286 km (178 mi)
13 March Mars Express Flyby of Phobos Closest approach: 476 km (296 mi)
16 March Mars Express Flyby of Phobos Closest approach: 662 km (411 mi)
19 March Mars Express Flyby of Phobos Closest approach: 848 km (527 mi)
23 March Mars Express Flyby of Phobos Closest approach: 1,341 km (833 mi)
26 March Mars Express Flyby of Phobos Closest approach: 1,304 km (810 mi)
28 March Artemis P2 Lunar flyby Closest approach: 9,366 km (5,820 mi) at 07:34 UTC[115]
5 April Cassini 67th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 7,462 km (4,637 mi)
7 April Cassini 2nd flyby of Dione Closest approach: 504 km (313 mi)
28 April Cassini 9th flyby of Enceladus Closest approach: 103 km (64 mi)
18 May Cassini 10th flyby of Enceladus Closest approach: 201 km (125 mi)
20 May Cassini 68th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 1,400 km (870 mi)
5 June Cassini 69th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 2,044 km (1,270 mi)
13 June Hayabusa First sample return mission from asteroid Sample canister successful recovered to Earth
21 June Cassini 70th flyby of Titan Closest approach: 955 km (593 mi)
7 July Cassini 71st flyby of Titan Closest approach: 1,005 km (624 mi)
10 July Rosetta Flyby of 21 Lutetia Closest approach: 3,100 km (1,926 mi)[116]
13 August Cassini 11th flyby of Enceladus Closest approach: 2,554 km (1,587 mi)
25 August Artemis P1 LL2 orbit insertion
24 September Cassini 72nd flyby of Titan Closest approach: 8,175 km (5,080 mi)
6 October Chang'e 2 Lunar orbit insertion
16 October Cassini Flyby of Pallene Closest approach: 36,000 km (22,369 mi)
22 October Artemis P2 LL1 orbit insertion
4 November Deep Impact Flyby of Hartley 2 Closest approach: 700 km (435 mi)[117]
11 November Cassini 73rd flyby of Titan
30 November Cassini 12th flyby of Enceladus Closest approach: 47.9 km (30 mi)
7 December Akatsuki 1st flyby of Venus Cytherocentric orbit insertion failure
Closest approach: 550 km (342 mi)
8 December IKAROS Flyby of Venus Closest approach: 80,800 km (50,207 mi)
21 December Cassini 13th flyby of Enceladus Closest approach: 50 km (31 mi)
December Shin'en Flyby of Venus not confirmed.
Distant, non-targeted flybys of Dione, Enceladus, Mimas, Rhea, Tethys and Titan by Cassini will occur throughout the first half of the year.

EVAs

Start Date/Time Duration End Time Spacecraft Crew Remarks
14 January
10:05
5 hours
44 minutes
15:49 Expedition 22
ISS Pirs
Russia Oleg Kotov
Russia Maksim Surayev
Prepared the Poisk module for future dockings.[118]
12 February
02:17
6 hours
32 minutes
08:49 STS-130
ISS Quest
United States Robert L. Behnken
United States Nicholas Patrick
Removed a protective cover on a port on the Unity node where Tranquility was berthed halfway through the spacewalk. The pair then transferred a spare parts platform for the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator from the shuttle to the station. Once that task is completed Behnken and Patrick made several connections on the newly installed Tranquility node to begin its activation.
14 February
02:20
5 hours
54 minutes
08:14 STS-130
ISS Quest
United StatesRobert L. Behnken
United StatesNicholas Patrick
Installed ammonia plumbing and connectors between Unity, Destiny and Tranquility and covered them with thermal insulation. Prepared the nadir port on Tranquility for the relocation of the Cupola, and installed handrails on the exterior of Tranquility.
17 February
02:15
5 hours
48 minutes
08:03 STS-130
ISS Quest
United StatesRobert L. Behnken
United StatesNicholas Patrick
Installed additional ammonia plumbing between Unity and Tranquility, removed insulation and launch locks from the Cupola, installed additional handrails on the exterior of Tranquility and performed get-ahead tasks to support the installation of a Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF) on the exterior of Zarya with cable installation on Unity and the S0 truss.[citation needed]
9 April
05:31
6 hours
27 minutes
11:58 STS-131
ISS Quest
United States Richard Mastracchio
United States Clayton Anderson
Relocated new an ammonia tank from the Shuttle's payload bay to a temporary stowage location and disconnected the fluid lines to the old ammonia tank on the S1 truss. Retrieved a Japanese seed experiment from the exterior of the Kibo laboratory for return to earth and replaced a failed gyroscope on the S0 truss. Performed get-ahead tasks including the opening of a window flap on the zenith CBM of Harmony, and removed launch restraint bolts from a Flex Hose Rotary Coupler (FHRC) on the P1 truss.[citation needed]
11 April
05:30
7 hours
26 minutes
12:56 STS-131
ISS Quest
United StatesRichard Mastracchio
United StatesClayton Anderson
The old ammonia tank was removed from the S1 truss and was replaced with the new tank. The electrical connections to the tank were made, but the fluid lines were deferred to the mission's third EVA due to time constraints since the installation was prolonged by a problem with the bolts that hold the tank to the truss. The old tank was relocated to a temporary stowage location on the station and a foot restraint was relocated in preparation for a future shuttle mission's spacewalk.[citation needed]
13 April
06:14
6 hours
24 minutes
12:36 STS-131
ISS Quest
United StatesRichard Mastracchio
United StatesClayton Anderson
The fluid lines were connected to the new ammonia tank and the old tank was moved to the shuttle's payload bay for return to Earth. Micro-meteoroid debris shields from the Quest airlock which were no longer necessary were brought inside the airlock for return to Earth inside the Leonardo MPLM. The Z1 truss was prepared for the installation of a spare antenna on the next shuttle mission, and a foot restraint was relocated in preparation for a future spacewalk. The retrieval of an external carrier plate on Columbus was deferred to another shuttle mission due to time constraints after problems were encountered with attaching the old ammonia tank to a carrier in the payload bay, and several other tasks were deferred to later EVAs due to the replanning from the problems with the mission's second EVA.[citation needed]
17 May
11:54
7 hours
25 minutes
19:19 STS-132
ISS Quest
United States Garrett Reisman
United States Stephen G. Bowen
Installed a spare space-to-ground Ku-band antenna on the Z1 truss; installed new tool platform on Dextre, and broke torque on bolts holding replacement batteries to the ICC-VLD cargo carrier.[citation needed]
19 May
10:38
7 hours
9 minutes
17:47 STS-132
ISS Quest
United StatesStephen G. Bowen
United States Michael T. Good
Repaired Atlantis' Orbiter Boom Sensor System (OBSS); P6 battery replacement (4 of 6 units); and removed gimbal locks from the Ku-band antenna installed on the first EVA of the mission.[citation needed]
21 May
10:27
6 hours
46 minutes
17:13 STS-132
ISS Quest
United StatesMichael T. Good
United StatesGarrett Reisman
P6 battery replacement (final 2 of 6 units); installed ammonia "jumpers" at the P4/P5 interface; retrieved a spare PDGF from Atlantis' payload bay and stowed it inside the Quest airlock. The spacewalkers also replenished supplies of EVA tools in toolboxes on the exterior of the station.[citation needed]
27 July
04:11
6 hours
42 minutes
10:53 Expedition 24
ISS Pirs
Russia Fyodor Yurchikhin
Russia Mikhail Korniyenko
Replaced an ATV video camera on Zvezda, routed command and data handling lines from Zvezda and Zarya to the new Rassvet module as well as made KURS connections between Rassvet and Zarya to allow future automated dockings to the new module. Then the two cosmonauts jettisoned the old ATV video camera.[citation needed]
7 August
11:19
8 hours
3 minutes
19:22 Expedition 24
ISS Quest
United States Douglas H. Wheelock
United States Tracy Caldwell Dyson
Attempted to replace failed S1 ammonia pump module. The spacewalkers did not complete all of the planned tasks due to a quick disconnect that got stuck and would not release. The pair had to complete a "bake-out" in order to ensure there was no ammonia on their suits before re-entering the Space Station.[119]
11 August
12:27
7 hours
26 minutes
19:53 Expedition 24
ISS Quest
United StatesDouglas H. Wheelock
United StatesTracy Caldwell Dyson
Completed removal of failed pump module from the S1 truss and began installation preparations on the replacement pump.[120]
16 August
10:20
7 hours
20 minutes
17:40 Expedition 24
ISS Quest
United StatesDouglas H. Wheelock
United StatesTracy Caldwell Dyson
Installed new pump module on the S1 truss.[121]
15 November
14:55
6 hours
27 minutes
21:22 Expedition 25
ISS Pirs
RussiaFyodor Yurchikhin
RussiaOleg Skripochka
Install a multipurpose workstation on Zvezda, retrieve camera, retrieve kontur, install new materials experiment, collect samples below insulation.[122]

Orbital launch statistics

By country

For the purposes of this section, the yearly tally of orbital launches by country assigns each flight to the country of origin of the rocket, not to the launch services provider or the spaceport. For example, Dnepr rockets are counted under Ukraine even though they are launched from Russia.

China: 15Europe: 6India: 3Israel: 1Japan: 2South Korea: 1Russia: 28Ukraine: 3USA: 15Circle frame.svg
Country Launches Successes Failures Partial
failures
Remarks
 China 15 15 0 0
 Europe 6 6 0 0
 India 3 1 2 0
 Israel 1 1 0 0
 Japan 2 2 0 0
 South Korea 1 0 1 0 With Russian assistance
 Russia 28 27 1 0
 Ukraine 3 3 0 0 Launched from Russia
 United States 15 15 0 0
World 74 70 4 0

By rocket

By family

By type

By configuration

By spaceport

5
10
15
20
25
30
China
France
India
Israel
Japan
Kazakhstan
South Korea
Russia
United States
Site Country Launches Successes Failures Partial failures Remarks
Baikonur  Kazakhstan 24 23 1 0
Cape Canaveral  United States 8 8 0 0
Dombarovsky  Russia 1 1 0 0
Jiuquan  China 4 4 0 0
Kennedy  United States 3 3 0 0
Kodiak  United States 1 1 0 0
Kourou  France 6 6 0 0
Naro  South Korea 1 0 1 0
Palmachim  Israel 1 1 0 0
Plesetsk  Russia 6 6 0 0
Satish Dhawan  India 3 1 2 0
Taiyuan  China 3 3 0 0
Tanegashima  Japan 2 2 0 0
Vandenberg  United States 3 3 0 0
Xichang  China 8 8 0 0
Total 74 70 4 0

By orbit

  •   Transatmospheric
  •   Low Earth
  •   Low Earth (ISS)
  •   Low Earth (SSO)
  •   Low Earth (retrograde)
  •   Medium Earth
  •   Geosychronous
    (transfer)
  •   Inclined GSO
  •   High Earth
  •   Heliocentric
Orbital regime Launches Successes Failures Accidentally
achieved
Remarks
Transatmospheric 0 0 0 0
Low Earth 37 36 1 0 12 to ISS
Medium Earth / Molniya 6 5 1 0
Geosynchronous / GTO 29 27 2 0
High Earth / Lunar transfer 1 1 0 0
Heliocentric / Planetary transfer 1 1 0 0
Total 74 70 4 0

References

Generic references:
RocketSunIcon.svg Spaceflight portal
  • Bergin, Chris. "NASASpaceFlight.com".
  • Clark, Stephen. "Spaceflight Now".
  • Kelso, T.S. "Satellite Catalog (SATCAT)". CelesTrak.
  • Krebs, Gunter. "Chronology of Space Launches".
  • Kyle, Ed. "Space Launch Report".
  • McDowell, Jonathan. "Jonathan's Space Report".
  • Pietrobon, Steven. "Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive".
  • Wade, Mark. "Encyclopedia Astronautica".
  • Webb, Brian. "Southwest Space Archive".
  • Zak, Anatoly. "Russian Space Web".
  • "ISS Calendar". Spaceflight 101.
  • "NSSDCA Master Catalog". NASA Space Science Data Coordinated Archive. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
  • "Space Calendar". NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory.
  • "Space Information Center". JAXA.
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